Trey Day

Trey SongzOctober 1, 2007
Contemporary R&B℗ 2007 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.
313
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Trey Day is the second studio album by American R&B recording artist Trey Songz. It was released on October 1, 2007, by Atlantic Records. The album debuted at number 11 on the US Billboard 200, with 73,000 copies sold in the first week of release. It was a bit of the improvement than his previous album I Gotta Make It; which debuted at number 20 on the US Billboard 200. The album was supported by four singles: "Wonder Woman", "Can't Help but Wait", "Last Time", and "Missin' You".

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Songs
Popularity
1
Intro: Trey Day (feat. Bun B)1:08
2
Long Gone Missin'3:35
3
Wonder Woman5:16
4
No Clothes On3:34
5
Sex for Yo Stereo3:39
6
Last Time4:21
7
Can't Help but Wait3:26
8
Grub On3:42
9
Fly Together (feat. Jim Jones)4:26
10
Store Run4:38
11
Missin' You3:34
12
Role Play3:59
13
We Should Be5:55
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Additional Information

Tracks
13
Released
October 2, 2007
Label
℗ 2007 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.
File type
MP3
Access type
Streaming and by permanent download to your computer and/or device
Internet connection
Required for streaming and downloading
Playback information
Via Google Play Music app on Android v4+, iOS v7+, or by exporting MP3 files to your computer and playing on any MP3 compatible music player
The week "Run It!" was released, it went straight to the top of the Billboard Hot 100 and became the first single from a male artist to debut at that spot. That's no slight feat, especially for a reheated version of Usher's "Yeah!" made by a fresh-faced teenager who reps a little town in Virginia that rhymes with "grab a hammock." On "Run It!," Chris Brown is boosted by production from Scott Storch and an appearance by Juelz Santana. The song's way of tempering Brown's small-town innocence with hard-edged backing and a guest spot from an MC of ill repute is clearly a strategy to make the singer appeal to more than tween girls. (Had Brown been coming up in the early '90s, Quincy Jones -- not Dr. Dre -- might've produced him and Prince -- not Luther Campbell -- might've assisted, which just goes to show how much R&B has changed in 15 years.) Chris Brown, a durable debut album, almost always involves an even push-and-pull between what appeals to kids who don't consider street credibility, and those who do, all the way down to the visuals: check the album cover, featuring the singer's strained "Don't mess with me!" face, and compare it to the photo spread inside, featuring Brown's natural "Pinch my cheeks!" face. He doesn't often try to sound harder or more demonstrative than necessary, unlike a lot of singers his age who have sprouted during the late '90s and early 2000s, and he rarely oversteps the kind of romantic territory that most teens find relatable. Toughness comes instead from the beats, whether they're provided by the Underdogs, Dre & Vidal, Cool & Dre, or the overworked Storch. While Brown's audience will be almost exclusively 18 and under, few of his fans will feel sheepish in owning this album. He's a refreshing presence, a high-schooler who's neither as family friendly as Will Smith nor as comically vulgar as Pretty Ricky. [The 2005 DualDisc edition comes packaged with an additional DVD of bonus material.]
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