Hard Candy (Deluxe Digital)

MadonnaApril 19, 2008
'00s Pop℗ 2008 Warner Records Inc.
370
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Hard Candy is the eleventh studio album by American singer and songwriter Madonna. It was released on April 19, 2008, by Warner Bros. Records. The album was her final studio album with the record company, marking the end of a 25-year recording history. Madonna started working on the album in early 2007, and collaborated with Justin Timberlake, Timbaland, The Neptunes and Nate "Danja" Hills. The album has an overall R&B vibe, while remaining a pop, dance-pop and hip hop record at its core. The Pet Shop Boys were also asked to collaborate with Madonna on the album by Warner Bros., but the record company later changed their mind and withdrew their invitation.
The singer became interested in collaborating with Timberlake after hearing his 2006 album FutureSex/LoveSounds. Together they developed a number of songs for the album, but the basis of the development was Pharrell Williams' demos. Madonna had a number of songs written down for the album, which amazed Timberlake. They had intensive discussions among themselves before recording a song. Later, Madonna recalled that most of the songs on Hard Candy were autobiographical in many respects.

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Songs
Popularity
1
Candy Shop4:15
2
4 Minutes (feat. Justin Timberlake and Timbaland)4:06
3
Give It 2 Me4:47
4
Heartbeat4:03
5
Miles Away4:48
6
She's Not Me6:04
7
Incredible6:19
8
Beat Goes On (feat. Kanye West)4:26
9
Dance 2night5:03
10
Spanish Lesson3:37
11
Devil Wouldn't Recognize You5:08
12
Voices3:39
13
4 Minutes (feat. Justin Timberlake and Timbaland) [Peter Saves New York Edit]5:00
14
4 Minutes (feat. Justin Timberlake and Timbaland) [Junkie XL Remix Edit]4:37
15
Give It 2 Me (Paul Oakenfold Edit)4:59
4.5
370 total
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Additional Information

Tracks
15
Released
April 29, 2008
Label
℗ 2008 Warner Records Inc.
File type
MP3
Access type
Streaming and by permanent download to your computer and/or device
Internet connection
Required for streaming and downloading
Playback information
Via Google Play Music app on Android v4+, iOS v7+, or by exporting MP3 files to your computer and playing on any MP3 compatible music player
By the time of 2004's Body Language, Kylie Minogue was seemingly unassailable, with three hit albums (both critically and commercially), a number of hit singles, and a recharged career that only a few years before had seemed precarious at best. She backed up the new material with a collection (Ultimate Kylie) that boasted excellent new material as well. All things seemed to be destined for further glory. And then, unfortunately, cancer hit. While she did recover fully from her illness and ordeal, there was some speculation on how she would deal with this event, and how her music and choice of collaborators would be affected. Many artists have come back from a potentially life-threatening disease with work that is a flat-out declaration of victory, songs and images that are thinly shrouded metaphors for rebirth or newfound strength. Therefore, it must have surprised many that the leadoff from Kylie's new record would be "2 Hearts," a '70s-style Roxy Music-esque glam jam that clocks in at under three minutes, and is -- seemingly -- devoid of any sort of "I'm back from the brink" anthemizing. Couple this pop gem with the gaudy early-'80s artwork, and the buzz was that Kylie was not only back, but back with a Me Decade swagger and ready to take back the momentum she'd been building since 2000. But to call X an '80s record is really only getting halfway there. Sure, the cover art is vintage 1982, and the majority of the record calls on production tricks and techniques that are of the same time, but much of the record calls on different eras -- not generalized decades as such, but eras in Kylie's own career. Most of the tracks could have fit in on earlier work, answering the question: what does a pop artist do when she's come full circle? She's been influenced as of late by '70s disco and '80s electro, but with X, it feels like Kylie has decided to take inspiration from Kylie herself.

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