Roberta Gambarini

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Top SongsAlbum
1
Deep PurpleYou Are There5:15
2
How Are Things In Glocca MorraYou Are There4:00
3
When Lights Are LowYou Are There4:57
4
You're Getting To Be A Habit With MeYou Are There3:17
5
Cool Breeze (Live at Umbria 2006)You Are There - EP3:35
6
Just Squeeze MeYou Are There6:18
7
SuppertimeYou Are There3:08
8
Then I'll Be Tired Of YouYou Are There5:06
9
Body And Soul (Live at Umbria 2006)You Are There - EP3:02
10
You Are ThereYou Are There2:48
It seems incredible that Roberta Gambarini didn't win the Thelonious Monk Jazz Vocal Competition but she was new to the U.S., having just arrived from her native Italy. But with each new release, she has demonstrated that she is easily the most accomplished vocalist of the competitors for the prize, while pianist Hank Jones, who knows a thing or two about great singers, refers to her as the "greatest vocalist to come along in the past 60 years." With a rhythm section rotating between three talented up-and-coming pianists Tamir Hendeman, Eric Gunnison, or Gerald Clayton) plus veteran bassists George Mraz, Neil Swainson, or Chuck Berghofer and seasoned drummers Jake Hanna, Al Foster, Jeff Hamilton, or Montez Coleman, Gambarini works her magic with familiar standards and a few unexpected choices. She has a love of Cole Porter's songs, opening with a touching, richly textured "So in Love," a virtual rhapsody in a duet with piano. She restores the oft-omitted verse to "Get Out of Town" then delivers a driving rendition that shows off her gift for interpreting a song that has likely been recorded by all vocal jazz greats who have preceded her, proving she belongs in their company; she is joined by the soft tenor sax of James Moody. Her rapid-fire scatting is a highlight of her brisk treatment of "From This Moment On." Gambarini is also very comfortable looking outside of jazz for material, adapting Willie Nelson's "Crazy" with a master's touch, with subtle trumpet added by Roy Hargrove, while she has equal success with a medley of Beatles songs, including a moving "Golden Slumbers" that segues into a breezy "Here, There and Everywhere." But Gambarini's hilarious lyrics for Johnny Griffin's blues "The JAMFs Are Coming" (retitled "You Ain't Nothin' But a J.A.M.F.") prove to be the big surprise, showing off her incredible scatting range and sense of humor, though like a true lady, she never specifies what Griffin meant by a JAMF (hint: an acronym starting with "Jive Ass"). Roberta Gambarini continues to shine brightly as one of top jazz vocalists of her generation with this outstanding release.
Roberta Gambarini is a breath of fresh air among female jazz vocalists. Gifted with superb clear diction, a warm engaging voice, and an uncanny ability to bring out the best in each song, Gambarini shines throughout this one-afternoon session, recorded without isolation booths, splicing, or overdubs. Her sole accompanist is the masterful pianist Hank Jones, a veteran who knows something about inspiring great vocalists with his inventive piano playing, having recorded with Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Anita O'Day, and Helen Merrill during a career that began over six decades prior to this session. The duo chose a wide-ranging mix of standards, show tunes, and jazz compositions (both familiar and lesser-known), along with some forgotten chestnuts of yesteryear. It is not surprising to learn that Gambarini and Jones entered the studio without a rehearsal or any arrangements, yet completed most of the 14 songs in a single take. "Stardust" is one of the most recorded works of all time, yet Gambarini recognizes the nuances within it and takes her time exploring each chorus, while Jones' elegant backing and delicious solo are flawless. Billy Strayhorn's "Lush Life" is one of the most demanding jazz compositions, a melancholy ballad with an unusual structure that trips up many vocalists, but Gambarini takes her time with a deliberate interpretation that ranks with any previous vocal recording of it. Their magical rendition of the sentimental ballad "You Are There" (music by Johnny Mandel, lyrics by Dave Frishberg) seems like it would be a natural choice for a film soundtrack. "Deep Purple" may have fallen out of favor in modern jazz, but Gambarini and Jones reveal its timeless quality with a sparkling performance. She's in a playful mood in "You're Getting to Be a Habit with Me." This exceptional vocal/piano duo recording is clearly one for the ages.
Roberta Gambarini is a breath of fresh air among female jazz vocalists. Gifted with superb clear diction, a warm engaging voice, and an uncanny ability to bring out the best in each song, Gambarini shines throughout this one-afternoon session, recorded without isolation booths, splicing, or overdubs. Her sole accompanist is the masterful pianist Hank Jones, a veteran who knows something about inspiring great vocalists with his inventive piano playing, having recorded with Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Anita O'Day, and Helen Merrill during a career that began over six decades prior to this session. The duo chose a wide-ranging mix of standards, show tunes, and jazz compositions (both familiar and lesser-known), along with some forgotten chestnuts of yesteryear. It is not surprising to learn that Gambarini and Jones entered the studio without a rehearsal or any arrangements, yet completed most of the 14 songs in a single take. "Stardust" is one of the most recorded works of all time, yet Gambarini recognizes the nuances within it and takes her time exploring each chorus, while Jones' elegant backing and delicious solo are flawless. Billy Strayhorn's "Lush Life" is one of the most demanding jazz compositions, a melancholy ballad with an unusual structure that trips up many vocalists, but Gambarini takes her time with a deliberate interpretation that ranks with any previous vocal recording of it. Their magical rendition of the sentimental ballad "You Are There" (music by Johnny Mandel, lyrics by Dave Frishberg) seems like it would be a natural choice for a film soundtrack. "Deep Purple" may have fallen out of favor in modern jazz, but Gambarini and Jones reveal its timeless quality with a sparkling performance. She's in a playful mood in "You're Getting to Be a Habit with Me." This exceptional vocal/piano duo recording is clearly one for the ages.
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