Tropical Rain Forests: An Ecological and Biogeographical Comparison

Wiley-Blackwell

The popular view of the tropical rainforest as a monolithic tangle of
rain-soaked trees, vines, birds, monkeys and big cats is a widespread
myth. Tropical Rain Forests: An Ecological and Biogeographical
Comparison
explodes that myth by showing that rain forests in
different tropical regions are unique despite superficial similarities.

Written by two leading figures in the field, this essential new
volume:


  • Emphasizes the distinctive characteristics of rain forests in
    tropical Asia, tropical America, Africa,Madagascar,New Guinea,
    and Australia
  • Begins with an introduction to the climate, biogeographic history,
    and environment of tropical rain forests
  • Presents an extended cross-continental treatment of major
    animal and plant groups
  • Outlines a research program involving cross-continental
    comparisons
  • Considers the impact of people on tropical forests and
    discusses conservation strategies based upon the characteristics
    of particular regions rather than a one-size-fits-all approach
  • Includes natural history examples, figures, and a stunning
    collection of color photographs

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About the author

Richard Primack, a professor at Boston University, has conducted research on forest ecology and conservation in Malaysia, India and Central America. He is the author of two leading textbooks in conservation biology, which have been translated into sixteen languages. He is the President of the Association for Tropical Biology and Editor of the journal Biological Conservation.


Richard Corlett, an associate professor at the University of Hong Kong, has studied tropical forests in New Guinea, Southeast Asia, and southern China. His major current research interest is in how rainforest plants and animals survive in human-dominated landscapes. He has previously taught ecology at the University of Chiang Mai, in Thailand, and at the National University of Singapore, and is co-author of books on the ecology of Singapore and Hong Kong.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
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Published on
Feb 5, 2009
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9781405141093
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Ecology
Technology & Engineering / Agriculture / Tropical Agriculture
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Reading information

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Richard T. Corlett
Richard T. Corlett
Tropical East Asia is home to over one billion people and faces massive human impacts from its rising population and rapid economic growth. It has already lost more than two-thirds of its forest cover and has the highest rates of deforestation and logging in the tropics. Hunting, coupled with the relentless trade in wildlife products, threatens all its large and many of its smaller vertebrates. Despite these problems, the region still supports an estimated 15-25% of global terrestrial biodiversity and is therefore a key area for conservation. Effective conservation action depends on a clear understanding of the ecological patterns and processes in the region. The first edition of The Ecology of Tropical East Asia was the first book to describe the terrestrial ecology of the entire East Asian tropics and subtropics, from southern China to western Indonesia. This second edition updates the contents and extends the coverage to include the very similar ecosystems of northeast India and Bhutan. The book deals with plants, animals, and the ecosystems they inhabit, as well as the diverse threats to their survival and the options for conservation. It provides the background knowledge of the region's ecology needed by both specialists and non-specialists to put their own work into a broader context. The accessible style, comprehensive coverage, and engaging illustrations make this advanced textbook an essential read for senior undergraduate and graduate level students studying the terrestrial ecology of the East Asian tropics, as well as an authoritative reference for professional ecologists, conservationists, and interested amateurs worldwide.
Richard B. Primack
In his meticulous notes on the natural history of Concord, Massachusetts, Henry David Thoreau records the first open flowers of highbush blueberry on May 11, 1853. If he were to look for the first blueberry flowers in Concord today, mid-May would be too late. In the 160 years since Thoreau’s writings, warming temperatures have pushed blueberry flowering three weeks earlier, and in 2012, following a winter and spring of record-breaking warmth, blueberries began flowering on April 1—six weeks earlier than in Thoreau’s time. The climate around Thoreau’s beloved Walden Pond is changing, with visible ecological consequences.

In Walden Warming, Richard B. Primack uses Thoreau and Walden, icons of the conservation movement, to track the effects of a warming climate on Concord’s plants and animals. Under the attentive eyes of Primack, the notes that Thoreau made years ago are transformed from charming observations into scientific data sets. Primack finds that many wildflower species that Thoreau observed—including familiar groups such as irises, asters, and lilies—have declined in abundance or have disappeared from Concord. Primack also describes how warming temperatures have altered other aspects of Thoreau’s Concord, from the dates when ice departs from Walden Pond in late winter, to the arrival of birds in the spring, to the populations of fish, salamanders, and butterflies that live in the woodlands, river meadows, and ponds.

Primack demonstrates that climate change is already here, and it is affecting not just Walden Pond but many other places in Concord and the surrounding region. Although we need to continue pressuring our political leaders to take action, Primack urges us each to heed the advice Thoreau offers in Walden: to “live simply and wisely.” In the process, we can each minimize our own contributions to our warming climate.
Richard T. Corlett
Tropical East Asia is home to over one billion people and faces massive human impacts from its rising population and rapid economic growth. It has already lost more than two-thirds of its forest cover and has the highest rates of deforestation and logging in the tropics. Hunting, coupled with the relentless trade in wildlife products, threatens all its large and many of its smaller vertebrates. Despite these problems, the region still supports an estimated 15-25% of global terrestrial biodiversity and is therefore a key area for conservation. Effective conservation action depends on a clear understanding of the ecological patterns and processes in the region. The first edition of The Ecology of Tropical East Asia was the first book to describe the terrestrial ecology of the entire East Asian tropics and subtropics, from southern China to western Indonesia. This second edition updates the contents and extends the coverage to include the very similar ecosystems of northeast India and Bhutan. The book deals with plants, animals, and the ecosystems they inhabit, as well as the diverse threats to their survival and the options for conservation. It provides the background knowledge of the region's ecology needed by both specialists and non-specialists to put their own work into a broader context. The accessible style, comprehensive coverage, and engaging illustrations make this advanced textbook an essential read for senior undergraduate and graduate level students studying the terrestrial ecology of the East Asian tropics, as well as an authoritative reference for professional ecologists, conservationists, and interested amateurs worldwide.
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