New Releases

RECHARGED

LINKIN PARK

The Paradigm Shift

Korn

Therapy (Sessions With Ross Robinson)

Tech N9ne

The Wrong Side Of Heaven And The Righteous Side Of Hell (Volume 2)

Five Finger Death Punch
The Wrong Side of Heaven and the Righteous Side of Hell, Volume 2 is the fifth studio album by American heavy metal band Five Finger Death Punch and the second of two albums released by the band in 2013, with Volume 1 having been released on July 30. It was released on November 19, 2013. Preorders for the album went up on iTunes on August 10, 2013.

~ Provided by Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wrong_Side_of_Heaven_and_the_Righteous_Side_of_Hell,_Volume_2) under Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/legalcode)

Hydra

Within Temptation

Hesitation Marks

Nine Inch Nails

Going To Hell

The Pretty Reckless

Blood At The Orpheum

In This Moment

La Gárgola

Chevelle

The Afterman (Deluxe Set)

Coheed and Cambria

Broken Crown Halo

Lacuna Coil

In It to Win It

Saliva

All Re-Mixed Up

Puscifer

Puppet Strings

Fuel

From Beer To Eternity

Ministry

Time Travelers & Bonfires

Sevendust

Savages

Soulfly

Masks

Eyes Set To Kill

Volition

Protest The Hero

Extremist

Demon Hunter

Tres Cabrones

Melvins

Shine

Anette Olzon

Top Albums

La Gárgola

Chevelle

Going To Hell

The Pretty Reckless

Come Clean

Puddle Of Mudd
Puddle of Mudd's story is every struggling musician's dream come true: armed with a fake backstage pass, frontman Wes Scantlin snuck the band's demo to a Limp Bizkit security guy at a show in their native Kansas City, and less than one year later finds his group's debut album the first release on Fred Durst's new label. Thankfully, Come Clean sounds nothing like Limp Bizkit; Puddle of Mudd's aggro-rock sound is similar to every other Alice in Chains- and Tool-influenced band to come along in the past few years. The opening, "Control," milks the loud/quiet formula that Nirvana brought back to life, but adds some interesting stop-time changes during the break, while the acoustic balladry of "Drift & Die" will sound familiar, sounding like something Layne Staley could have written.

Bret Love, Rovi

The Wrong Side Of Heaven And The Righteous Side Of Hell (Volume 2)

Five Finger Death Punch
The Wrong Side of Heaven and the Righteous Side of Hell, Volume 2 is the fifth studio album by American heavy metal band Five Finger Death Punch and the second of two albums released by the band in 2013, with Volume 1 having been released on July 30. It was released on November 19, 2013. Preorders for the album went up on iTunes on August 10, 2013.

~ Provided by Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wrong_Side_of_Heaven_and_the_Righteous_Side_of_Hell,_Volume_2) under Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/legalcode)

Extremist

Demon Hunter

Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies

Volbeat
In the two-and-half years since Volbeat's wildly successful Beyond Hell/Above Heaven, they've traveled some miles, both literally and figuratively. They toured not only Europe but the U.S. and Canada in support for nearly a year, and parted ways with lead guitarist Thomas Bredahl. A permanent replacement was found in Robert Caggiano, formerly of Anthrax, who was enlisted to produce Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies and play on select tracks. His addition has proved integral to the band's ever evolving sound. While the meld of various kinds of heavy metal, country, and rockabilly is still present here -- it is now undoubtedly the sound of Volbeat itself -- the lines between those styles are less pronounced. The sometimes jarring shift from rockabilly to thrash, from death metal to the Johnny Cash-country on previous albums, still happens, but here these sounds often coexist within the same song. While it is accurate to say that this set is more accessible than anything Volbeat has attempted previously, it is also the most ambitious set of tracks they've committed to tape. The songwriting is tight, focused; there are lots of hooks, most of them heavy -- thanks, no doubt, to Caggiano's presence. His playing style is full of insanely catchy riffs, vamps, and intricate melodies. Michael Tomas Poulsen's vocals still blend Elvis, James Hetfield, and Keith Caputo, but they growl less; they're expressive and natural sounding. Hard rock and vintage HM are the prevalent sounds here -- as heard on cuts like "Pearl Heart," the riff-arific "The Nameless One," and the aggressive attack in "The Hangman's Body Count." The slow, doomy chug of "Room 24" melds early Black Sabbath to death metal with King Diamond guesting on vocals. Another surprise is in the cover of Young the Giant's "My Body." Thanks to Poulsen's awesome singing and the blasting guitars, it could pass as a Volbeat anthem. An excellent example of all the band's styles converging at once is in "Black Bart," with death metal, Gun Club-style punk-country, and even Thin Lizzy's twin lead guitars. Former Dubstar and Client vocalist Sarah Blackwood sings with Poulsen on "Lonesome Rider," where slap bass rockabilly and hooky '80s metal commingle. Thin Lizzy also get channeled on the killer "The Sinner Is You," while Civil War-era banjo introduces the theatrical country meets death metal choogler "Doc Holliday." A high lonesome desert harmonica à la Ennio Morricone introduces closer "Our Loved Ones," which is as fine a melodic headbanger as anything the band's ever cut. While it is accurate to say that Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies is more accessible than anything Volbeat has attempted previously, it is also the most ambitious -- and arguably enjoyable -- set they've committed to tape.

Toxicity

System Of A Down
System of a Down's 1998 debut was initially overlooked by the mainstream hard rock audience, as well as the specialized press. But heavy metal cognoscenti in both camps quickly realized that in their hands was a potentially crucial stepping stone for the future development of heavy metal. Sure enough, so challenging and groundbreaking were its contents that the album soared over most everyone's unsuspecting heads, its eventual gold sales status only achieved via Columbia Records' massive promotional muscle and nearly three years of intensive touring on the band's part. Consequently, early believers were pleasantly surprised when 2001's long awaited follow-up, Toxicity met with instant popular acceptance, skyrocketing up the charts toward multi-platinum success. Yet, for the most part, it also managed to retained SOAD's unorthodox signature sound: so-called "nu-metal" uniquely infused with remarkable originality, including angular riffs, jagged rhythms, and oblique lyrics splattered all over the place. Like its predecessor, Toxicity seems utterly chaotic upon first listen, but things quickly begin falling into place, thanks to a number of small refinements, not least of which is a more generous melody, obviously pre-meditated, but rarely overdone. In turn, this immediacy greatly improved the album's chances at radio -- case in point, first single "Chop Suey!," a track so potent not even September 11, nor mainstream radio's ensuing self-imposed, politically correct attempt at self-censorship, could tear from the airwaves (despite its none-too-discreet lyrics about suicide), the song's surprising success was reminiscent of another left-field hit from a decade earlier, Faith No More's "Epic" (hear its piano-led outro for proof). And sure enough, from the unexpected false starts of "Prison Song" to the relatively mellow conclusion, the band's heightened commercial sensibility continues to joust with their inherently quirky songwriting. The excellent title track, "Forest," and "Science" are among the most accessible standouts from an incredibly diverse set, the likes of which SOAD's inferior nu-metal peers could only hope to emulate. Lyrically, it's simply no contest. Whether tackling typical rock subject matter like drug abuse ("Needles") and groupies ("Psycho"), or embarking on inscrutable Dadaist gems like "Jet Pilot" and "Shimmy," co-songwriters Daron Malakian and Serj Tankain sound like are the bastard children of Frank Zappa and Slayer. And while sub-Rage Against the Machine political invective (unfairly attributed to their Armenian heritage) remains an integral part of the band's creative makeup (e.g. "Deer Dance," "Atwa"), Toxicity's approach is much more cautious in this regard than that of their incendiary debut. In conclusion, when a band takes this many left turns, you'd expect them to start going in circles sooner rather than later, but this is not the case with System of a Down. Hands down one of 2001's top metal releases, Toxicity may well prove to be a lasting heavy metal classic to boot.

Eduardo Rivadavia, Rovi

The Joy of Motion

Animals As Leaders

Fallen

Evanescence
Fallen is the major-label debut of Evanescence, a Little Rock, AR-based quartet led by the soaring vocals of 20-year-old Amy Lee. Emboldened by the inclusion of its single "Bring Me to Life" on the soundtrack to the hit film Daredevil, Fallen debuted at an impressive number seven on Billboard's Top 40. But "Bring Me to Life" is a bit misleading. A flawless slice of Linkin Park-style anguish pop, it's actually a duet between Lee and 12 Stones' Paul McCoy. In fact, almost half of Fallen's 11 songs are piano-driven ballads that suggest Tori Amos if she wore too much mascara and recorded for the Projekt label. The other half of the album does include flashes of the single's PG-rated nu-metal ("Everybody's Fool," "Going Under"). But it's the symphonic goth rock of groups like Type O Negative that influences most of Fallen. Ethereal synths float above Ben Moody's crunching guitar in "Haunted," while "Whisper" even features apocalyptic strings and a scary chorus of Latin voices right out of Carmina Burana. "Tourniquet" is an anguished, urgent rocker driven by chugging guitars and spiraling synths, with brooding lyrics that reference Evanescence's Christian values: "Am I too lost to be saved?/Am I too lost?/My God! My tourniquet/Return to me salvation." The song is Fallen's emotional center point and defines the band's sound.

Hybrid Theory

Linkin Park
Linkin Park originally called itself Hybrid Theory and has retained that phrase for the title of its debut album. The "hybrid" in question is one of rap and metal. The guitars and drums lock into standard thrash patterns, over which singer Chester Bennington and rapper Mike Shinoda alternate in furious expressions of rage and frustration. "One Step Closer," the track released to radio in advance of the album's release, is a typical effort, with lyrics like "Everything you say to me/Takes me one step closer to the edge/And I'm about to break."

William Ruhlmann, Rovi

Blood

In This Moment
On their fourth studio album, female-fronted, cathartic metalcore outfit In This Moment expand their artistic environment. Working with producer Kevin Churko (Ozzy Osbourne, Five Finger Death Punch), the band tap into orchestral layers ("Rise With Me") and industrialized, electronic tinges ("Blood"), while still balancing their archetypal heaviness ("Whore"). As frontwoman Maria Brink’s intensity soars from agonized screams to quiet, hushed singing throughout, her shining moment doesn’t come until album closer "11:11."

Jen Guyre, Google Play

One-X

Three Days Grace
Three Days Grace continue their accessible alt-metal attack of blunt lyrics and crunching rhythms with their sophomore effort, One-X. Thematically based around dealing with the disconnect felt while Three Days Grace were on the road in support of their 2003 album, the music remains catchy despite its lyrical darkness. Not surprisingly, the songs mostly revolve around feelings of isolation, tumultuous relationships, and anguished loneliness -- but through all their misery and confusion, Three Days Grace ultimately embrace the difficulties as merely a part of being human ("I'd rather feel pain than nothing at all" from "Pain"). The band's simple and direct approach owns a certain charm that makes One-X an enjoyable listen, albeit hardly innovative. The bandmembers still have no desire to mask sentiments behind perverse metaphors; just as their 2003 smash single "I Hate Everything About You" addressed a problematic relationship in powerfully straight terms, so do tracks on One-X. For instance -- and just so there's no room for confusion -- "Let It Die" frankly states "I swear I never meant to let it die/I just don't care about you anymore." And the forthright "Riot" ("Let's start a riot!") is one of a few riled-up outsider anthems on hand. But, there are also a number of tracks present that find Three Days Grace adding a few interesting twists to their hard-hitting formula that not only show a gentler side to the guys, but also work out rather nicely. Calming things down a bit, fluid instrumentation and vocalist Adam Gontier's steady delivery make the ominous "Get Out Alive" one of their strongest (though softer) songs, while "Over and Over" employs impassioned strings for an exploration of, yes, dysfunctional relationships. "Pain" finds the band channeling its inner Soundgarden and "Animal I Have Become" has a slight singsongy chorus to complement the track's thick riffing. There is no reason that fans of the band shouldn't embrace this album as the satisfying listen that it is. Some further distinctive qualities could be useful in helping separate Three Days Grace more from their alt-metal peers, but One-X certainly plays as a proficient step in the right direction.

Corey Apar, Rovi

Broken Crown Halo

Lacuna Coil

Nightmare

Avenged Sevenfold
Avenged Sevenfold’s fifth full-length outing is dedicated to the band’s drummer James Sullivan (the Reverend Tholomew Plague), who passed away at the age of 28 on December 28, 2009. Sullivan’s favorite drummer, Dream Theater’s Mike Portnoy, was asked to take his place behind the kit, and the resulting Nightmare, which features 11 new songs, dutifully pays tribute to the past while setting the pace for the future. James Christopher Monger, Rovi

Beyond Hell / Above Heaven

Volbeat
A first listen to Danish "metal rockers" Volbeat's Beyond Hell/Above Heaven, reveals how completely they've consolidated all the elements they've experimented with since 2007's Rock the Rebel/Metal the Devil: punk, roots rock & roll, rockabilly, heavy metal, death metal, country, and '70s hard rock. Power chords, hooky melodies, chanted choruses, lyric themes obsessed with the no-man's land that exists between -- and beyond -- good and evil, and the sense of hard partying recklessness simultaneously reflect influences as wide as Social Distortion, the Misfits, AC/DC, and Metallica, Judas Priest, and Exodus. Once more recorded and engineered by Jacob Hansen, Beyond Hell/Above Heaven extends the narrative that began on Guitar Gangsters & Cadillac Blood with two more chapters in the saga via the tracks "7 Shots," and opener "The Mirror and the Ripper." The former is a perfect aural illustration of Volbeat's ability to integrate seemingly disparate elements by including banjos (courtesy of Rod Sinclair), bluesman Anders Pederson's slide guitar work, and the heavy metal axe chugging of Kreator's Mille Petrozza and Mercyful Fate-King Diamond six-string pyrotechnician Michael Denner. "Heaven and Hell" is pure AC/DC power riffage sent dimensionally askew by Henrik Hall's killer bluesy harmonica work that transforms the tune melodically into something that balances the Phil Spector-esque side of Glenn Danzig's melodic sensibilities (on the earliest Misfits singles) and late-'70s metal. This cut is followed immediately by the harder, darker, death metal of "Who They Are" that nonetheless carries within it an irresistible, nearly anthemic chorus. Likewise "A Warrior's Call," with its furious doom-and-gloom intro that gives way to a big, bad, strutting rock & roll stomper. "Fallen" recalls the Foo Fighters' "Everlong" in approach, yet is heavier still. The thrash end happens on "Evelyn," with guest vocals by Napalm Death's Mark "Barney" Greenway on the verses before Michael Poulsen adds his trademark lyricism in the chorus. (And this is to say little of the skittering punk-country of "Being 1," an irrepressible love song with teeth.) Any way you slice it, Volbeat, a skillful repository of so many lineage sounds, are their own thing: a band apart who are sophisticated, accessible, and utterly entertaining as songwriters and performers. Nowhere is this more true than on Beyond Hell/Above Heaven. [The album was also released with a bonus track, "Still Counting."]

Thom Jurek, Rovi

Swan Songs (Explicit Version)

Hollywood Undead

Onyx

Pop Evil
Released in 2011, War of Angels found hard-hitting, Western Michigan-based rockers Pop Evil delivering a solid slab of AOR rock UFC anthems that explored the notion of reinvention. Pop Evil continue to mine the rap/alt-rock/post-grunge sonic blast of the late '90s/early 2000s with dizzying results on their third album, Onyx, which was produced by Johnny K (Drowning Pool, Staind, Disturbed, Megadeth). The band offers up ten relentless new songs, including the blistering single "Trenches," that manage to introduce darker themes and clever stylistic shifts into the mix while maintaining the gritty yet accessible Midwestern backbone that won Pop Evil favor with the hard rock community in the first place., Rovi

The Best Of Nickelback (Volume 1)

Nickelback

The Paradigm Shift

Korn

Rage Against The Machine

Rage Against The Machine
Seething with revolutionary spirit, the self-titled debut of Rage Against the Machine record had social, cultural and musical rebellion at its very core. In the group's marriage of heavy metal guitars and hip-hop rebellion, tunes like "Killing in the Name," "Take the Power Back" and "Know Your Enemy" were a singular crystallization of underground movements that were waiting to burst through to a mainstream audience, and the band's uncompromising message was every bit as astonishing as their commercial success. Years after its release, guitarist Tom Morello's brilliant, jagged shredding and the eloquent fury of vocalist Zack de la Rocha are just as incendiary as ever.

Nate Cavalieri, Google Play

Time Travelers & Bonfires

Sevendust

Top Songs

Heaven Knows

The Pretty Reckless

House Of The Rising Sun

Five Finger Death Punch

Bring Me To Life

Evanescence

Torn to Pieces

Pop Evil

Bad Company

Five Finger Death Punch

Down With The Sickness

Disturbed

My Immortal

Evanescence

Numb

Linkin Park

Lola Montez

Volbeat

What If I Was Nothing

All That Remains

Crazy Bitch

Buckcherry

Burn It Down

Linkin Park

Whore

In This Moment

Take Out the Gunman

Chevelle

Here Without You

3 Doors Down

Second Chance

Shinedown

Bad Girlfriend [Explicit]

Theory Of A Deadman

Bodies

Drowning Pool

Last Resort

Papa Roach

Simple Man [Rock Version]

Shinedown

I Hate Everything About You

Three Days Grace

Weak

Seether

Blurry

Puddle Of Mudd