Neo-race Realities in the Obama Era

SUNY Press
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Considers the impact of neo-racism during the Obama presidency.


Neo-race Realities in the Obama Era expands the discourse about Barack Obama’s two terms as president by reflecting upon the impact of neo-racism during his tenure. Continually in conversation with Étienne Balibar’s conceptualization of neo-racism as being racism without race, the contributors examine how identities become the target of neo-racist discriminatory practices and policies in the United States. Individual chapters explore how President Obama’s multiple and intersecting identities beyond the racial binaries of Black and White were perceived, as well as how his presence impacted certain marginalized groups in our society as a result of his administration’s policies. Evidencing the hegemonic complexity of neo-racism in the United States, the contributors illustrate how the mythic post-race society that many wished for on election night in 2008 was deferred, in order to return to the uncomfortable comfort zone of the way America used to be.


“Well organized and compelling, this book covers everything from perspectives on the AIDS epidemic to racial authenticity, yet the reader never forgets that he/she is on a journey through the Age of Obama and its many contested nuances.” — Ricky L. Jones, author of What’s Wrong with Obamamania? Black America, Black Leadership, and the Death of Political Imagination

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About the author

Heather E. Harris is Professor of Communication at Stevenson University. She is coeditor (with Kimberly R. Moffitt and Catherine R. Squires) of The Obama Effect: Multidisciplinary Renderings of the 2008 Campaign, also published by SUNY Press.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
May 1, 2019
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Pages
174
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ISBN
9781438474168
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Discrimination & Race Relations
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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