James Evans

James R. Evans is Professor of Quantitative Analysis and Operations Management, and Director of the Total Quality Management Center in the College of Business Administration at the University of Cincinnati. He received BSIE and MSIE degrees from Purdue, and a Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Professor Evans has published over 70 refereed journal articles and many conference proceedings papers, and is author or co-author of over a dozen books in the areas of quality management and control, management science, operations management, creative thinking, and mathematics. He serves on several editorial boards of research journals and is a Fellow in and was 1997-98 President of the Decision Sciences Institute. He has also been active in the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science and the Institute of Industrial Engineers, having served as Cincinnati Chapter President and national Director of the Operations Research Division. Professor Evans has done applied operations research for several companies, was a finalist in the INFORMS Franz Edelman Competition, and schedules umpires for The American Baseball League. He has served as an Examiner and Senior Examiner for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award from 1994 through 1999; judge for the Ohio Manufacturer's Association Case Studies in Team Excellence Competition since 1996; and Chair of the Seasongood Innovation Awards for the City of Cincinnati in 1997-1998.
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The History and Practice of Ancient Astronomy combines new scholarship with hands-on science to bring readers into direct contact with the work of ancient astronomers. While tracing ideas from ancient Babylon to sixteenth-century Europe, the book places its greatest emphasis on the Greek period, when astronomers developed the geometric and philosophical ideas that have determined the subsequent character of Western astronomy. The author approaches this history through the concrete details of ancient astronomical practice. Carefully organized and generously illustrated, the book can teach readers how to do real astronomy using the methods of ancient astronomers. For example, readers will learn to predict the next retrograde motion of Jupiter using either the arithmetical methods of the Babylonians or the geometric methods of Ptolemy. They will learn how to use an astrolabe and how to design sundials using Greek and Roman techniques. The book also contains supplementary exercises and patterns for making some working astronomical instruments, including an astrolabe and an equatorium. More than a presentation of astronomical methods, the book provides a critical look at the evidence used to reconstruct ancient astronomy. It includes extensive excerpts from ancient texts, meticulous documentation, and lively discussions of the role of astronomy in the various cultures. Accessible to a wide audience, this book will appeal to anyone interested in how our understanding of our place in the universe has changed and developed, from ancient times through the Renaissance.
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