Introduction to Homological Algebra, 85

Academic Press
1
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An Introduction to Homological Algebra discusses the origins of algebraic topology. It also presents the study of homological algebra as a two-stage affair. First, one must learn the language of Ext and Tor and what it describes. Second, one must be able to compute these things, and often, this involves yet another language: spectral sequences. Homological algebra is an accessible subject to those who wish to learn it, and this book is the author’s attempt to make it lovable.
This book comprises 11 chapters, with an introductory chapter that focuses on line integrals and independence of path, categories and functors, tensor products, and singular homology. Succeeding chapters discuss Hom and X; projectives, injectives, and flats; specific rings; extensions of groups; homology; Ext; Tor; son of specific rings; the return of cohomology of groups; and spectral sequences, such as bicomplexes, Kunneth Theorems, and Grothendieck Spectral Sequences.
This book will be of interest to practitioners in the field of pure and applied mathematics.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Academic Press
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Published on
Sep 7, 1979
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Pages
400
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ISBN
9780080874012
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Language
English
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Genres
Mathematics / Algebra / General
Mathematics / Topology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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This book is designed as a text for the first year of graduate algebra, but it can also serve as a reference since it contains more advanced topics as well. This second edition has a different organization than the first. It begins with a discussion of the cubic and quartic equations, which leads into permutations, group theory, and Galois theory (for finite extensions; infinite Galois theory is discussed later in the book). The study of groups continues with finite abelian groups (finitely generated groups are discussed later, in the context of module theory), Sylow theorems, simplicity of projective unimodular groups, free groups and presentations, and the Nielsen-Schreier theorem (subgroups of free groups are free). The study of commutative rings continues with prime and maximal ideals, unique factorization, noetherian rings, Zorn's lemma and applications, varieties, and Grobner bases. Next, noncommutative rings and modules are discussed, treating tensor product, projective, injective, and flat modules, categories, functors, and natural transformations, categorical constructions (including direct and inverse limits), and adjoint functors. Then follow group representations: Wedderburn-Artin theorems, character theory, theorems of Burnside and Frobenius, division rings, Brauer groups, and abelian categories. Advanced linear algebra treats canonical forms for matrices and the structure of modules over PIDs, followed by multilinear algebra. Homology is introduced, first for simplicial complexes, then as derived functors, with applications to Ext, Tor, and cohomology of groups, crossed products, and an introduction to algebraic $K$-theory. Finally, the author treats localization, Dedekind rings and algebraic number theory, and homological dimensions. The book ends with the proof that regular local rings have unique factorization.
According to the authors of this highly useful compendium, focusing on examples is an extremely effective method of involving undergraduate mathematics students in actual research. It is only as a result of pursuing the details of each example that students experience a significant increment in topological understanding. With that in mind, Professors Steen and Seebach have assembled 143 examples in this book, providing innumerable concrete illustrations of definitions, theorems, and general methods of proof. Far from presenting all relevant examples, however, the book instead provides a fruitful context in which to ask new questions and seek new answers.
Ranging from the familiar to the obscure, the examples are preceded by a succinct exposition of general topology and basic terminology and theory. Each example is treated as a whole, with a highly geometric exposition that helps readers comprehend the material. Over 25 Venn diagrams and reference charts summarize the properties of the examples and allow students to scan quickly for examples with prescribed properties. In addition, discussions of general methods of constructing and changing examples acquaint readers with the art of constructing counterexamples. The authors have included an extensive collection of problems and exercises, all correlated with various examples, and a bibliography of 140 sources, tracing each uncommon example to its origin.
This revised and expanded second edition will be especially useful as a course supplement and reference work for students of general topology. Moreover, it gives the instructor the flexibility to design his own course while providing students with a wealth of historically and mathematically significant examples. 1978 edition.
This book is designed as a text for the first year of graduate algebra, but it can also serve as a reference since it contains more advanced topics as well. This second edition has a different organization than the first. It begins with a discussion of the cubic and quartic equations, which leads into permutations, group theory, and Galois theory (for finite extensions; infinite Galois theory is discussed later in the book). The study of groups continues with finite abelian groups (finitely generated groups are discussed later, in the context of module theory), Sylow theorems, simplicity of projective unimodular groups, free groups and presentations, and the Nielsen-Schreier theorem (subgroups of free groups are free). The study of commutative rings continues with prime and maximal ideals, unique factorization, noetherian rings, Zorn's lemma and applications, varieties, and Grobner bases. Next, noncommutative rings and modules are discussed, treating tensor product, projective, injective, and flat modules, categories, functors, and natural transformations, categorical constructions (including direct and inverse limits), and adjoint functors. Then follow group representations: Wedderburn-Artin theorems, character theory, theorems of Burnside and Frobenius, division rings, Brauer groups, and abelian categories. Advanced linear algebra treats canonical forms for matrices and the structure of modules over PIDs, followed by multilinear algebra. Homology is introduced, first for simplicial complexes, then as derived functors, with applications to Ext, Tor, and cohomology of groups, crossed products, and an introduction to algebraic $K$-theory. Finally, the author treats localization, Dedekind rings and algebraic number theory, and homological dimensions. The book ends with the proof that regular local rings have unique factorization.
Homological Algebra has grown in the nearly three decades since the rst e- tion of this book appeared in 1979. Two books discussing more recent results are Weibel, An Introduction to Homological Algebra, 1994, and Gelfand– Manin, Methods of Homological Algebra, 2003. In their Foreword, Gelfand and Manin divide the history of Homological Algebra into three periods: the rst period ended in the early 1960s, culminating in applications of Ho- logical Algebra to regular local rings. The second period, greatly in uenced by the work of A. Grothendieck and J. -P. Serre, continued through the 1980s; it involves abelian categories and sheaf cohomology. The third period, - volving derived categories and triangulated categories, is still ongoing. Both of these newer books discuss all three periods (see also Kashiwara–Schapira, Categories and Sheaves). The original version of this book discussed the rst period only; this new edition remains at the same introductory level, but it now introduces the second period as well. This change makes sense pe- gogically, for there has been a change in the mathematics population since 1979; today, virtually all mathematics graduate students have learned so- thing about functors and categories, and so I can now take the categorical viewpoint more seriously. When I was a graduate student, Homological Algebra was an unpopular subject. The general attitude was that it was a grotesque formalism, boring to learn, and not very useful once one had learned it.
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