From Tank Town to High Tech: The Clash of Community and Industrial Cycles

SUNY Press
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This is a book about the impact of high tech defense production on individuals, families, and communities. It analyzes the restructuring of an American industry around high tech defense production, and the effect of this restructuring on employment opportunities and on the redistribution of profits. The author is concerned with the construction of corporate hegemony which she defines in Gramscian terms as leadership by large corporations, establishing a pattern for industrial organization. Focusing on regional economic history and corporate policy, Dr. Nash identifies the interconnected issues that bear on the relationship between industrial transformation and social life, on the restructuring of the American economy, and the consequences of militarization and commercialization on the family and community.
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About the author

June C. Nash is Professor of Anthropology at the City College of New York. She is a co-editor of Women, Men, and the International Division of Labor, also published by SUNY Press.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9781438414157
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Anthropology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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