Teutonic Myth And Legend

Jazzybee Verlag
Free sample

This volume deals with the myths and legends of the Teutonic peoples--Norsemen, Goths, Vandals, Burgundians, Franks, Angles, Saxons, and all the other Germanic tribes whose descendants now occupy England, Northern France, Switzerland, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Iceland. The volume might have been called Northern European Myth and Legend. It is the body of folk tales, epics and religious beliefs which all Anglo-Saxons have inherited directly from their ancestors, and find most deeply embedded in every-day words and thoughts such as names for the days of the week, names recalling the gods and goddesses of our forefathers.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Jazzybee Verlag
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Published on
Dec 31, 2012
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Pages
588
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ISBN
9783849623661
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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In 1973, Norbert Krapf visited the Lohr region of Germany, to "make a connection with my ancestors, stand where they had once lived, see what they saw, hear what they heard." Inspired by the experience, he returned to America determined to learn more about the people he descended from. Beneath the Cherry Sapling, which brings together a rich selection of German legends in English, is the result of this search for identity. A collection of fifty-two legends form Franconia, the region where Professor Krapf traced his ancestors on both his parents' sides, Beneath the Cherry Sapling has much to offer the general reader and scholar alike. The legends, deeply rooted to the region whence they have sprung, are a vivid evocation of the people who for generations inhabited that region. They provide a glimpse of a way of life that, although long faded into history, is the necessary starting point for thousands of people who wish fully to understand their own lives today. Like the legends collected by the Brothers Grimm, the ones included herein feature a strong moralistic sense and often warn against some kind of excess or violation of secular or sacred law. Over a dozen deal directly with "crime and punishment," with human or divine retribution for some kind of wrongdoing. Others depict how excessive drinking provokes sudden illness or death of the reveler or his next of kin, or can turn a person into a murderer or murder victim. And still others have a religious dimensionand describe supernatural events occurring on feast days, miracles in which the Christ child appears, and clergy in need of piousness. There are also tales of magic, tales of treasure buried on the site of ruins, and "etiological" tales that explain the origin of something, such as a town crest of statue. This very handsome volume includes both the legend in the original German and Professor Krapf's translation in natural, "American" English on the facing page. Woodcuts depicting scenes from the legends appear throughout the book. Beneath the Cherry Sapling will be of particular interest to German scholars, folklorists, and those of German descent who wish to deepen their understanding of their heritage. It can also be used in introductory German courses where the instructor wishes to provide students with readily accessible texts.
In this volume the myths and legends of ancient Egypt are embraced in a historical narrative which begins with the rise of the great Nilotic civilization and ends with the Graeco-Roman Age. The principal deities are dealt with chiefly at the various periods in which they came into prominence, while the legends are so arranged as to throw light on the beliefs and manners and customs of the ancient people. Metrical renderings are given of such of the representative folk songs and poems as can be appreciated at the present day.

Egyptian mythology is of highly complex character, and cannot be considered apart from its racial and historical aspects. The Egyptians were, as a Hebrew prophet has declared, a "mingled people", and this view has been confirmed by recent ethnological research: "the process; of racial fusion begun in the Delta at the dawn of history", says Professor Elliot Smith, "spread through the whole land of Egypt". In localities the early Nilotic inhabitants accepted the religious beliefs of settlers, and fused these with their own. They also clung tenaciously to the crude and primitive tribal beliefs of their remote ancestors, and never abandoned an archaic conception even when they acquired new and more enlightened ideas; they accepted myths literally, and regarded with great sanctity ancient ceremonies and usages. They even showed a tendency to multiply rather than to reduce the number of their gods and goddesses, by symbolizing their attributes. As a result, we find it necessary to deal with a bewildering number of deities and a confused mass of beliefs, many of which are obscure and contradictory. But the average Egyptian was never dismayed by inconsistencies in religious matters: he seemed rather to be fascinated by them. There was, strictly speaking, no orthodox creed in Egypt; each provincial centre had its own distinctive theological system, and the religion of an individual appears to have depended mainly on his habits of life. "The Egyptian", as Professor Wiedemann has said, "never attempted to systematize his conceptions of the different divinities into a homogeneous religion. It is open to us to speak of the religious ideas of the Egyptians, but not of an Egyptian religion."Ê

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