Toxic Diversity: Race, Gender, and Law Talk in America

NYU Press
Free sample

Toxic Diversity offers an invigorating view of race, gender, and law in America. Analyzing the work of preeminent legal scholars such as Patricia Williams, Derrick Bell, Lani Guinier, and Richard Delgado, Dan Subotnik argues that race and gender theorists poison our social and intellectual environment by almost deliberately misinterpreting racial interaction and data and turning white males into victimizers. Far from energizing women and minorities, Subotnik concludes, theorists divert their energies from implementing America's social justice agenda.

Insisting, in the words of James Baldwin, that “not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced,” and that thoughtful Americans regardless of race and gender can handle frank conversations about difficult topics, Subotnik’s critique of race and gender theory pulls no punches as it confronts such inflammatory issues as single parenthood, the merit system in academic and business settings, gender privilege in the classroom, and crime.

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About the author

Dan Subotnik is professor of law at Touro College Law Center.

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Additional Information

Publisher
NYU Press
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Published on
Jul 31, 2005
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Pages
335
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ISBN
9780814740002
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Civil Law
Law / Civil Rights
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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