Springer Medical Textbooks Sale

Special Offer

Read more
Collapse
by Books on Google Play
This comprehensive manual details injury and violence interventions that have proven to work effectively with vulnerable populations across all stages of life. It will benefit practitioners who manage, implement, or evaluate injury or violence prevention programs; policymakers who influence injury or violence prevention through legislation and other policies; university faculty who teach coursework in injury and violence prevention; and graduate students preparing to work in or with injury or violence prevention programs.

The Handbook on Injury and Violence Prevention is a must read for all who strive to make our world safer and healthier. Julie Louise Gerberding, MD, MPH, Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Injuries kill and maim millions each year, and seriously impact the lives of countless loved ones. Yet until recently they’ve been considered a random, normal part of life. Preventing injuries, on the other hand, requires not only effective communication with the public, but also a reliable framework for creating and evaluating suitable interventions.

The Handbook of Injury and Violence Prevention is the first book to address both halves of this challenge, reviewing evidence-based intervention programs in depth so professionals can identify successful, promising, and ineffective (and potentially harmful) prevention strategies. Over fifty experts present the current landscape of intervention methods - from risk reduction to rethinking social norms - as they address some of the most prevalent forms of accidental and violent injury, as well as emerging areas.

- Overview chapters examine the social and economic scope of unintentional and violent injury today

- Extensive literature review of specific intervention programs to prevent violence and injury

- Special chapters on childhood injuries, alcohol-related accidents, and disasters

- "Interventions in the Field" section offers solid guidelines for implementing and improving existing programs

- Critical analysis of issues involved in delivering programs to wider audiences

- Helpful appendices list relevant agencies and professional resources

This dual focus on intervention and application makes the Handbook a bedrock text for professionals involved in delivering or managing prevention programs. Its what-works-now approach gives it particular utility in the graduate classroom, and researchers will benefit from the critical attention paid to knowledge gaps in the field. It is a major resource for any reader committed to reducing the number of incidents just waiting to happen.

The much-anticipated revision of the second edition of The SAGES Manual: Fundamentals of Laparoscopy, Thoracoscopy, and GI Endoscopy, has been completely restructured, reorganized, and revised.

The Manual has been split into two volumes for better portability. Volume I, Basic Laparoscopy and Endoscopy covers the fundamentals and procedures performed during surgical residency. Volume I will be the first volume used by students, residents, and allied healthcare professional trainees. Material has been added to these fundamentals and procedures that will also be of interest to experienced surgeons.

Volume II, Advanced Laparoscopy and Endoscopy covers more advanced procedures, generally taught during fellowship.

All of the sections have been reorganized with a critical eye to the needs of the modern minimal access surgeon. Two new editors have been added. Chapters have been revised by both new authors as well as many stalwart authors from previous editions.

These portable handbooks cover all of the major laparoscopic and flexible endoscopic procedures in easy-to-read format. Indications, patient preparation, operative techniques, and strategies for avoiding and managing complications are included for the complete spectrum of both “gold standard” and emerging procedures in diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy, thoracoscopy, and endoscopy.

The scope, detail, and quality of the contributions confirm and demonstrate the SAGES commitment to surgical education. This manual is sure to find a home in the pocket, locker or briefcase of all gastrointestinal endoscopic surgeons and residents.

Operative Dictations in General and Vascular Surgery, the first volume in Springer's new Operative Dictations Made Simple Series, is intended to teach residents the principles of succinct and precise operative dictations for a wide spectrum of surgical procedures. Designed as a portable resource, the book provides typical dictations to guide the resident. Comprised of 155 procedures, this volume covers the alimentary tract, breast, lymph nodes, and head and neck, as well as vascular surgery, including aneurysmal disease and endovascular procedures. This volume provides templates for both minimally invasive and open approaches. As it is often difficult for the surgical resident to filter what should be included in the operative report, this book provides an authoritative guide for operative dictations while remaining flexible enough to accomodate variations in the surgical procedures performed. Written by the experienced team of a surgical department chair and a program director, the book guides the reader step-by-step through successful dictations. The book can also serve as a quick review of the essential steps of various surgical procedures. Clearly, a must-have for every surgical resident. In addition, Operative Dictations in General and Vascular Surgery: Operative Dictations Made Simple makes a perfect companion volume to Chassin's Operative Strategy in General Surgery, Third Edition, edited by Carol E. H. Scott-Conner, M.D., Ph.D. The procedures in both books are presented in the same order so the resident can easily use both resources together.
This is the first comprehensive study guide covering all aspects of pediatric critical care medicine. It fills a void that exists in learning resources currently available to pediatric critical care practitioners. The major textbooks are excellent references, but do not allow concise reading on specific topics and are not intended to act as both text and study guide. There are also several handbooks available, but these are usually written for general pediatric residents and lack the advanced physiology and pathophysiology required for the higher level pediatric critical care practitioner.

This study guide will bridge the gap between the current levels of books in press. It will be physiologically based covering major pediatric critical care principles and specific disease entities commonly encountered by the pediatric critical care practitioner. Pathophysiologic aspects unique to the pediatric patient will be emphasized. Chapters will contain ‘margin notes’ stressing important key points to the reader and study questions based on the chapter focus will conclude each chapter. The outline of each chapter will be dependent on the section of text as outlines below.

The condensed format of coverage is unique, involving heavily-illustrated text with self-assessment material to support learning objectives. The text is supported by case studies, tables and illustrations which describes the important theories and procedures on the pediatric critical care unit. This is useful for both pediatricians with patients either scheduled to enter the critical care unit or be discharged, pediatric critical care physicians and those in training and general critical care physicians who may see pediatric patients in their unit.

There are at least four reasons why a sleep clinician should be familiar with rating scales that evaluate different facets of sleep. First, the use of scales facilitates a quick and accurate assessment of a complex clinical problem. In three or four minutes (the time to review ten standard scales), a clinician can come to a broad understanding of the patient in question. For example, a selection of scales might indicate that an individual is sleepy but not fatigued; lacking alertness with no insomnia; presenting with no symptoms of narcolepsy or restless legs but showing clear features of apnea; exhibiting depression and a history of significant alcohol problems. This information can be used to direct the consultation to those issues perceived as most relevant, and can even provide a springboard for explaining the benefits of certain treatment approaches or the potential corollaries of allowing the status quo to continue.

Second, rating scales can provide a clinician with an enhanced vocabulary or language, improving his or her understanding of each patient. In the case of the sleep specialist, a scale can help him to distinguish fatigue from sleepiness in a patient, or elucidate the differences between sleepiness and alertness (which is not merely the inverse of the former). Sleep scales are developed by researchers and clinicians who have spent years in their field, carefully honing their preferred methods for assessing certain brain states or characteristic features of a condition. Thus, scales provide clinicians with a repertoire of questions, allowing them to draw upon the extensive experience of their colleagues when attempting to tease apart nuanced problems.

Third, some scales are helpful for tracking a patient’s progress. A particular patient may not remember how alert he felt on a series of different stimulant medications. Scale assessments administered periodically over the course of treatment provide an objective record of the intervention, allowing the clinician to examine and possibly reassess her approach to the patient.

Finally, for individuals conducting a double-blind crossover trial or a straightforward clinical practice audit, those who are interested in research will find that their own clinics become a source of great discovery. Scales provide standardized measures that allow colleagues across cities and countries to coordinate their practices. They enable the replication of previous studies and facilitate the organization and dissemination of new research in a way that is accessible and rapid. As the emphasis placed on evidence-based care grows, a clinician’s ability to assess his or her own practice and its relation to the wider medical community becomes invaluable. Scales make this kind of standardization possible, just as they enable the research efforts that help to formulate those standards.

The majority of Rating Scales in Sleep and Sleep Disorders:100 Scales for Clinical Practice is devoted to briefly discussing individual scales. When possible, an example of the scale is provided so that readers may gain a sense of the instrument’s content. Groundbreaking and the first of its kind to conceptualize and organize the essential scales used in sleep medicine, Rating Scales in Sleep and Sleep Disorders:100 Scales for Clinical Practice is an invaluable resource for all clinicians and researchers interested in sleep disorders.





















After diabetic retinopathy, the varieties of retinal vein occlusion (central, hemi-central, and branch) constitute the most prevalent category of retinal vascular disease. For macular edema associated with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), no effective therapy existed until 2009 despite decades of research and failed pilot therapies. In 2009, serial intravitreal triamcinolone therapy was proven to be effective compared to observation. In 2010, a randomized controlled trial reported that laser anastomosis was associated with improved vision relative to observation. For iris neovascularization associated with CRVO, laser panretinal photocoagulation has been proven to be effective at reducing neovascular glaucoma since 1995 and intraocular anti-VEGF drug injections for short term regression of iris neovascularization since 2005. For macular edema associated with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), grid laser photocoagulation was proven to have modest benefits compared to observation since 1988. Sector panretinal photocoagulation for retinal neovascularization associated with BRVO was proven to be effective in reducing vitreous hemorrhage in 1990.

Many proposed surgical therapies including radial optic neurotomy, retinal venous sheathotomy, and vitrectomy with panretinal laser photocoagulation have been piloted and abandoned in the last 20 years because of an excess of adverse side effects or lack of efficacy relative to a treatment benefit.

In the past 5 years, intravitreal injections of anti VEGF drugs have been developed and hold out the promise of improved outcomes compared to the older therapies. Concomitant with these treatment advances has been an improved but incomplete understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of retinal vein occlusions.

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.