Milestones: Normal Speech and Language Development Across the Lifespan

Plural Publishing
Free sample

This textbook for the introductory course in Language Development adopts a coherent chronological approach, beginning with responsiveness to speech and language in the womb and working across the lifespan into maturity and beyond which helps students relate the material to the whole person at each milestone. The organizational background becomes a series of interesting cases, keeping the theory and structure of language development grounded in real stories.

In the second edition, the authors have enhanced and updated the cutting-edge information on early language development, literacy acquisition, and some of the factors that can delay or even derail the normal progression. They have amplified innovations that students found useful in the first edition while updating the text with respect to current research and theory. The organization of the text has been streamlined, and some of the theory and research has been clarified and illustrated with additional or updated videographic illustrations.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Plural Publishing
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Published on
Dec 20, 2012
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Pages
624
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ISBN
9781597566797
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Audiology & Speech Pathology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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John W. Oller
Cloze procedure is a family of testing and teaching methods that leave blanks in discourse and ask examinees to restore the missing elements. Edited and coauthored by award-winning scholars, Cloze and Coherence shows how and why cloze procedure is sensitive to discourse constraints, and it offers a comprehensive theory of semiotics showing what coherence is and reviewing a great deal of cloze research. It traces in particular the history of cloze research pertaining to studies of coherence from Hermann Ebbinghaus in the 1890s to Wilson L. Taylor in the 1950s until today.
The research presented here aims to show that cloze scores tend to fall if discourse constraints are disrupted. Also explored are many subtle questions associated with this tendency. Populations discussed include native and nonnative speakers of English, native and nonnative speakers of French, and certain special populations such as deaf subjects and educable mentally retarded subjects.
Contrary to some experts, it appears from the theory and the research that all of the normal subject populations as well as the special populations examined here benefit from the cognitive momentum gained from the episodic organization of ordinary discourse. This finding is sustained by research from Taylor, Oller et al., Cziko, Bachman, Jonz, and Taira. Further, some of Jonz's recent work shows why scrambling encyclopedic text (Timothy Shanahan and colleagues) failed to produce any significant decrement in cloze scores.
Jonz demonstrated empirically that some texts (just as Gary A. Cziko had predicted) are not made more difficult by scrambling their sentences because the sentences of those texts are, in some cases, arranged in the manner of a list rather than a logically or chronologically structured series. Scrambling the list, therefore, has no significant impact. The final chapter of this study gives a comprehensive review of research reportedly showing that cloze is not sensitive to coherence. The authors show that all those efforts suffer from fatal flaws.
Cloze and Coherence offers advances of two kinds. First, a better theoretical basis for experimental research on discourse comprehension and on literacy and language acquisition is presented, which stems from a fleshed-out semiotic theory. Second, experimental advances, whose results are published here for the first time, appear in various studies by Jonz, Chihara et al., Oller et al., and Taira.
This work is well researched and illustrated. It includes figures, tables, appendices, a glossary, and an index. It will be a valuable tool for language and literacy testers and teachers.
John W. Oller
Cloze procedure is a family of testing and teaching methods that leave blanks in discourse and ask examinees to restore the missing elements. Edited and coauthored by award-winning scholars, Cloze and Coherence shows how and why cloze procedure is sensitive to discourse constraints, and it offers a comprehensive theory of semiotics showing what coherence is and reviewing a great deal of cloze research. It traces in particular the history of cloze research pertaining to studies of coherence from Hermann Ebbinghaus in the 1890s to Wilson L. Taylor in the 1950s until today.
The research presented here aims to show that cloze scores tend to fall if discourse constraints are disrupted. Also explored are many subtle questions associated with this tendency. Populations discussed include native and nonnative speakers of English, native and nonnative speakers of French, and certain special populations such as deaf subjects and educable mentally retarded subjects.
Contrary to some experts, it appears from the theory and the research that all of the normal subject populations as well as the special populations examined here benefit from the cognitive momentum gained from the episodic organization of ordinary discourse. This finding is sustained by research from Taylor, Oller et al., Cziko, Bachman, Jonz, and Taira. Further, some of Jonz's recent work shows why scrambling encyclopedic text (Timothy Shanahan and colleagues) failed to produce any significant decrement in cloze scores.
Jonz demonstrated empirically that some texts (just as Gary A. Cziko had predicted) are not made more difficult by scrambling their sentences because the sentences of those texts are, in some cases, arranged in the manner of a list rather than a logically or chronologically structured series. Scrambling the list, therefore, has no significant impact. The final chapter of this study gives a comprehensive review of research reportedly showing that cloze is not sensitive to coherence. The authors show that all those efforts suffer from fatal flaws.
Cloze and Coherence offers advances of two kinds. First, a better theoretical basis for experimental research on discourse comprehension and on literacy and language acquisition is presented, which stems from a fleshed-out semiotic theory. Second, experimental advances, whose results are published here for the first time, appear in various studies by Jonz, Chihara et al., Oller et al., and Taira.
This work is well researched and illustrated. It includes figures, tables, appendices, a glossary, and an index. It will be a valuable tool for language and literacy testers and teachers.
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