Undun

Edited
The RootsJanuary 1, 2011
Hip-Hop/Rap℗ 2011 The Island Def Jam Music Group
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Undun is the tenth studio album by American hip hop band The Roots, released on December 2, 2011, by Def Jam Recordings. Recording sessions for the album took place at several recording locations in Philadelphia and New York City. Production was handled primarily by Questlove, record producer and drummer for the band.
Undun incorporates neo soul and indie music elements. It is an existential concept album about the short, tragic life of fictional character Redford Stevens, set in urban poverty, and is told through a reverse-chronological narrative.
The album performed modestly on music charts and sold 112,000 copies in the United States. Undun received widespread acclaim from critics, who praised its existential subject matter, production quality, and the band's musicianship. It was included on several critics' year-end lists of best albums.

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Songs
Artist
1
Dun1:16The Roots
2
Sleep (feat. Son Little)2:15The Roots
3
Make My (feat. Big K.R.I.T. & Dice Raw)4:27The Roots
4
One Time (feat. Phonte & Dice Raw)3:55The Roots
5
Kool On (feat. Greg Porn & Truck North)3:48The Roots
6
The OtherSide (feat. Bilal Oliver & Greg Porn)4:03The Roots
7
Stomp (feat. Greg Porn)2:23The Roots
8
Lighthouse (feat. Dice Raw)3:43The Roots
9
I Remember3:14The Roots
10
Tip The Scale (feat. Dice Raw)4:17The Roots
11
Redford (For Yia-Yia & Pappou)1:51Sufjan Stevens
12
Possibility (2nd Movement)0:55The Roots
13
Will To Power (3rd Movement)1:03The Roots
14
Finality (4th Movement)1:31The Roots
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Additional Information

Total length
38:50
Tracks
14
Released
January 1, 2011
Label
℗ 2011 The Island Def Jam Music Group
File type
MP3
Access type
Streaming and by permanent download to your computer and/or device
Internet connection
Required for streaming and downloading
Playback information
Via Google Play Music app on Android v4+, iOS v7+, or by exporting MP3 files to your computer and playing on any MP3 compatible music player
Game Theory is the Roots' equivalent of a Funkadelic playlist containing "Wars of Armageddon," "Cosmic Slop," "Maggot Brain," "March to the Witch's Castle," and "America Eats Its Young." It's a vivid reflector of the times, not an escape hatch (of which there are several readily available options). Spinning turbulence, paranoia, anger, and pain into some of the most exhilarating and startling music released in 2006, the group is audibly galvanized by the world's neverending tailspin and a sympathetic alignment with Def Jam. Batting around stray ideas and squeezing them into shape was clearly not part of the plan, and neither was getting on the radio. The songs flow into and out of one another to optimal effect, with an impossibly stern sense of peak-of-powers focus, as if the group and its collaborators instantly locked into place and simply knocked the thing out. With the exception of the elbow-throwing "Here I Come," nothing here is suitable for any kind of carefree activity. The extent of the album's caustic nature is tipped off early on, after glancing at the hangman on the cover and hearing Wadud Ahmad's penetrating voice run through lines like "Pilgrims, slaves, Indians, Mexicans/It looks real f*cked up for your next of kin." The point at which the album kicks into full gear, just a couple minutes later, arrives when tumbling bass drums and a Sly & the Family Stone sample ("This is a game/I'm your specimen") are suddenly overtaken by pure panic -- pulse-racing drums, anxious organ jabs, pent-up guitar snarls, and breathless rhyming from Black Thought and Malik B. "In the Music" exemplifies the deeply textured nature of the album's production work, with its rolling/roiling rhythm -- throbbing bass, clanging percussion, tight spirals of guitar -- made all the more claustrophobic by Porn's amorphous chorus and Black Thought's and Malik B.'s hunched-shoulder deliveries. Even "Baby," the closest thing to a breather in this patch of the album, arises from a sweltering jungle bog. After "Long Time," the ninth track, the levels of tension and volume decrease, yet the moods are no brighter, even if the surfaces leave a different impression. "Clock with No Hands" is introduced as a sweet slow jam with a light vocal hook from Mercedes Martinez, but it's as paranoid as anything else on the album. Jack Davey projects the chorus of the slower, Radiohead-sampling "Atonement" in a druggy haze while Black Thought speaks of "being faced with the weight of survival." The closer, an eight-minute suite titled "Can't Stop This," features a J Dilla production -- previewed on his Donuts, released the week he left this planet -- that opens and closes with testimonials to the musician's talent and humanity. Taken with or without this staggering finale, Game Theory is a "heavy" album, the Roots' sharpest work. It's destined to become one of Def Jam's proudest, if not most popular, moments. [The Japanese version of the album contains bonus tracks.]
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