The Emotional Mind: The Affective Roots of Culture and Cognition

Harvard University Press
Free sample

For 200 million years before humans developed a capacity to reason, the emotional centers of the brain were hard at work. Stephen Asma and Rami Gabriel help us understand the evolution of the mind by exploring this more primal capability that we share with other animals: the power to feel, which is the root of so much that makes us uniquely human.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Harvard University Press
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Published on
Apr 15, 2019
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9780674238923
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / Movements / Empiricism
Psychology / Emotions
Science / Life Sciences / Evolution
Science / Philosophy & Social Aspects
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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What really is emotional intelligence? This book, aimed primarily at the university academic and those working and/or studying in higher education, seeks to help readers understand the term and the role emotional intelligence plays in education and business. It clearly identifies and critiques the three main models: the ability model (Salovey and Mayer), the mixed Model (Goleman, Bar-On) and the trait model (Petrides and Furnham). It discusses eustress, distress and chronic stress, reflecting on the effects negative types of stress can have on the human body, demonstrating how the modern workplace can lead to burnout. It emphasizes the importance of a healthy work/life balance while acknowledging the demands and pressures placed on organisations to compete within the global marketplace.


It also explores how one may understand and process emotions, considering terms such as “learned optimism” and “learned helplessness”. Room for discussion is also given to the influence of bullying and harassment in the workplace and types of therapy that are presently available. It discusses strategies for coping with challenging experiences, providing anecdotes and case studies from university academics. It also considers how personality relates to emotional intelligence and how people cope with challenging experiences. The book delves into the term “intelligence”, showing how theories surrounding the concept have developed over the twentieth century; and it elucidates the link between emotional intelligence and wellbeing. The author discusses the effect stress can have on human telomeres (thus shortening lifespan) and sheds light on the darker sides of human nature, such as the so-called “dark triad” personality traits (psychopathy, narcissism and Machiavellian behaviour).


Overall, the book is dedicated to the vital question: “Emotional intelligence: does it really matter?”

The explosion of research on emotional intelligence (EI) in the past decade has provided increasing evidence that EI can be measured reliably and can be useful in predicting important outcomes, such as managerial effectiveness and relationship quality.

Naturally, people are now asking, "So, how does one improve EI?". Applying Emotional Intelligence collects the most important programs focused on that idea, and enquires of their originators, "What do you do?", "Why do you do it?", and, "What is the evidence for your approach?".

The emphasis of the book is applied, in that it provides and contrasts concrete examples of what we do in our interventions in a wide variety of situations. The chapters present descriptions of programs, including specific activities and exercises that influence emotional knowledge and social effectiveness more generally. While practical in its focus, this book also discusses the theoretical bases for these approaches.

These are new programs with outcomes that are now beginning to be studied. The book presents the most important and recent research findings that examine the efficacy of these programs. Applying Emotional Intelligence is a "must-read" for anyone interested in EI and its application. This book will be of interest to researchers conducting EI intervention research, as well as a wide variety of practitioners, including those interested in developing EI in organizations, health areas, clinical populations, and school-age settings. Finally, the book is designed to be relevant to the reader's own life, encouraging the reader to consider how the programs and the exercises might impact his or her personality and outlook, as well as contribute to the development of those who have themselves participated in the programs.

How we feel is as vital to our survival as how we think. This claim, based on the premise that emotions are largely adaptive, serves as the organizing theme of Why We Need Religion. This book is a novel pathway in a well-trodden field of religious studies and philosophy of religion. Stephen Asma argues that, like art, religion has direct access to our emotional lives in ways that science does not. Yes, science can give us emotional feelings of wonder and the sublime--we can feel the sacred depths of nature--but there are many forms of human suffering and vulnerability that are beyond the reach of help from science. Different emotional stresses require different kinds of rescue. Unlike secular authors who praise religion's ethical and civilizing function, Asma argues that its core value lies in its emotionally therapeutic power. No theorist of religion has failed to notice the importance of emotions in spiritual and ritual life, but truly systematic research has only recently delivered concrete data on the neurology, psychology, and anthropology of the emotional systems. This very recent "affective turn" has begun to map out a powerful territory of embodied cognition. Why We Need Religion incorporates new data from these affective sciences into the philosophy of religion. It goes on to describe the way in which religion manages those systems--rage, play, lust, care, grief, and so on. Finally, it argues that religion is still the best cultural apparatus for doing this adaptive work. In short, the book is a Darwinian defense of religious emotions and the cultural systems that manage them.
Consider Miles Davis, horn held high, sculpting a powerful musical statement full of tonal patterns, inside jokes, and thrilling climactic phrases—all on the fly. Or think of a comedy troupe riffing on a couple of cues from the audience until the whole room is erupting with laughter. Or maybe it’s a team of software engineers brainstorming their way to the next Google, or the Einsteins of the world code-cracking the mysteries of nature. Maybe it’s simply a child playing with her toys. What do all of these activities share? With wisdom, humor, and joy, philosopher Stephen T. Asma answers that question in this book: imagination. And from there he takes us on an extraordinary tour of the human creative spirit.

Guided by neuroscience, animal behavior, evolution, philosophy, and psychology, Asma burrows deep into the human psyche to look right at the enigmatic but powerful engine that is our improvisational creativity—the source, he argues, of our remarkable imaginational capacity. How is it, he asks, that a story can evoke a whole world inside of us? How are we able to rehearse a skill, a speech, or even an entire scenario simply by thinking about it? How does creativity go beyond experience and help us make something completely new? And how does our moral imagination help us sculpt a better society? As he shows, we live in a world that is only partly happening in reality. Huge swaths of our cognitive experiences are made up by “what-ifs,” “almosts,” and “maybes,” an imagined terrain that churns out one of the most overlooked but necessary resources for our flourishing: possibilities. Considering everything from how imagination works in our physical bodies to the ways we make images, from the mechanics of language and our ability to tell stories to the creative composition of self-consciousness, Asma expands our personal and day-to-day forms of imagination into a grand scale: as one of the decisive evolutionary forces that has guided human development from the Paleolithic era to today. The result is an inspiring look at the rich relationships among improvisation, imagination, and culture, and a privileged glimpse into the unique nature of our evolved minds.
 The father of Empiricism, the Elizabethan philosopher Francis Bacon was an advocate and practitioner of the scientific method during the scientific revolution. His pioneering works argued for the possibility of scientific knowledge based only upon inductive reasoning and careful observation of events in nature.  This comprehensive eBook presents Bacon’s collected works, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)


* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Bacon’s life and works

* Concise introductions to the major texts

* All the major works, with individual contents tables

* Features rare treatises appearing for the first time in digital publishing

* Images of how the books were first published, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts

* Excellent formatting of the texts

* Special criticism section, with essays evaluating Bacon’s contribution to philosophy and the ‘Bacon is Shakespeare’ theory

* Features three biographies - discover Bacon’s intriguing life

* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres


Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles


CONTENTS:


The Books

The Essays or Counsels, Civil and Moral

The Colours of Good and Evil

Meditationes Sacrae

Valerius Terminus of the Interpretation of Nature

The Advancement and Proficience of Learning Divine and Human

In Felicem Memoriam Elizabethae

De Sapientia Veterum

Instauratio Magna

Novum Organum Scientiarum

History of the Reign of King Henry VII

Translation of Certain Psalms into English Verse

Preparative toward a Natural and Experimental History

New Atlantis

Sylva Sylvarvm

Theological Tracts

The Union of the Two Kingdoms of Scotland and England


The Criticism

Bacon is Shake-Speare by Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence

Shakespeare, Bacon, and the Great Unknown by Andrew Lang

Forty Years of Bacon-Shakespeare Folly by John Fiske

The Classification of the Sciences — Francis Bacon by Walter Libby


The Biographies

Bacon by R. W. Church

The Mystery of Francis Bacon by William T. Smedley

Brief Biography: Francis Bacon by Robert Adamson


Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles or to purchase this eBook as a Parts Edition of individual eBooks


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