1992: The Love Album (Deluxe Version)

Explicit
Alternative/Indie℗ 2012 Chrysalis Records Limited
4
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1992 – The Love Album is an album by Carter the Unstoppable Sex Machine. Released on Chrysalis Records, following the demise of Rough Trade Records, the album achieved commercial success and became the band's first and only number 1 album in the UK album charts. It also contained their only Top 10 hit, "The Only Living Boy in New Cross", which reached #7 in the UK charts. The album also included two further hit singles, "Do Re Me So Far So Good" and "The Impossible Dream". Initially, an earlier single, "After The Watershed" was also programmed to be included in the album track listing, but due to an injunction from the publishers of The Rolling Stones, resulting in the band having to credit the composition to Morrison / Carter / Richards / Jagger, it was omitted from the album as they otherwise would have had to forego publishing royalties for every copy of the album sold.
A deluxe edition was released in 2012, featuring all of the b-sides, the "After the Watershed" single reinserted into the original running order, a song from NME's Ruby Trax compilation and live recordings from a performance at the Féile Festival, 31 July 1992.

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Disc 1

Songs
1
1993 (2012 Remaster)3:14
2
Is Wrestling Fixed (2012 Remaster)2:03
3
The Only Living Boy in New Cross (2012 Remaster)3:57
4
Suppose You Gave a Funeral and Nobody Came (2012 Remaster)4:08
5
England (2012 Remaster)2:35
6
Do Re Me so Far so Good (2012 Remaster)3:04
7
After the Watershed (2012 Remaster)4:18
8
Look Mum, No Hands (2012 Remaster)2:58
9
While You Were Out (2012 Remaster)4:02
10
Skywest and Crooked (2012 Remaster)4:49
11
The Impossible Dream (2012 Remaster)5:08

Disc 2

Songs
1
The 90s Revival (2012 Remaster)2:03
2
A Nation of Shoplifters (2012 Remaster)2:04
3
This Is How It Feels (2012 Remaster)3:03
4
Panic (2012 Remaster)3:02
5
Watching the Big Apple Turn Over (2012 Remaster)3:30
6
King Rocker (2012 Remaster)2:26
7
Mannequin (2012 Remaster)3:44
8
Down in the Tube Station at Midnight (2012 Remaster)3:59
9
Turn On, Tune in and Switch Off (2012 Remaster)2:27
10
When Thesauruses Ruled the Earth (2012 Remaster)3:20
11
Bring on the Girls (2012 Remaster)2:54
12
Another Brick in the Wall (2012 Remaster)4:01
13
Look Mum, No Hands (Live at the Feile Festival, 31 July 1992)3:03
14
Anytime Anyplace Anywhere (Live at the Feile Festival, 31 July 1992)4:11
15
Sheriff Fatman (Live at the Feile Festival, 31 July 1992)4:57
16
A Prince in a Pauper's Grave (Live at the Feile Festival, 31 July 1992)4:20
17
While You Were Out (Live at the Feile Festival, 31 July 1992)4:04
18
Shopper's Paradise (Live at the Feile Festival, 31 July 1992)4:50
19
After the Watershed (Live at the Feile Festival, 31 July 1992)4:00
20
Bloodsport for All (Live at the Feile Festival, 31 July 1992)5:13
21
A Perfect Day to Drop the Bomb (Live at the Feile Festival, 31 July 1992)5:57
4.8
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Additional Information

Total length
1:57:23
Tracks
32
Released
May 16, 1992
Label
℗ 2012 Chrysalis Records Limited
File type
MP3
Access type
Streaming and by permanent download to your computer and/or device
Internet connection
Required for streaming and downloading
Playback information
Via Google Play Music app on Android v4+, iOS v7+, or by exporting MP3 files to your computer and playing on any MP3 compatible music player
With an unchanged lineup and for part of the time the same producer, Pat Collier, Kingmaker took things to a more impressive level on Sleepwalking, the brash and well-intentioned Eat Yourself Whole days giving way, just a little, to a more impressive, edgier effort. It's a matter of degrees, admittedly -- Hardy is still addicted to some fairly abysmal rhymes at points, while his voice remains unchanged outside of a rougher bark here and there, which doesn't always serve him well. However, the music as a whole gels a bit better this time and, while Hardy found his thunder completely stolen soon after by Oasis, whose Jam/Smiths worship was transformed into something truly spectacular, on balance Sleepwalking is a much more enjoyable listen in the end than Kingmaker's debut. The Howell/Andrew rhythm team comes a little more into its own, Andrew in particular building on the occasional flash and flair he demonstrated in earlier recordings, while Hardy's guitar work is much more direct and slashing, even at the band's jauntier moments. Meanwhile, some of the guest performers do their best to make Sleepwalking a downright lush experience at points -- James Taylor (the English keyboardist, not the American easy listening guy) adds keyboards on a number of songs, while Anne Dudley adds a low-key string arrangement to "Tomorrow's World." Even the obvious genre exercises -- the ska-tinged "Queen Jane," the overt Spector drama of "Help Yourself," the glammed-up strut "Ten Years Asleep" -- are good fun. Still, though, somebody needed to tell Hardy to drop the obvious pop culture references used as metaphor -- "With his macho pressgang crowd/Belsen would be his EuroDisney" is pure pain, and merely one poor example of many.
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