Nadia Bolz-Weber

Nadia Bolz-Weber is a New York Times bestselling author and the founding pastor of House for All Sinners and Saints, an ELCA mission church in Denver, Colorado. She's a leading voice in the emerging church movement and her writing can be found in The Christian Century and Jim Wallis' God's Politics blog. She is author of Salvation on the Small Screen?: 24 Hours of Christian Television (Seabury 2008) and the "Sarcastic Lutheran" blog on Patheos.
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Raw, intimate, and timely, Nadia Bolz-Weber’s latest book offers a full-blown overhaul of our harmful and antiquated ideas about sex, gender, and our bodies.
 
Christians are obsessed with sex. But not in a good way. For generations countless people have suffered pain, guilt, and judgment as a result of this toxic fixation on sex, the body, and physical pleasure. In the follow-up to her celebrated New York Times bestseller Accidental Saints, Bolz-Weber unleashes her critical eye, her sharp pen, and her vulnerable but hopeful soul on the caustic, fear-riddled, and religiously inspired messages about sex that have fed our shame.
            In turn, Bolz-Weber offers no simple amendments or polite compromises, because the stakes are too high—and our souls and our bodies are worth too much. Instead, this tattooed, swearing, modern-day pastor calls for a new reformation. She urges us to take antiquated, sexist ideas about sex, gender, and our bodies and “burn them the f*ck down and start all over.”
            This is a journey of holy resistance. Along the way, as antidotes to shame, heresy, and all-too-familiar injustice, Bolz-Weber dispenses grace, freedom, and courage. She shares stories, poetry, and scripture, cultivating resilient hope and audacious love rooted in good news that is “powerful enough, transgressive enough, and beautiful enough to heal not only the ones who have been hurt but also those who have done the hurting.”
            In Bolz-Weber’s most personal, bracingly honest book yet, she shares intimately about her life, with her trademark blend of vulnerability, humor, and candor. If you’ve been mistreated, confused, angered, and/or wounded by the shaming sexual messages so prevalent in religion, this one is for you.
Now a New York Times bestseller, Nadia Bolz-Weber takes no prisoners as she reclaims the term "pastrix"(pronounced "pas-triks," a term used by some Christians who refuse to recognize female pastors) in her messy, beautiful, prayer-and-profanity laden narrative about an unconventional life of faith.
Heavily tattooed and loud-mouthed, Nadia, a former stand-up comic, sure as hell didn't consider herself to be religious leader material-until the day she ended up leading a friend's funeral in a smoky downtown comedy club. Surrounded by fellow alcoholics, depressives, and cynics, she realized: These were her people. Maybe she was meant to be their pastor.

Using life stories-from living in a hopeful-but-haggard commune of slackers to surviving the wobbly chairs and war stories of a group for recovering alcoholics, from her unusual but undeniable spiritual calling to pastoring a notorious con artist-Nadia uses stunning narrative and poignant honesty to portray a woman who is both deeply faithful and deeply flawed, giving hope to the rest of us along the way.

Wildly entertaining and deeply resonant, this is the book for people who hunger for a bit of hope that doesn't come from vapid consumerism or navel-gazing; for women who talk too loud, and guys who love chick flicks; for the gay man who loves Jesus, and won't allow himself to be shunned by the church. In short, this book is for every thinking misfit suspicious of institutionalized religion, but who is still seeking transcendence and mystery.


From a seminarian and stand-up comic—an “enlightening and entertaining” look at celebrity televangelists, cash, and couch-potato redemption (AJ Jacobs, author of The Year of Living Biblically).
 
On an average day, the largest religious broadcast channel is a “divine” presence in more than 50 million households. Holding court on the political issues of the day are such figures as Joel Osteen, T.D. Jakes, Pat Robertson, Benny Hinn, and Jesse Duplantis. Yet many people have little concept of what kind of faith happens there—apart from performing miracles and selling books. A casual viewer flipping past the channel is likely to think, “I haven’t the faintest clue what’s going on,” or “That church doesn’t seem like my church at all,” or even, “Wow, so that’s what happened to Kirk Cameron.”
 
To better understand the message of religious television, Lutheran seminarian Nadia Bolz-Weber spent 24 hours immersing herself in the phenomenon with guest viewers including a rabbi, a Unitarian minister, and her eight-year-old daughter. Augmented by a running count of all of the biblical verses used and total cost of various donations solicited and products shilled through the day, the author chronicles this hugely influential part of America’s religious landscape that is unfamiliar to many. And she never changed channels once. The result is “laugh-out-loud, hysterically funny, and also extraordinarily poignant—we need more theology done like this.” (Dr. Douglas Gay, Lecturer in Practical Theology, University of Glasgow, Scotland).
 
“Turn off your TV and read this book. It's enlightening and entertaining and it doesn't emit any radiation whatsoever.” —AJ Jacobs, author of The Year of Living Biblically
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