Before Homosexuality in the Arab-Islamic World, 1500-1800

University of Chicago Press
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Attitudes toward homosexuality in the pre-modern Arab-Islamic world are commonly depicted as schizophrenic—visible and tolerated on one hand, prohibited by Islam on the other. Khaled El-Rouayheb argues that this apparent paradox is based on the anachronistic assumption that homosexuality is a timeless, self-evident fact to which a particular culture reacts with some degree of tolerance or intolerance. Drawing on poetry, biographical literature, medicine, dream interpretation, and Islamic texts, he shows that the culture of the period lacked the concept of homosexuality.
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About the author

Khaled El-Rouayheb is assistant professor of Islamic intellectual history in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University.



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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Mar 2, 2009
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9780226729909
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Middle East / General
Social Science / General
Social Science / LGBT Studies / Gay Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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After the collapse of the Twin Towers, fears about terrorism and Muslim culture went hand in hand. Gay Travels in the Muslim World enters the current war zones to bring real and very personal stories of gay men who live and travel in these dangerous areas. This book challenges readers' preconceptions and assumptions about both homosexuality and being Muslim, while showing the wide range of experiences—good and bad—about the regions as well as the differences in attitudes and beliefs.

Excerpts from Gay Travels in the Muslim World:

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From “It All Began with Mamadou” by Jay Davidson
Drawing definitive conclusions about a society after living here for a little more than a year is not a wise, safe, or responsible action on my part. If a society's culture is a mosaic of thousands of little tiles, then I like to think that what I have been able to piece together has been a tableau in which certain aspects have become discernable, some are a little less clear, and others remain in a way that I will never see as whole and comprehensible.

From “A Market and a Mosque” by Martin Foreman
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Gay Travels in the Muslim World is a refreshing, well written look a
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