Rhetoric before and beyond the Greeks

SUNY Press
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Focusing on ancient rhetoric outside of the dominant Western tradition, this collection examines rhetorical practices in Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, and China. The book uncovers alternate ways of understanding human behavior and explores how these rhetorical practices both reflected and influenced their cultures. The essays address issues of historiography and raise questions about the application of Western rhetorical concepts to these very different ancient cultures. A chapter on suggestions for teaching each of these ancient rhetorics is included.
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About the author

Carol S. Lipson is Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University.

Roberta A. Binkley is Lecturer in English at Arizona State University.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Feb 29, 2012
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Pages
274
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ISBN
9780791485033
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Rhetoric
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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