On Sunspots

University of Chicago Press
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Galileo’s telescopic discoveries, and especially his observation of sunspots, caused great debate in an age when the heavens were thought to be perfect and unchanging. Christoph Scheiner, a Jesuit mathematician, argued that sunspots were planets or moons crossing in front of the Sun. Galileo, on the other hand, countered that the spots were on or near the surface of the Sun itself, and he supported his position with a series of meticulous observations and mathematical demonstrations that eventually convinced even his rival.

On Sunspots collects the correspondence that constituted the public debate, including the first English translation of Scheiner’s two tracts as well as Galileo’s three letters, which have previously appeared only in abridged form. In addition, Albert Van Helden and Eileen Reeves have supplemented the correspondence with lengthy introductions, extensive notes, and a bibliography. The result will become the standard work on the subject, essential for students and historians of astronomy, the telescope, and early modern Catholicism.

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About the author

Eileen Reeves is professor of comparative literature at Princeton University. Albert Van Helden is professor of the history of science at the University of Utrecht and the translator of Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Oct 15, 2010
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Pages
432
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ISBN
9780226707174
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / General
Science / Astronomy
Science / General
Science / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Galileo’s life and works

* New introductions, specially written for this collection, by Professor Kenneth Richard Seddon, OBE (QUILL, The Queen’s University of Belfast)

* Features Galileo’s major works, with individual contents tables

* Images of how the books were first published, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts

* Excellent formatting of the texts

* Features four biographies - discover Galileo’s intriguing life

* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres


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CONTENTS:


The Books

THE STARRY MESSENGER

LETTER TO THE GRAND DUCHESS CHRISTINA

DISCOURSE ON FLOATING BODIES

DIALOGUE CONCERNING THE TWO CHIEF WORLD SYSTEMS

DISCOURSES AND MATHEMATICAL DEMONSTRATIONS RELATING TO TWO NEW SCIENCES


The Biographies

LIFE OF GALILEO by Sir David Brewster

THE TRIAL OF GALILEO by A. Mézières

GALILEO by Robert S. Ball

BRIEF BIOGRAPHY: GALILEO GALILIEI


Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles or to purchase this eBook as a Parts Edition of individual eBooks


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