New Releases

Neon (Edited Version)

Jay Sean

Andrew Ashong EP

Andrew Ashong

Limey

Rainy Milo

The Anthology 1992-2003

The Poets Of Rhythm

Suspicious Heart

Van Stephenson

Alive 'n' Well

Joe Quarterman

A Taste of Soul Food

Gameface

Something Greater

Alexi

Broken Heart

Ice Kid

Breakthrough

Derrick Dixon

(U Do) That Thing

Bel-Ami

Leroy Barbour Remembers Sam Cooke

Leroy Barbour

Magic Man & the Beat Machine

Drue Davis

So It Seems

Cal-I Jonel

All Over It EP

Berel Alexander

Nomad

Nino Arobelidze

E.P.I.C. (Bliss Instrumentals)

G-Stylez

Soft in the Middle

Dilly O Dilly

Autoheart

Mel Flannery Trucking Co.

Hot Buttered Rum

The M-Tet

At Tha Party

Charles P. Harris

Audio Photograph

Lostsessions

The Holibowl of Soul

Various Artists

Top Albums

Number 1's

Stevie Wonder
Issued as an ecological package that is renewable, recyclable, and biodegradable, Number 1's collects Stevie Wonder's biggest hits beginning with 1963's timeless and irresistible "Fingertips, Pt. 2" and running straight through to "So What the Fuss" (which features Prince on guitar) from Wonder's 2005 comeback album, A Time 2 Love. In between are such enduring touchstones as 1965's "Uptight (Everything Is Alright)," the gritty "Living for the City" and the edgy, uplifting "Higher Ground" from 1973's Innervisions, the wise and pop-elegant "Sir Duke" from 1976's sprawling Songs in the Key of Life, and the reggae-tinged "Master Blaster (Jammin')" from 1980. It all adds up to a nearly 40-year survey of a master songwriter and musician whose unerring ear managed to produce and land songs on the charts that drew from every corner of the pop universe, from soul and R&B to funk, jazz, and reggae, all done with joy, hope, and an underlying intelligence and wisdom that are all too rare in popular culture. For a casual collection that provides all the big radio hits from the start of his career to date, this Stevie Wonder set will be all that many listeners will ever need. The wonder (pun intended), of course, is that what's here is just the tip of the iceberg, and there's so much more when one turns to Wonder's actual albums, particularly the ones from the mid- to late '70s. Throw this in the car and keep it there. It'll take you to some nice places, down memory lane and back again, with songs full of heart and soul.

Steve Leggett, Rovi

Number 1's

Marvin Gaye
Marvin Gaye's Number 1's, like the other Number 1's discs issued by Universal Music Distribution during early 2007, is an attractive package that would nonetheless have trouble surviving a minor spill or even a swift breeze. The disc sits in biodegradable foam, which is protected by a wraparound cardboard sleeve. In fact, the packaging might be lighter than the disc itself. At any rate, there's nothing to complain about when it comes to the contents of the disc: 13 number one hits, released between 1965 and 1982 (credit Universal for licensing "Sexual Healing" from Sony BMG), along with three bonus cuts that stalled at number two. Of course, Gaye's catalog goes fathoms deeper than the chart-toppers, but this makes a fine introduction.

Andy Kellman, Rovi

What's Going On

Marvin Gaye
What's Going On is not only Marvin Gaye's masterpiece, it's the most important and passionate record to come out of soul music, delivered by one of its finest voices, a man finally free to speak his mind and so move from R&B sex symbol to true recording artist. With What's Going On, Gaye meditated on what had happened to the American dream of the past -- as it related to urban decay, environmental woes, military turbulence, police brutality, unemployment, and poverty. These feelings had been bubbling up between 1967 and 1970, during which he felt increasingly caged by Motown's behind-the-times hit machine and restrained from expressing himself seriously through his music. Finally, late in 1970, Gaye decided to record a song that the Four Tops' Obie Benson had brought him, "What's Going On." When Berry Gordy decided not to issue the single, deeming it uncommercial, Gaye refused to record any more material until he relented. Confirmed by its tremendous commercial success in January 1971, he recorded the rest of the album over ten days in March, and Motown released it in late May. Besides cementing Marvin Gaye as one of the most important artists in pop music, What's Going On was far and away the best full-length to issue from the singles-dominated Motown factory, and arguably the best soul album of all time.

Conceived as a statement from the viewpoint of a Vietnam veteran (Gaye's brother Frankie had returned from a three-year hitch in 1967), What's Going On isn't just the question of a baffled soldier returning home to a strange place, but a promise that listeners would be informed by what they heard (that missing question mark in the title certainly wasn't a typo). Instead of releasing listeners from their troubles, as so many of his singles had in the past, Gaye used the album to reflect on the climate of the early '70s, rife with civil unrest, drug abuse, abandoned children, and the spectre of riots in the near past. Alternately depressed and hopeful, angry and jubilant, Gaye saved the most sublime, deeply inspired performances of his career for "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)," "Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)," and "Save the Children." The songs and performances, however, furnished only half of a revolution; little could've been accomplished with the Motown sound of previous Marvin Gaye hits like "Stubborn Kind of Fellow" and "Hitch Hike" or even "I Heard It Through the Grapevine." What's Going On, as he conceived and produced it, was like no other record heard before it: languid, dark, and jazzy, a series of relaxed grooves with a heavy bottom, filled by thick basslines along with bongos, conga, and other percussion. Fortunately, this aesthetic fit in perfectly with the style of longtime Motown session men like bassist James Jamerson and guitarist Joe Messina. When the Funk Brothers were, for once, allowed the opportunity to work in relaxed, open proceedings, they produced the best work of their careers (and indeed, they recognized its importance before any of the Motown executives). Jamerson's playing on "Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)" functions as the low-end foundation but also its melodic hook, while an improvisatory jam by Eli Fountain on alto sax furnished the album's opening flourish. (Much credit goes to Gaye himself for seizing on these often tossed-off lines as precious; indeed, he spent more time down in the Snakepit than he did in the control room.) Just as he'd hoped it would be, What's Going On was Marvin Gaye's masterwork, the most perfect expression of an artist's hope, anger, and concern ever recorded. [This 2002 edition of What's Going On includes the B-side versions of "God Is Love" and "Sad Tomorrows" as bonus tracks.]

John Bush, Rovi

20 All-Time Greatest Hits!

James Brown
While Brown's 30-track, 40-track, and even 50-track collections are excellent choices as well, this fine hits package is the best one for Brown neophytes looking for a way in. Covering his prime stretch from the late '50s through the early '70s, 20 All-Time Greatest Hits! includes early R&B milestones ("Please, Please, Please"), epochal '60s sides ("Papa's Got a Brand New Bag, Pt. 1"), and latter-day funk classics ("Papa Don't Take No Mess, Pt. 1"). And that's not to mention such perennials as "Mother Popcorn," "Hot Pants," "Cold Sweat," and "Think." Start your Brown obsession here.

Stephen Cook, Rovi

Number 1's

James Brown
It's kind of a shame that the first compilation Universal/Polydor released in the wake of James Brown's Christmas 2006 death -- not counting Hip-O Select's ongoing complete singles series, which was in the works prior to the Godfather of Soul's demise -- is an entry in their shabbily assembled budget-line series Number 1's. Not that the music on the comp is bad -- hardly. This is a very good roundup of 19 of the most familiar hits, almost all dating from 1965's "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag" on, with a heavy concentration on late-'60s and early-'70s funk, including Fred Wesley & the JB's "Doing It to Death." Some may complain that there aren't many of the early King singles here -- only "Try Me" -- no "Think," "I'll Go Crazy," "Night Train" or others, but for many casual fans, this is the JB they know best and it's an affordable way to get all the biggest songs in one place. The only drawback is the flimsy cardboard packaging. Sure, it may be 100-percent biodegradable, but it feels disposable -- which is a bit bothersome in normal cases, but since this is the first James Brown disc after his death, it's hard not to wish that it felt a little bit more substantial.

Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Greatest Hits

Bill Withers
At only ten tracks, Greatest Hits is a little brief and doesn't contain much of his earliest material, but it remains a first-rate compilation of Bill Withers' prime hits, featuring "Use Me," "Ain't No Sunshine," "Lean on Me," "Who Is He (And What Is He to You)," and "Just the Two of Us." The latter-day Legacy compilation is a bit more thorough, but this remains a good basic overview.

Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Greatest Hits

Earth, Wind & Fire
Columbia's 1998 collection of Earth, Wind & Fire's Greatest Hits in many ways stands as the group's definitive compilation. Even though there have been more extensive overviews of the group's work, such as the triple-disc set The Eternal Dance, this is the first collection to contain all of the group's biggest hits on one disc. All but one ("Love Music") of the ten songs from 1978's The Best of Earth, Wind & Fire are included, while six of the ten songs from The Best Of, Vol. 2 are featured; the remaining two cuts on the 17-track collection are the minor early single "Kalimba Story" and the album cut "Gratitude." These are fine additions to the album, but the true meat of the collection lies in the hits -- "Shining Star," "That's the Way of the World," "Sing a Song," "Getaway," "Got to Get You Into My Life," "September," "Boogie Wonderland," "After the Love Has Gone," "Let's Groove," and so many others. They might not be presented in chronological order (the only flaw in this otherwise flawless collection), but it's a sheer delight to have all of the hits on one terrifically entertaining and valuable disc.

Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Greatest Hits

Al Green

The Very Best Of Otis Redding

Otis Redding
The Very Best of Otis Redding wasn't the first Otis Redding compilation but it is the best of the single-disc collections, distilling the high points across his career (up thru the posthumous hits "(Sitting' On) The Dock of the Bay" and the heartbreaking "I've Got Dreams to Remember") in 16 tracks, every one a musical milestone and a soul music high-point of one kind or another. Although aimed at the casual listener and the neophyte fan, there are some astonishing realizations to be had in listening to this disc and looking at the chart placements of the early sides, and realizing just how uniform his musical influence is -- "These Arms of Mine" and, especially, "Pain In My Heart," from 1962 and 1963, respectively, sold only a fraction of what his later singles did, yet they've been covered by so many artists since, that they're as familiar as any of the other, bigger hits on this disc. The collection is hardly comprehensive, but all of the major bases are touched, right down to his 1967 hit duet "Tramp" with Carla Thomas. The other advantage, especially for those on a budget, is that this was the first Otis Redding compilation to avail itself of the improved master tape research and analog-to-digital technology of the early '90s.

Bruce Eder, Rovi

Greatest Hits

Maze
Along with a number of very welcome Maze album reissues, in 2004 The Right Stuff compiled what is no doubt the definitive single-disc collection of the Frankie Beverly-led band, titled simply yet accurately Greatest Hits. The 18-track compilation rounds up the four-minute single edits of such hits as "Southern Girl," "Joy and Pain," "Before I Let Go," "Never Let You Down," and "Back in Stride," among numerous others. Because many of these songs in their original states clock around seven or so minutes apiece, these single edits are preferable for a compilation such as this. This way you get as many hits as possible on the disc, and if you indeed like what you hear, you can always go and pick up the individual Maze albums, which are classics in their own right and mighty rewarding listens for lovers of late-'70s funk and early- to mid-'80s urban music. The Right Stuff, a division of Capitol Records, also went out of its way to license a few Maze songs owned by Warner Bros.: "Can't Get Over You" (1989), "Silky Soul" (1989), and "The Morning After" (1993). These latter-day recordings weren't quite as successful as the sort of songs Maze had been recording during the early '80s, but they're nonetheless great songs and an important part of the band's long-running career. All of this amounts to a well-rounded portrait of Maze, even including two live songs: the audience-singalong version of "Joy and Pain" from Live in New Orleans (1981) and a version of the band's signature "Happy Feelin's." You can't ask for a better single-disc introduction to Maze than Greatest Hits. If this disc doesn't turn you on to the band, nothing will.

Jason Birchmeier, Rovi

The Definitive Collection

The Temptations
Arguably Motown's longest-running and most consistent act, the Temptations were top-notch, and this single-disc Motown sampler offers plenty of proof of that, including the classic singles "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "My Girl," "Just My Imagination," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "Cloud Nine," "Psychedelic Shack," and their dramatic masterpiece, "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The songs were always solid, and in spite of the stylistic sea changes of the music industry, the Temptations adapted to the market, continually issuing timeless material, and not many groups could boast a succession of lead singers like David Ruffin, Eddie Kendricks, and Dennis Edwards or producers (and songwriters) like Smokey Robinson and Norman Whitfield. There are several Temptations collections available, but this one presents all the big radio hits, so for most listeners, it'll be just what the doctor ordered.

Steve Leggett, Rovi

All-Time Greatest Hits

Barry White
It took quite a while for a definitive Barry White compilation to hit the market, but All-Time Greatest Hits -- part of Mercury's Funk Essentials series -- finally filled the bill in 1995. Boasting a full 20 tracks from White's heyday of 1973-1978, more than half of which made the R&B Top Ten, All-Time Greatest Hits is easily the most generous single-disc White collection on the market. It includes the edited single versions, not the full-length album tracks, which actually makes for a more digestible introduction to White's achievements. Like his forebear Isaac Hayes, White was not just a deep-voiced crooner, but a talented producer and arranger who'd spent years honing his craft behind the scenes in the industry. And like Hayes, White spent a great deal of time setting up moods on his albums, using lush, sweeping orchestrations to build very gradually to climaxes. (Actually, that probably explains a good deal of his effectiveness.) But White was not simply a Hayes disciple; his swirling productions were less complex than Hayes', but more in tune with the emerging disco sound, which certainly boosted his popularity. Plus, he took full advantage of R&B's new lyrical permissiveness in the wake of Marvin Gaye's Let's Get It On. If his voice was limited, it was also a tremendous asset for the kind of music he recorded -- deep, resonant, caressing, but always suggestively masculine. The total package made White an R&B love-man icon not just for the disco era, but all time. For all but the most dedicated fans, All-Time Greatest Hits is one-stop shopping.

Steve Huey, Rovi

Evolver

John Legend
Evolver is more clever and appealing as an album title than "Dabbler", yet the latter would be much more emblematic of John Legend's third studio album. Legend is up-front about his lane changes, which begin with the album's lead single, "Green Light," decked out in giddy synthesizers à la Paul McCartney's "A Wonderful Christmas Time" (or, OK, the glitziest part of Kanye West's "Flashing Lights") while benefiting from André 3000's off-the-cuff appearance. Following it is "It's Over," a relatively characteristic breakup song that continues to set the tone for the album's anything-goes nature. There's a show-stopping ballad, a reggae-flavored Estelle feature, flashes of tropical lushness, a couple throwbacks to soul-informed soft rock, a track full of chunky synth riffs, a brave topical message song to close, and a couple other diversions throughout. Legend often sounds like he is occupied by the satisfaction that comes with hearing what his vocal cords are capable of achieving.

Andy Kellman, Rovi

Trouble Man

Marvin Gaye
In 1972, things were rapidly shifting in Marvin Gaye's world. He was coming off of one of his most wide-reaching hit albums with 1971's instant classic What's Going On, and his recording contract with Motown subsidiary Tamla was renewed for a cool million dollars and total creative control, making him one of the most successful R&B artists of his day. With Motown's offices migrating west from Detroit to Los Angeles, Gaye followed suit, beginning work on Trouble Man, both the score to a blaxploitation film of the same name and the soundtrack that would be his next album. With minimal singing (Gaye sings through only the title track, adding fragmentary vocalizations minimally throughout the rest of the album), Gaye wrote, arranged, and conducted the entire soundtrack, working with both Motown players and a full orchestra over the course of its recording. It's been speculated by some that Trouble Man was a concerted effort to move away from the expectations of a carbon-copy follow-up to the almost immeasurably high standards of What's Going On, but it's best to look at the record as an entity unto itself rather than the next Marvin Gaye album in the chain. Though largely absent of his one-of-a-kind vocal presence, the arrangements are richer and more sophisticated than the majority of early blaxploitation fare, with some of the same theatricality and filmic urgency of the best Morricone or David Axelrod soundtracks. With instrumentation more ambitious than even the enormity of What's Going On, Trouble Man never stays in one place for long. "'T' Plays It Cool" paints a hustling cityscape with its solid beat and nervous synthesizer bubbles. Plaintive sax trades verses with rudimentary keyboards and Marvin's soulful wails on "Life Is a Gamble," and mournful passages of chamber strings give way to bounding funk grooves. Isaac Hayes' Shaft soundtrack would become debatably more widely remembered than the movie it scored, and Curtis Mayfield's Superfly soundtrack had a similar reception. Likewise, Trouble Man the soundtrack album outperformed "Trouble Man" the movie by leaps and bounds, enjoying Top 20 chart success in its day while the movie sank rapidly into obscurity. Looking at the album outside the trends of its era and inward to the art that Gaye was sculpting shows Trouble Man as a mostly wordless statement on the rapidly changing times for both young black America and Marvin's personal life. The compositions well over with equal parts tension and detached cool, moving through modes of heartbreaking struggle, searching wonder, and playful street scenes. While it's been relegated to the lesser status of Gaye's one-off blaxploitation soundtrack, it rises far above the wandering wah-wah guitars and dated bongos of its peers. Trouble Man might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What's Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it's very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work.

Fred Thomas, Rovi

Love Songs

The Isley Brothers
It's hard to believe that Ronnie Isley collaborated with Dr. Dre and the departed Tupac Shakur on some of the late 20th century's most hardcore hip-hop music. Isley, of the renowned group the Isley Brothers, has his roots firmly placed in '70s R&B and soul music. D'Angelo, Maxwell, and R. Kelly, among other bedroom-music artists, all owe a bit of thanks to the Isley Brothers, the original slow-jam crooners. The trio's sexiest and most sensual moments have been captured on Love Songs, an ongoing series of CD collections of the same name on Columbia Legacy and Epic Legacy Records. (Other Love Songs sets for 2001 include recordings from Frank Sinatra, Patti LaBelle, Aretha Franklin, and Duke Ellington.) And as far as thematic compilations go, this one is a winner. The 13 selected tracks on Love Songs don't skip a beat, and the sexy boudoir fare remains consistent throughout the album's 70-plus minutes. There is a certain sensitivity inherent to Isley's falsetto voice that sets him apart from other singers in this category of music. It's a vulnerability and tenderness that Barry White, and others of the like, do not have. Such Isley Brothers greats as "For the Love of You," "Voyage to Atlantis," "Sensuality," and "Between the Sheets" are included on Love Songs. The CD is a treasured example of the original bedroom music, and arguably more potent than its contemporary counterparts. No amount of pheromones, love potions, or "spells" can come close to the romantic rendezvous that is the Isley Brothers' Love Songs. Play this album at your own risk -- and expect to call in "sick" to the office the next day.

Liana Jonas, Rovi

Songs In The Key Of Life

Stevie Wonder
Songs in the Key of Life was Stevie Wonder's longest, most ambitious collection of songs, a two-LP (plus accompanying EP) set that -- just as the title promised -- touched on nearly every issue under the sun, and did it all with ambitious (even for him), wide-ranging arrangements and some of the best performances of Wonder's career. The opening "Love's in Need of Love Today" and "Have a Talk with God" are curiously subdued, but Stevie soon kicks into gear with "Village Ghetto Land," a fierce exposé of ghetto neglect set to a satirical Baroque synthesizer. Hot on its heels comes the torrid fusion jam "Contusion," a big, brassy hit tribute to the recently departed Duke Ellington in "Sir Duke," and (another hit, this one a Grammy winner as well) the bumping poem to his childhood, "I Wish." Though they didn't necessarily appear in order, Songs in the Key of Life contains nearly a full album on love and relationships, along with another full album on issues social and spiritual. Fans of the love album Talking Book can marvel that he sets the bar even higher here, with brilliant material like the tenderly cathartic and gloriously redemptive "Joy Inside My Tears," the two-part, smooth-and-rough "Ordinary Pain," the bitterly ironic "All Day Sucker," or another classic heartbreaker, "Summer Soft." Those inclined toward Stevie Wonder the social-issues artist had quite a few songs to focus on as well: "Black Man" was a Bicentennial school lesson on remembering the vastly different people who helped build America; "Pastime Paradise" examined the plight of those who live in the past and have little hope for the future; "Village Ghetto Land" brought listeners to a nightmare of urban wasteland; and "Saturn" found Stevie questioning his kinship with the rest of humanity and amusingly imagining paradise as a residency on a distant planet. If all this sounds overwhelming, it is; Stevie Wonder had talent to spare during the mid-'70s, and instead of letting the reserve trickle out during the rest of the decade, he let it all go with one massive burst. (His only subsequent record of the '70s was the similarly gargantuan but largely instrumental soundtrack Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants.)

John Bush, Rovi

The House That Dirt Built

The Heavy
Bands that look to the '60s and '70s for inspiration are nothing new in the realm of rock music -- it seems every year, a new group appears that sounds like they thoroughly studied and regurgitated their parents' album collection. But when you find a band that manages to recall vintage sounds of the past and also put its own unique spin on the proceedings, then you've found something special. And that's exactly what the Heavy accomplish on their sophomore full-length, 2009's House That Dirt Built. Borrowing equally from garage rock and soul sounds from yesteryear (as well as merging in hip-hop beats, to boot), House That Dirt Built is one mightily impressive musical magic carpet ride. Singer Kelvin Swaby has the whole Rob Tyner/soul thang down pat (as evidenced by such ditties as "Love Like That"), and his bandmates keep pace throughout, with explosive rockers ("Oh No! Not You Again!"), Jack White-meets-James Brown grooves ("How You Like Me Now"), and a lush sonic sign-off ("Stuck"). Vintage rock revival done right.

Greg Prato, Rovi

Greatest Hits, Volume 1

The Isley Brothers

30 Greatest Hits

Aretha Franklin

Number 1's

The Temptations
Released in early 2007 as part of Universal's extensive and cheaply packaged Number 1's: Temptations series (see also: volumes dedicated to James Brown and Marvin Gaye), this disc compiles 19 number one R&B singles from the Temptations. It's worth mentioning that some of the inclusions -- "The Way You Do the Things You Do," "You're My Everything," "I'm Gonna Make You Love Me," "Ball of Confusion" -- were number ones on the Cash Box chart, rather than the Billboard chart (the usual source), and 1998's "Stay" is a bit of a stretch since it topped Billboard's Urban Adult Contemporary chart. Nothing can argue against the set as a decent introduction to the group, even though several great singles -- such as "Cloud Nine" -- peaked below the top spots.

Andy Kellman, Rovi

Greatest Hits: Lean On Me

Bill Withers

Greatest Hits

Sam Cooke
Although it isn't as sublime as the definitive The Man and His Music, Greatest Hits still does a good job of rounding up the majority of Sam Cooke's biggest pop hits. Ironically, it doesn't have enough gospel or R&B cuts, skipping over such essentials as "Touch the Hem of His Garment," "Ain't That Good News," and "A Change Is Gonna Come" in favor of such pop hits as "Sugar Dumpling." However, it has just enough songs that aren't on The Man and His Music to make it worth exploring for fans who haven't been able to hear some of this material before, since some of these songs have been out of print for years. Nevertheless, it's targeted for the curious and the novice, and even with its omissions, Greatest Hits does provide a reasonably effective overview of his pop career.

Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Portrait Of A Legend

Sam Cooke
Some 46 years after his first pop hit, and 39 years after his death, comes only the second attempt at a comprehensive Sam Cooke collection. Portrait of a Legend 1951-1964 eclipses RCA's early-'80s The Man and His Music, going it better in running time but losing some important recordings -- "That's Heaven to Me" and "Soothe Me," arguably one of Cooke's most important songs -- in the process of summing up his career. From 1951's Soul Stirrers' gospel classic "Touch the Hem of His Garment" through to 1964's "A Change Is Gonna Come" and "Shake," we get highlights of Cooke's career presented in state-of-the-art digital audio; superior in every way possible to the audio quality of The Man and His Music. What's more, this is a hybrid disc with SACD capability, and the sound on that layer is almost as much of a jump above the quality on the CD layer as this remastering is from the old The Man and His Music disc; and either the standard CD or the SACD playback makes that 1980s-issued compilation sound faint and anemic. There's also annotation here -- which was totally lacking on the earlier CD -- by Peter Guralnick, which delves very effectively into the background of each song. And the producers have taken the trouble to be a little inventive in the programming -- it would have been easy enough to follow a strict chronological approach, but instead the disc opens and closes with tracks that reveal Cooke's gospel roots, which is pretty much where his music started and where it ended up, bookending his first hit with songs from his first session ever.

Bruce Eder, Rovi

Top Songs

Superstition

Stevie Wonder

September

Earth, Wind & Fire

[Sittin' On] The Dock Of The Bay

Otis Redding

Down On Me

Jeremih

Short Change Hero

The Heavy

Unchained Melody

The Righteous Brothers

Ain't No Sunshine

Bill Withers

Come On Eileen

Dexys Midnight Runners

Sexual Healing

Marvin Gaye

I Just Called To Say I Love You

Stevie Wonder

Low Rider

War

A Change Is Gonna Come

Sam Cooke

My Girl

The Temptations

Let's Groove

Earth, Wind & Fire

Isn't She Lovely

Stevie Wonder

Lean On Me

Bill Withers

How You Like Me Now

The Heavy

Reunited

Peaches & Herb

Brick House

Commodores

Try A Little Tenderness

Otis Redding

Build Me Up Buttercup

The Foundations

Get Here

Oleta Adams