Last Exit: Privatization and Deregulation of the U.S. Transportation System

Brookings Institution Press
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In Last Exit Clifford Winston reminds us that transportation services and infrastructure in the United States were originally introduced by private firms. The case for subsequent public ownership and management of the system was weak, in his view, and here he assesses the case for privatization and deregulation to greatly improve Americans' satisfaction with their transportation systems.
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About the author

Clifford Winston is a senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution. His previous books include Aviation Infrastructure Performance and Government Failure versus Market Failure, both published by Brookings.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
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Published on
Sep 1, 2010
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Pages
188
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ISBN
9780815704768
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / General
Business & Economics / Industries / Transportation
Transportation / Public Transportation
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Not many Americans think of the legal profession as a monopoly, but it is. Abraham Lincoln, who practiced law for nearly twenty-five years, would likely not have been allowed to practice today. Without a law degree from an American Bar Association–sanctioned institution, a would-be lawyer is allowed to practice law in only a few states. ABA regulations also prevent even licensed lawyers who work for firms that are not owned and managed by lawyers from providing legal services. At the same time, a slate of government policies has increased the demand for lawyers' services. Basic economics suggests that those entry barriers and restrictions combined with government-induced demand for lawyers will continue to drive the price of legal services even higher.

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