Governing Hate and Race in the United States and South Africa

SUNY Press
Free sample

In this book, Patrick Lynn Rivers asserts that states govern racist hate by governing racial constructs. Rivers maintains that state practices used to govern hate and race in both the United States and South Africa do not make citizens safer, even as the United States markets itself as a “melting pot” of cultures and South Africa touts its status as the new multicultural “city on a hill.” In effect, the regulatory practices of the neoliberal state aid in the redirection of responsibility for the eradication of racist hate away from the nation and toward the hated, leaving unaddressed the systemic causes of hate. In line with emerging scholarship on hate, but also taking advantage of the perspective that comparative analysis makes possible, Rivers advocates a particular brand of progressive activism for a socially engaged state and citizenry where race is central and racism is not anomalous.
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About the author

Patrick Lynn Rivers is Associate Professor of Visual and Critical Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Aug 20, 2008
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Pages
190
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ISBN
9780791477847
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
Social Science / Discrimination & Race Relations
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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