As a group of islands in the far south-west Pacific Ocean, New Zealand has a history that is steeped in the sea. Its people have encountered the sea in many different ways: along the coast, in port, on ships, beneath the waves, behind a camera, and in the realm of the imagination. While New Zealanders have continually altered their marine environments, the ocean, too, has influenced their lives.

A multi-disciplinary work encompassing history, marine science, archaeology and visual culture, New Zealand and the Sea explores New Zealand’s varied relationship with the sea, challenging the conventional view that history unfolds on land. Leading and emerging scholars highlight the dynamic, ocean-centred history of these islands and their inhabitants, offering fascinating new perspectives on New Zealand’s pasts.

‘The ocean has profoundly shaped culture across this narrow archipelago . . . The meeting of land and sea is central in historical accounts of Polynesian discovery and colonisation; European exploratory voyaging; sealing, whaling and the littoral communities that supported these plural occupations; and the mass migrant passage from Britain.’ – Frances Steel

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About the author

Frances Steel is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Wollongong. Her research connects histories of empire, mobility and the sea in the Pacific World. She is the author of Oceania under Steam: Sea Transport and the Cultures of Colonialism, c.1870–1914 (Manchester University Press, 2011), and with Julia Martínez, Claire Lowrie and Victoria Haskins, Colonialism and Male Domestic Service across the Asia Pacific (Bloomsbury, 2018).

Atholl Anderson is an Emeritus Professor of the Australian National University where he held the Chair of Prehistory in the Institute of Advanced Studies, and was earlier Professor of Anthropology at the University of Otago. He worked for more than forty years across the Pacific and Indian oceans and is a specialist in seafaring and island colonisation.

Tony Ballantyne is a Professor of History and Pro-Vice Chancellor Humanities at the University of Otago, where he is also Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture. He has published widely on the cultural history of the British Empire, colonial historiographies, and histories of mobility and exchange. His most recent sole-authored book is the award-winning Entanglements of Empire: Missionaries, Māori and the Question of the Body (Duke University Press, 2015).


Julie Benjamin gained a PhD in Media Film and Television from the University of Auckland in 2009. She is creating a series of videos based on the life histories of thirteen South Island West Coasters, and lives in Onehunga, beside the Manukau Harbour.


Douglas Booth is Emeritus Professor of Sport Studies at the University of Otago and an Honorary Professor at the University of Queensland. He is the author of The Race Game: Sport and Politics in South Africa (F. Cass, 1998), Australian Beach Cultures: The History of Sun, Sand and Surf (F. Cass, 2001) and The Field: Truth and Fiction in Sport History (Routledge, 2005). Douglas serves on the editorial boards of Rethinking History and the Journal of Sport History and is an executive member of the Australian Society for Sport History.


Chris Brickell is an Associate Professor in Gender Studies at Otago University. He has published several books on histories of masculinity and sexuality, all of them with a focus on visual materials. They include Mates & Lovers: A History of Gay New Zealand (Random House, 2008) and Manly Affections: The Photographs of Robert Gant, 1885–1915 (Genre Books, 2012). Chris’s recent work also deals with histories of affect and adolescence. His most recent monograph is Teenagers: The Rise of Youth Culture in New Zealand (Auckland University Press, 2017), and he is currently co-editing a book on queer objects.

Peter Gilderdale is Associate Head (Research) in AUT’s School of Art and Design, where he was previously Head of the Graphic Design Department for sixteen years. He originally studied Art History and Ancient History, has worked as

a professional calligrapher and is a calligraphic historian. In 2013 he completed a design historical PhD centred on Hands Across the Sea postcards. Since then he has extended aspects of that work to publish articles on the emotional aspects of postcard usage amongst immigrants, and on the early New Zealand Christmas card trade.

David Haines is a New Zealand historian who works at the Waitangi Tribunal. He is the author of several articles on Māori participation in the New Zealand whaling industry, including ‘In Search of the “Whaheen”: Ngāi Tahu Women, Shore Whalers, and the Meaning of Sex in Early New Zealand’ in Tony Ballantyne and Antoinette Burton (eds), Moving Subjects: Gender, Intimacy and Mobility in an Age of Global Empire (University of Illinois Press, 2009).

Susann Liebich is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies, Heidelberg University. Her research interests combine maritime history, book history and the history of print culture, and mobility studies, and her

current project examines reading and writing at sea. Her co-authored monograph, The Transported Imagination (Cambria, 2018), explores the geographical imaginaries of the Pacific in Australian leisure and culture magazines of the 1920s and

1930s.

Alison MacDiarmid is a marine ecologist and helps manage the Wellington campus of New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA). Alison’s research interests include the whole range of human impacts on marine ecosystems since first settlement of New Zealand to the present day. She is on the Executive Committee of the Oceans Past Initiative, an international grouping of marine ecologists, historians and archaeologists, and since 2015 has

co-convened Oceans Past conferences in Estonia, Portugal, and Germany.

Ben Maddison is a Senior Research Fellow in history at the University of Wollongong, and a Research Associate at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies. He has voyaged across the Southern Ocean to Antarctica many times. These voyages, and his background in working class and colonial history, framed his book Class and Colonialism in Antarctic Exploration 1750–1920 (Pickering and Chatto, 2014). He is currently writing a history of the Southern Ocean.

Angela McCarthy is Professor of Scottish and Irish History and Director of the Centre for Global Migrations at the University of Otago. She has published widely on the migration experiences of the Irish and the Scots, including aspects of their voyages to new lands.

Grace Millar completed her PhD entitled ‘Families and the 1951 New Zealand Waterfront Lockout’ at Victoria University, Wellington, in 2014. She was chair of the New Zealand Labour History Project from 2015 to 2017. In 2017 she moved to the University of Wolverhampton as a Post-Doctoral Fellow to work on the project ‘On Behalf of The People: Work, Community, and Class in the British Coal Industry 1947–1994’.

Damon Salesa is a scholar of Pacific politics, history, technology, culture and society. His work includes the prizewinning book Racial Crossings: Race, Intermarriage and the Victorian British Empire (Oxford University Press, 2011), a number of academic chapters and articles, and he was co-editor of Tangata o le Moana: New Zealand and the People of the Pacific (Te Papa Press, 2012). He is currently completing a Marsden research project on technological, social and cultural change in Samoa. A Samoan born and raised in Auckland, he is currently University Director of Pacific Strategy and Engagement and Associate Professor of Pacific Studies at the University of Auckland.

Jonathan Scott is Professor of History at the University of Auckland. He was previously Fellow and Director of Studies in History at Downing College, Cambridge (1991–2002) and then Carroll Amundson Professor of British History at the University of Pittsburgh (until 2009). He is the author of several studies for Cambridge University Press, most recently When the Waves Ruled Britannia: Geography and Political Identities 1500–1800 (Cambridge University Press, 2011). His How the Old World Ended: The Anglo-Dutch-American Archipelago, 1500–1800 will be published by Yale University Press, London, in 2019.

Michael J. Stevens (nō Kāi Tahu ki Awarua) is a freelance historian and formerly Senior Lecturer in Māori History in the Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago. Michael was raised in Bluff and in 2013 was awarded a three-year Marsden Fast Start research grant to write a world history of the port town.

Jonathan West is a New Zealand historian broadly interested in the intersections of environmental, economic and cultural change. His book The Face of Nature: An Environmental History of the Otago Peninsula was published by Otago University Press in 2017. Raised in Dunedin and a keen tramper, he has written also on issues involving wilderness and the high country in the South Island. He next intends to write an environmental history of New Zealand’s lakes.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
Dec 31, 2018
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Pages
384
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ISBN
9780947518714
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Australia & New Zealand
History / Oceania
History / Social History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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