The Golden Ticket: P, NP, and the Search for the Impossible

Princeton University Press
36
Free sample

The P-NP problem is the most important open problem in computer science, if not all of mathematics. Simply stated, it asks whether every problem whose solution can be quickly checked by computer can also be quickly solved by computer. The Golden Ticket provides a nontechnical introduction to P-NP, its rich history, and its algorithmic implications for everything we do with computers and beyond. Lance Fortnow traces the history and development of P-NP, giving examples from a variety of disciplines, including economics, physics, and biology. He explores problems that capture the full difficulty of the P-NP dilemma, from discovering the shortest route through all the rides at Disney World to finding large groups of friends on Facebook. The Golden Ticket explores what we truly can and cannot achieve computationally, describing the benefits and unexpected challenges of this compelling problem.
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About the author

Lance Fortnow is professor and chair of the School of Computer Science at Georgia Institute of Technology and the founder and coauthor of the Computational Complexity blog.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Mar 27, 2013
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781400846610
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Programming / Algorithms
Computers / Security / General
Mathematics / Calculus
Mathematics / Functional Analysis
Mathematics / History & Philosophy
Mathematics / Linear & Nonlinear Programming
Mathematics / Mathematical Analysis
Mathematics / Optimization
Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The intriguing tale of why the United States has never adopted the metric system, and what that says about us.

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