Bram Stoker

Abraham "Bram" Stoker was an Irish novelist and short story writer best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel, Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.
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This meticulously edited collection contains complete works by writer Bram Stoker, the pioneer in vampire fiction and the author of the novel Dracula. The edition includes all other supernatural horrors and gothic novels, as well as occult and supernatural short stories. Contents: Novels: Dracula The Snake's Pass The Watter's Mou' The Mystery of the Sea The Jewel of Seven Stars The Man (The Gates of Life) The Lady of the Shroud The Lair of the White Worm (The Garden of Evil) The Primrose Path The Shoulder of Shasta Lady Athlyne Miss Betty Short Stories: Under the Sunset The Rose Prince The Invisible Giant The Shadow Builder How 7 Went Mad Lies and Lilies The Castle of the King The Wondrous Child Snowbound: The Record of a Theatrical Touring Party The Occasion A Lesson in Pets Coggins's Property The Slim Syrens A New Departure in Art Mick the Devil In Fear of Death At Last Chin Music A Deputy Waiter Work'us A Corner in Dwarfs A Criminal Star A Star Trap A Moon-Light Effect Dracula's Guest & Other Weird Stories Dracula's Guest The Judge's House The Squaw The Secret of the Growing Gold A Gipsy Prophecy The Coming of Abel Behenna The Burial of the Rats A Dream of Red Hands Crooken Sands Other Stories The Red Stockade The Dualists The Crystal Cup Buried Treasures The Chain of Destiny Our New House The Man from Shorrox' A Yellow Duster The 'Eroes of the Thames The Way of Peace Greater Love Lord Castleton Explains The Seer Midnight Tales Famous Imposters Bram Stoker (1847-1912) was an Irish author, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. Stoker spent several years researching European folklore and mythological stories of vampires. His Dracula became a part of popular culture and it established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy.
Includes the short story “Dracula’s Guest,” thought to be the omitted first chapter of Dracula.

Dracula is Bram Stoker’s classic gothic tale of Count Dracula, one of the most famous characters ever created in fiction, his relationship with Jonathan and Mina Harker, pursuit by Professor van Helsing and ultimate destruction in the name of love. Intent on immigrating to England, Count Dracula enlists the services of Jonathan Harker to arrange the purchase of a suitable residence. Intrigued by the young Harker and his beautiful wife, Mina, Dracula sets in motion a series of events that threatens the sanity of all.

Recognized today as a horror classic, at the time of its publication in 1897 Dracula touched on and challenged such contemporary themes as the role of women in Victorian England, sexual conventions, and colonialism. Using historical and regional folklore as a basis, Stoker defined the modern vampire, and his definition continues to influence current depictions of vampires across all forms of media.

Widely believed to be the deleted first chapter of Dracula, “Dracula’s Guest,” taken from Bram Stoker’s collection of short stories, follows an Englishman, presumed to be Jonathan Harker, on a visit to Munich en route to Transylvania. Despite warnings from his hotelier, the Englishman leaves the safety of his carriage and wanders towards an abandoned “unholy” village. “Dracula’s Guest” was originally published and introduced as the “excised chapter” in Dracula’s Guest and Other Weird Stories by Stoker’s widow, Florence.

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