The Century for Young People: 1901-1936: Becoming Modern America

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Experience the greatest moments of the 20th century with an accessible narrative that makes history come alive.

Adapted from the #1 national bestseller especially for young readers!

The twentieth century was a time of tremendous change, the most eventful hundred years in human history. Join Peter Jennings and Todd Brewster for a fascinating journey back in time to experience, through vivid first-person accounts, the most surprising and the most terrifying events of the past hundred years. These are the voices of ordinary people--children and adults--who were part of history in the making. Their joys and sorrows, their hopes and fears provide a compelling insider's look at momentous events that have reshaped the world. The Century for Young People is a riveting read and an essential research resource. It is the story of our time for all time.
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About the author

Peter Jennings (1938-2005) was chief anchor of ABC's World News Tonight. In more than forty years as a broadcast journalist, he worked in most parts of the world, from the American South to Southern Africa, from the Middle East to eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Among the hundreds of programs he was a part of, he treasured those he had done with and for the young.

Todd Brewster was the senior editorial producer of ABC's The Century television series. In more than twenty-five years as a journalist, he has covered the American national political scene and the collapse of Communism in eastern Europe, both for Life, where he was a writer and editor. He is currently the new director of he Center for Oral History at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Delacorte Books for Young Readers
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Published on
Sep 22, 2009
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Pages
128
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ISBN
9780375893957
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Language
English
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Genres
Juvenile Nonfiction / Biography & Autobiography / Historical
Juvenile Nonfiction / History / United States / 20th Century
Juvenile Nonfiction / People & Places / United States / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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“A masterful psychological portrait” (George Stephanopoulos) of the most critical six months in Abraham Lincoln’s presidency, when he wrote the Emancipation Proclamation and changed the course of the Civil War.

On July 12, 1862, Abraham Lincoln spoke for the first time of his intention to free the slaves. On January 1, 1863, Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, doing precisely that. In between, however, was a tumultuous six months, an episode during which the sixteenth president fought bitterly with his generals, disappointed his cabinet, and sank into painful bouts of clinical depression. Most surprising, the man who would be remembered as “The Great Emancipator” did not hold firm to his belief in emancipation. He agonized over the decision and was wracked by private doubts almost to the moment when he inked the decree that would change a nation. It was a great gamble, with the future of the Union, of slavery, and of the presidency itself hanging in the balance.

In this compelling narrative, Todd Brewster focuses on this crucial time period to ask: was it through will or by accident, intention or coincidence, personal achievement or historical determinism that he freed the slaves? “Brewster brings elegant clarity to the tangle of conflicting ideologies, loyalties, and practicalities that pushed the proclamation forward” (Publishers Weekly), portraying the president as an imperfect man with an unshakable determination to save a country he believed in, even as the course of the Civil War remained unknown.
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