Greeks and Barbarians

Routledge
Free sample

Greeks and Barbarians examines ancient Greek conceptions of the "other." The attitudes of Greeks to foreigners and there religions, and cultures, and politics reveals as much about the Greeks as it does the world they inhabited. Despite occasional interest in particular aspects of foreign customs, the Greeks were largely hostile and dismissive viewing foreigners as at best inferior, but more often as candidates for conquest and enslavement.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Jan 15, 2018
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Pages
288
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ISBN
9781351565035
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Ancient / General
History / Ancient / Rome
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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