Spirals of Energy: The ancient art of Selfica

DEVODAMA via PublishDrive
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A fascinating and mysterious discipline, “Selfica” creates objects made of metal, inks and colors that can interact with the environment in a positive way. Selfic structures enhance personal well-being, sensitivity, and mental and physical balance. Be it jewelry, metal structures or paintings, Selfic devices also help their users to learn more about themselves and get in touch with energetic dimensions and information fields different from those in which we are normally immersed. Selfica, developed through the research and teaching of Oberto “Falco” Airaudi, founder of Damanhur, Federation of Communities, is actually an ancient art-science, already known and used by many peoples of the past. This book recounts the experiments of many researchers and enthusiasts as well as those of the author, who has personally participated in many exciting experiences. It is a journey into a new dimension where time, space, emotions and memory respond to laws which are very different from those we are used to...
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Publisher
DEVODAMA via PublishDrive
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Published on
Feb 16, 2016
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Pages
222
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ISBN
9788899652067
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Science & Technology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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At the beginning of the twenty-first century, breathtaking changes in technology are posing stark challenges to our constitutional values. From free speech to privacy, from liberty and personal autonomy to the right against self-incrimination, basic constitutional principles are under stress from technological advances unimaginable even a few decades ago, let alone during the founding era. In this provocative collection, America's leading scholars of technology, law, and ethics imagine how to translate and preserve constitutional and legal values at a time of dizzying technological change.

Constitution 3.0 explores some of the most urgent constitutional questions of the near future. Will privacy become obsolete, for example, in a world where ubiquitous surveillance is becoming the norm? Imagine that Facebook and Google post live feeds from public and private surveillance cameras, allowing 24/7 tracking of any citizen in the world. How can we protect free speech now that Facebook and Google have more power than any king, president, or Supreme Court justice to decide who can speak and who can be heard? How will advanced brain-scan technology affect the constitutional right against self-incrimination? And on a more elemental level, should people have the right to manipulate their genes and design their own babies? Should we be allowed to patent new forms of life that seem virtually human? The constitutional challenges posed by technological progress are wide-ranging, with potential impacts on nearly every aspect of life in America and around the world.

The authors include Jamie Boyle, Duke Law School; Eric Cohen and Robert George, Princeton University; Jack Goldsmith, Harvard Law School; Orin Kerr, George Washington University Law School; Lawrence Lessig, Harvard Law School; Stephen Morse, University of Pennsylvania Law School; John Robertson, University of Texas Law School; Christopher Slobogin, Vanderbilt Law School; O. Carter Snead, Notre Dame Law School; Jeffrey Rosen, George Washington University Law School; Benjamin Wittes, Brookings Institution; Tim Wu, Columbia Law School; and Jonathan Zittrain, Harvard Law School.

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