Saving Eagle Mitch: One Good Deed in a Wicked World

SUNY Press
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When a Navy SEAL and former Army Ranger rescue a
wounded eagle in war-torn Afghanistan, a writer learns what it can take to do
one good deed in a seemingly wicked world.<br><br>

In the spring of 2010, as the
world’s economy faced a potential meltdown and the United States tried to win
one war and maneuver its way out of another, one lone Steppe Eagle, shot down on
a firing range in Afghanistan, faced problems of his own. Fortunately, help was
available from former Army Ranger Scott Hickman and his buddy, Navy SEAL Greg
Wright, who took him in and gave him the healing he needed. They named him
Mitch.<br><br>
It wasn’t long, though, before they realized they had to find Mitch a
safer home than the war zone they were in. Through the strange synchronicities
of time, place, and the Internet, they got in touch with the one man just crazy
enough to try to help—Pete Dubacher, founder of the Berkshire Bird Paradise, in
upstate New York. Dubacher, in turn, enlisted the aid of Barbara Chepaitis, who
was just celebrating the release of her book Feathers of Hope, about
Pete and his bird sanctuary. Thinking it would be an easy task, she quickly
agreed to help, but she soon found out that although saving an eagle might seem
like a no-brainer, there were plenty of people ready to tell her it couldn’t be
done.<br><br>
Faced with a host of bureaucratic and regulatory obstacles, Chepaitis
soon found herself cold-calling the White House and the Department of State,
while simultaneously utilizing Internet media, the press, and social networks to
try to accomplish one good deed in a world that looked more wicked every day.
Along the way, she learned a great deal about the nature of personal power, as
well as the nature of institutions that usually present themselves as faceless
and indifferent to individual needs.<br><br>
Saving Eagle Mitch offers a
unique view into what happens when matters of the heart come into conflict with
rules and regulations, and offers hope for the possibility that one person can
make a difference in a troubled and confusing world. Inspirational and full of
grit and fire, the book explores not only what needs to be done, but why such
seemingly small acts of grace are necessary to create a larger good.
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About the author

Barbara Chepaitis is the Fiction Director for the Western State College of Colorado’s graduate program in creative writing. She is the author of many books, including Feathers of Hope: Pete Dubacher, the Berkshire Bird Paradise, and the Human Connection with Birds, also published by SUNY Press. She lives in Altamont, New York.
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Mar 4, 2013
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Pages
128
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ISBN
9781438446684
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / Afghan War (2001-)
Nature / Animals / Birds
Nature / Birdwatching Guides
Nature / Environmental Conservation & Protection
SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Zoology / Ornithology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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From the Hardcover edition.
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