Evolutionary Psychology: The New Science of the Mind, Edition 5

Psychology Press
4
Free sample

This book examines human psychology and behavior through the lens of modern evolutionary psychology. Evolutionary Psychology: The Ne w Science of the Mind, 5/e provides students with the conceptual tools of evolutionary psychology, and applies them to empirical research on the human mind. Content topics are logically arrayed, starting with challenges of survival, mating, parenting, and kinship; and then progressing to challenges of group living, including cooperation, aggression, sexual conflict, and status, prestige, and social hierarchies. Students gain a deep understanding of applying evolutionary psychology to their own lives and all the people they interact with.
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About the author

David M. Buss received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkley in 1981. He began his career in academics at Harvard, later moving to the University of Michigan before accepting his current position as Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas. His primary research interests include human sexuality, mating strategies, conflict between the sexes, homicide, stalking, and sexual victimization. The author of more than 200 scientific articles and 6 books, Buss has won numerous awards including the American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology (1988), the APA G. Stanley Hall Lectureship (1990), the APA Distinguished Scientist Lecturer Award (2001), and the Robert W. Hamilton Book Award (2000) for the first edition of Evolutionary Psychology: The New Science of the Mind. He is also the editor of the first comprehensive Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology (2005, Wiley). He enjoys extensive cross-cultural research collaborations and lectures widely within the United States and abroad.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Psychology Press
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Published on
Oct 2, 2015
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Pages
496
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ISBN
9781317345732
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / Cognitive Psychology & Cognition
Psychology / Social Psychology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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