The Marine, the Lady and the Hag: An Adult Fable

Feather Books
Free sample

This loss of innocence fable is set in New York City at the height of the Vietnam war. In it an idealistic Marine confronts the horrors that await him and glimpses the societal structures that enable those horrors and are indifferent to them. It's a gripping good read (only 3000 words).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Feather Books
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Published on
Dec 31, 2017
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Pages
14
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ISBN
9780999858349
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Fantasy / General
Fiction / War & Military
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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A rich piggy lifts a beaten redneck from a sidewalk. It is a negligible act, but from it would arise riots outside the walls of Florida State Prison and a swimming through the stars. This poignant novel, alternately gritty and lyrical, is an intimate look at the lives of two men. One of them is straight; one is gay. And NO, this is not a coming out story, but it is an exploration into human loneliness and unadulterated love.

Set in the 1980’s, the gritty opening scene has Robert Newell—straight and with head-turning good looks—facing the reality of Carmen. In actuality he confronts the reality about himself—how, to escape his homelessness, he has pandered himself to her lusts. He speaks to her about wanting children and driving home after work to play with them in the backyard. She speaks of sex toys.

Bob’s beatified mother visits him in his sleep and in the morning he decides to make his move. In order to reclaim his dignity of being a man, he will again make his home in his rusting pickup truck. He hopes that one day he might obtain his dream. He acknowledges that it is a humble dream, the common dream of Everyman—the dream of wife and family.

In Atlanta a Marine he had served with in Vietnam pummels him in a beer joint and tosses him out onto the sidewalk. Blaine Shirer, a homely gay guy, has been prowling a nearby park for tricks. He stops to help Bob home.

Over weeks a sort of friendship develops—on again, off again. But eventually they manage to make a home together and celebrate the negligible milestones of one life, of the other’s and of the life they share together. But then come bullets and judgment by the righteous.

In this novel of heart and grit, Vann Turner bears witness to the dreams we seek, the love we crave and the courage we must summon to defend it from righteous wagging tongues.

 

A special fiftieth anniversary edition of Kurt Vonnegut’s masterpiece, “a desperate, painfully honest attempt to confront the monstrous crimes of the twentieth century” (Time), featuring a new introduction by Kevin Powers, author of the National Book Award finalist The Yellow Birds
 
Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time
 
Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world’s great antiwar books. Centering on the infamous World War II firebombing of Dresden, the novel is the result of what Kurt Vonnegut described as a twenty-three-year struggle to write a book about what he had witnessed as an American prisoner of war. It combines historical fiction, science fiction, autobiography, and satire in an account of the life of Billy Pilgrim, a barber’s son turned draftee turned optometrist turned alien abductee. As Vonnegut had, Billy experiences the destruction of Dresden as a POW. Unlike Vonnegut, he experiences time travel, or coming “unstuck in time.”

An instant bestseller, Slaughterhouse-Five made Kurt Vonnegut a cult hero in American literature, a reputation that only strengthened over time, despite his being banned and censored by some libraries and schools for content and language. But it was precisely those elements of Vonnegut’s writing—the political edginess, the genre-bending inventiveness, the frank violence, the transgressive wit—that have inspired generations of readers not just to look differently at the world around them but to find the confidence to say something about it. Authors as wide-ranging as Norman Mailer, John Irving, Michael Crichton, Tim O’Brien, Margaret Atwood, Elizabeth Strout, David Sedaris, Jennifer Egan, and J. K. Rowling have all found inspiration in Vonnegut’s words. Jonathan Safran Foer has described Vonnegut as “the kind of writer who made people—young people especially—want to write.” George Saunders has declared Vonnegut to be “the great, urgent, passionate American writer of our century, who offers us . . . a model of the kind of compassionate thinking that might yet save us from ourselves.”

Fifty years after its initial publication at the height of the Vietnam War, Vonnegut's portrayal of political disillusionment, PTSD, and postwar anxiety feels as relevant, darkly humorous, and profoundly affecting as ever, an enduring beacon through our own era’s uncertainties.

“Poignant and hilarious, threaded with compassion and, behind everything, the cataract of a thundering moral statement.”—The Boston Globe
This is a tale of the human heart in Ancient Rome.

It is about a RAGE that must be kept caged until the moment comes to release it. It is also about the woman who must sit by and watch it happen.

Amid political machinations, the story focuses on two characters. The first is Titus. An educated man and former Chief Magistrate to the Lombard King, he has been banished and has sought refuge in Rome where he finds himself reduced to baking clay and lime in furnaces. Only camaraderie with the lowest commoners softens his loss of all he had and loved.

Unknown to him the powerful are vying for position one against the other with Titus central to their schemes. One of those factions lifts him out of the brick factory and appoints him to a minor office.

A letter from Titus’s wife in distant Verona finds its way to him. In it she confesses to being raped and names her defiler: the King’s Master of Horse. Titus’s heart explodes with RAGE.

The other focus of the story is Adria. Unmarried, she is a middle-aged woman who teaches flute to support herself. She had first spied Titus when, at the close of the workday, he would sit in the Ad Elephantos district and read aloud to the assembled workmen and their children. When the plague struck him, she nursed him back to health and back to the brick factory. On his appointment to the Aedileship, she stayed with him as chaste companion and helpmate.

When word arrives that the Lombard forces were amassing for a siege of the city, rustics stream into its walls for safety. Providing for them falls to Titus. A senator with Germanic connections orders Titus to use his popularity with the people to get them to clamor for letting the King enter the city. On the opposite side, the Pope—loyal to the Emperor—appoints him Consul and charges him with a spirited defense.

Titus sees detriment to the people in both of those courses. He discards them. As Consul with Plenary Powers he pursues his own course: “We’ll wait out the siege within the walls.” He knows his decision will jeopardize his life once the immediate crisis has passed.

The siege befalls. In a meeting to negotiate a truce, Titus’s two personal adversaries face him: First there is the King who had stripped all that he loved from him. And then there is the King’s Master of Horse who—in Titus’s absence—had defiled his wife, his Little Flower. It was the moment for RAGE. Adria was there—Adria who loved him—Adria looking on with dread.

In this novel Vann Turner continues his poignant exploration of the human heart, how closely we bind, how the world seeks to sever, and how we all need the courage to defend what is most dear.

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