Understanding Wine Chemistry

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Wine chemistry inspires and challenges with its complexity, and while this is intriguing, it can also be a barrier to further understanding. The topic is demystified in Understanding Wine Chemistry, which explains the important chemistry of wine at the level of university education, and provides an accessible reference text for scientists and scientifically trained winemakers alike.

Understanding Wine Chemistry:

  • Summarizes the compounds found in wine, their basic chemical properties and their contribution to wine stability and sensory properties
  • Focuses on chemical and biochemical reaction mechanisms that are critical to wine production processes such as fermentation, aging, physiochemical separations and additions
  • Includes case studies showing how chemistry can be harnessed to enhance wine color, aroma, flavor, balance, stability and quality.

This descriptive text provides an overview of wine components and explains the key chemical reactions they undergo, such as those controlling the transformation of grape components, those that arise during fermentation, and the evolution of wine flavor and color. The book aims to guide the reader, who perhaps only has a basic knowledge of chemistry, to rationally explain or predict the outcomes of chemical reactions that contribute to the diversity observed among wines. This will help students, winemakers and other interested individuals to anticipate the effects of wine treatments and processes, or interpret experimental results based on an understanding of the major chemical reactions that can occur in wine.

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About the author

Professor Andrew L. Waterhouse, Department of Viticulture & Enology, University of California, Davis, USA.
Andrew Waterhouse received his PhD in organic chemistry from UC Berkeley, and has been a wine chemist at the University of California, Davis since 1991. He teaches wine analysis, graduate level wine chemistry, and an online introductory wine course, and is Chair of the Viticulture and Enology graduate studies program. Former graduate students and postdocs are academics, industry scientists and winemakers. His research lab has reported key wine oxidation reactions and has developed new methods to analyse wine components including those using LC-MS with isotope filtering, as well as NMR techniques. The research has focused on wine phenolics, oak compounds and oxidation products. In addition his lab has also been addressing the metabolic products of phenolics. He publishes in numerous international journals in the fields of chemistry and agriculture, and serves as a chief editor at the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. See: waterhouse.ucdavis.edu.

Dr Gavin Sacks, Department of Food Science, Cornell University, USA.
Gavin Sacks received his PhD in analytical chemistry from Cornell University, and following post-doctoral studies in nutritional sciences and biogeochemistry he began as a faculty in food science at Cornell in 2007. He has served as Director of Undergraduate Studies for Cornell’s interdepartmental Viticulture and Enology undergraduate major, in which he also teaches courses in wine analysis and in wine flavor chemistry. His research interests include the development of both low-cost and state-of-the-art approaches to analysis of odorants and other organoleptically important compounds; and applying these tools to understanding the role of plant genetics, cultural practices, and post-harvest processing on sensory attributes of foods and beverages, particularly of wine.

Dr David Jeffery, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, USA.
David Jeffery received his PhD in synthetic organic chemistry from Flinders University, and has been involved with wine chemistry for over a decade, initially as a researcher at The Australian Wine Research Institute before transitioning to The University of Adelaide in 2010. He teaches wine chemistry to undergraduate and Master level students, delivering topics associated with stabilization, clarification, distillation, wine aroma, polyphenols, and analytical methods. He also helped to develop and deliver a free online wine education course called Wine 101x, offered on the EdX platform. David’s research areas extend to on many aspects of wine chemistry, with special interests in polyphenols and aroma compounds and their precursors. He utilizes his expertise in synthetic organic chemistry and natural product isolation, purification and characterization, along with experience in developing and applying analytical methods, to improve understanding of grape and wine chemistry, particularly in relation to chemical composition and quality.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Jun 7, 2016
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Pages
472
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ISBN
9781118730706
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Chemistry / Analytic
Science / Life Sciences / Horticulture
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Michael Pollan
The book that helped make Michael Pollan, the New York Times bestselling author of Cooked and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, one of the most trusted food experts in America

In 1637, one Dutchman paid as much for a single tulip bulb as the going price of a town house in Amsterdam. Three and a half centuries later, Amsterdam is once again the mecca for people who care passionately about one particular plant—though this time the obsessions revolves around the intoxicating effects of marijuana rather than the visual beauty of the tulip. How could flowers, of all things, become such objects of desire that they can drive men to financial ruin?

In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan argues that the answer lies at the heart of the intimately reciprocal relationship between people and plants. In telling the stories of four familiar plant species that are deeply woven into the fabric of our lives, Pollan illustrates how they evolved to satisfy humankinds’s most basic yearnings—and by doing so made themselves indispensable. For, just as we’ve benefited from these plants, the plants, in the grand co-evolutionary scheme that Pollan evokes so brilliantly, have done well by us. The sweetness of apples, for example, induced the early Americans to spread the species, giving the tree a whole new continent in which to blossom. So who is really domesticating whom?

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From the Hardcover edition.
ASHUTOSH PRAMANIK
This book [earlier titled as Electromagnetism: Theory and Applications which is bifurcated into two volumes: Electromagnetism: Theory and Electromagnetism: Applications (Magnetic Diffusion and Electromagnetic Waves) has been updated to cover some additional aspects of theory and nearly all modern applications. The semi-historical approach is unchanged, but further historical comments have been introduced at various places in the book to give a better insight into the development of the subject as well as to make the study more interesting and palatable to the students. Key Features • Physical explanations of different types of currents • Concepts of complex permittivity and complex permeability; and anisotropic behaviour of constitute parameters in different media and different conditions • Vector co-ordinate system transformation equations • Halbach magnets and the theory of one-sided flux • Discussion on physical aspects of demagnetization curve of B-H loop for ferromagnetic materials • Extrapolation of Frohlich-Kennely equation used for the design and analysis of permanent magnet applications • Physical aspects of Faraday’s law of electromagnetic induction (i.e., Fourth Maxwell’s field equation) through the approach of special relativity • Extrapolation and elaboration of the concept of electromechanical energy conversion to both magnetic as well as electric field systems Appendices contain in-depth analysis of self-inductance and non-conservative fields (Appendix 6), proof regarding the boundary conditions (Appendix 8), theory of bicylindrical co-ordinate system to provide the physical basis of the circuit approach to the cylindrical transmission line systems (Appendix 10), and properties of useful functions like Bessel and Legendre functions (Appendix 9). The book is designed to serve as a core text for students of electrical engineering. Besides, it will be useful to postgraduate physics students as well as research engineers and design and development engineers in industries.
Andrew L. Waterhouse
Wine chemistry inspires and challenges with its complexity, and while this is intriguing, it can also be a barrier to further understanding. The topic is demystified in Understanding Wine Chemistry, which explains the important chemistry of wine at the level of university education, and provides an accessible reference text for scientists and scientifically trained winemakers alike.

Understanding Wine Chemistry:

Summarizes the compounds found in wine, their basic chemical properties and their contribution to wine stability and sensory properties Focuses on chemical and biochemical reaction mechanisms that are critical to wine production processes such as fermentation, aging, physiochemical separations and additions Includes case studies showing how chemistry can be harnessed to enhance wine color, aroma, flavor, balance, stability and quality.

This descriptive text provides an overview of wine components and explains the key chemical reactions they undergo, such as those controlling the transformation of grape components, those that arise during fermentation, and the evolution of wine flavor and color. The book aims to guide the reader, who perhaps only has a basic knowledge of chemistry, to rationally explain or predict the outcomes of chemical reactions that contribute to the diversity observed among wines. This will help students, winemakers and other interested individuals to anticipate the effects of wine treatments and processes, or interpret experimental results based on an understanding of the major chemical reactions that can occur in wine.

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