One Pill Makes You Stronger: The Drug That Scorched My Soul

Transformation Media Books
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 Miracle drug or deal with the devil?

After forty years of marriage, Jill and Don Stegman had it all—two beautiful children, a stable relationship, fulfilling careers. But a brush with cancer and subsequent complications upended their lives. Don survived the cancer but was saddled with a sinister sidekick that transformed this gentle Dr. Jekyll into an evil Mr. Hyde: a white pill called prednisone. What was supposed to save him instead killed him—by his own hand.

With 44 million prescriptions written per year, for everything from allergies to immune system disorders, prednisone is something of a miracle drug. But the side effects—mania, psychosis, depression—took Don's life and nearly ruined Jill's.

In the months and years after Don's death, Jill reels from grief but finds her own way of coping. A memoir written in beautiful prose, One Pill Makes You Stronger is a love story, a cautionary tale, and a true testament to human resilience.

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About the author

Jill has short stories published in such literary journals as IsotopeLiterary MamaNorth Atlantic ReviewRE:ALSouth Dakota ReviewDel Sol, and Storyglossia. She has also been a finalist for the Glimmer Train Emerging Writer's Fiction Award and has been nominated for Best of the Netanthologies. She has an M.F.A. in fiction writing from Pacific University, Oregon. Her mentors have included Benjamin Percy, Mary Helen Stefaniak, and Kevin McIlvoy.

Jill lives in California on the Central Coast, near her two adult children, where she advocates for better monitoring for patients on prednisone and rides her bike—always hearing Don cheering her on. She's currently working on a novel about the unique culture of the California–Mexico border region. 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Transformation Media Books
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Published on
Mar 5, 2019
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Pages
168
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ISBN
9781941799628
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Medical (incl. Patients)
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Biography & Autobiography / Social Activists
Biography & Autobiography / Women
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Content Protection
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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