New Releases

G I R L

Pharrell Williams

Blurred Lines

Robin Thicke

Blurred Lines (Deluxe)

Robin Thicke

Love In The Future (Deluxe Edition)

John Legend

Black Panties

R. Kelly

Talk Dirty

Jason Derulo

Kiss Land

The Weeknd

A Mary Christmas

Mary J. Blige

Now, Then & Forever

Earth, Wind & Fire

Braveheart

Ashanti

Love and War

Tamar Braxton

Winter Loversland

Tamar Braxton

Neon (Edited Version)

Jay Sean

Neon (Explicit Version)

Jay Sean

Sail Out

Jhené Aiko

Rebellious Soul

K. Michelle

SoMo

SoMo

The Electric Lady

Janelle Monáe

Living For The Weekend

The Saturdays

Body Music

AlunaGeorge

Lucid

Lyfe Jennings

Appreciation Day

Jaheim

Glück und Benzin

Miss Platnum

Top Albums

Testimony (Deluxe)

August Alsina

Sail Out

Jhené Aiko

Love In The Future (Deluxe Edition)

John Legend

G I R L

Pharrell Williams

channel ORANGE (Explicit Version)

Frank Ocean
Coming on the heels of 2011's heralded Tumblr-only freebie effort Nostalgia Ultra, Frank Ocean's proper debut Channel Orange firmly establishes the singer/songwriter as one of music's most unique storytellers. His tales tend toward the hyper-personal and are so steeped in naive optimism—even in the face of tragedy and defeat—that they could easily be read as either deeply moving or incredibly cheesy. At their best, they're both. Frank and producer Malay blend and wear their musical influences proudly, finding a sonic middle ground between vintage Stevie Wonder and recent N.E.R.D. Unfortunately, they tend to favor the formlessness of the latter, as Frank's meandering narratives about drug dealers and users and Los Angeles brats gone wild supersede his concern for traditional hook writing and song structure. But, by the album's second half, this ceases to be a weakness. Late cuts like the taxicab catharsis of "Bad Religion" and "Pink Matter," an epic duet with Outkast's Andre 3000 that invokes the human life cycle and Dragonball Z, operate with such naked honesty that they transcend the need for form.

-- – Andrew Nosnitsky, Google Play

808s & Heartbreak

Kanye West
Remember when Kanye West threatened to make an album where he would bear his heartbroken soul, align with T-Pain, sing on every song with the then inescapable Auto-Tune effect, and lean on the Roland TR-808 drum machine? It could have been a wreck, a case of an artist working through paralyzing heartache while loose in a toy store. Except West wasn't joking. In various spots across 808s & Heartbreak, the constant flutter of West's processed voice is enlivened by the disarming manner in which despair and dejection are conveyed. Several tracks have almost as much in common with irrefutably bleak post-punk albums as contemporary rap and R&B. For anyone sifting through a broken relationship and self-letdown, this could all be therapeutic.

SoMo

SoMo

School of Roses

Christon Gray

Thriller

Michael Jackson
Off the Wall was a massive success, spawning four Top Ten hits (two of them number ones), but nothing could have prepared Michael Jackson for Thriller. Nobody could have prepared anybody for the success of Thriller, since the magnitude of its success was simply unimaginable -- an album that sold 40 million copies in its initial chart run, with "seven" of its nine tracks reaching the Top Ten (for the record, the terrific "Baby Be Mine" and the pretty good ballad "The Lady in My Life" are not like the others). This was a record that had something for everybody, building on the basic blueprint of Off the Wall by adding harder funk, hard rock, softer ballads, and smoother soul -- expanding the approach to have something for every audience. That alone would have given the album a good shot at a huge audience, but it also arrived precisely when MTV was reaching its ascendancy, and Jackson helped the network by being not just its first superstar, but first black star as much as the network helped him. This all would have made it a success (and its success, in turn, served as a new standard for success), but it stayed on the charts, turning out singles, for nearly two years because it was really, really good. True, it wasn't as tight as Off the Wall -- and the ridiculous, late-night house-of-horrors title track is the prime culprit, arriving in the middle of the record and sucking out its momentum -- but those one or two cuts don't detract from a phenomenal set of music. It's calculated, to be sure, but the chutzpah of those calculations (before this, nobody would even have thought to bring in metal virtuoso Eddie Van Halen to play on a disco cut) is outdone by their success. This is where a song as gentle and lovely as "Human Nature" coexists comfortably with the tough, scared "Beat It," the sweet schmaltz of the Paul McCartney duet "The Girl Is Mine," and the frizzy funk of "P.Y.T. (Pretty Young Thing)." And, although this is an undeniably fun record, the paranoia is already creeping in, manifesting itself in the record's two best songs: "Billie Jean," where a woman claims Michael is the father of her child, and the delirious "Wanna Be Startin' Something," the freshest funk on the album, but the most claustrophobic, scariest track Jackson ever recorded. These give the record its anchor and are part of the reason why the record is more than just a phenomenon. The other reason, of course, is that much of this is just simply great music.

Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Black Panties (Deluxe Version)

R. Kelly

Talk Dirty

Jason Derulo

Downtown: Life Under The Gun

August Alsina

Street Songs

Rick James
Disappointed because Garden of Love wasn't as well-received as it should have been, Rick James made a triumphant return to defiant, in-your-face funk with the triple-platinum Street Songs. This was not only his best-selling album ever, it was also his best period, and certainly the most exciting album released in 1981. The gloves came all the way off this time, and James is as loud and proud as ever on such arresting hits as "Super Freak," "Give It to Me, Baby," and "Ghetto Life." Ballads aren't a high priority, but those he does offer (including his stunning duet with Teena Marie, "Fire and Desire,") are first-rate. One song that's questionable (to say the least) is the inflammatory "Mr. Policeman," a commentary on police misconduct that condemns law enforcement in general instead of simply indicting those who abuse their authority. But then, the thing that makes this hot-headed diatribe extreme is what makes the album on the whole so arresting -- honest, gut-level emotion. James simply follows what's in his gut and lets it rip. Even the world's most casual funksters shouldn't be without this pearl of an album. [The reissue of Street Songs adds 12" mixes of "Give It to Me Baby" and "Super Freak" as bonus tracks.]

Alex Henderson, Rovi

Blurred Lines

Robin Thicke

Loud

Rihanna
At her best, Rihanna blends machinated artifice with softness and pathos. She often flits between these two opposites, but her 2010 album Loud strikes a near-perfect balance. Her previous album, 2009's Rated R, was a pessimistic response to a humiliating assault by onetime boyfriend Chris Brown on the eve of the 2009 Grammys. And it's easy to hear Loud as a dialogue with her former paramour, but the album sounds redemptive. It's full of songs about rough sex, like "S&M" and "Skin," but Rihanna sounds like she's embracing her own kinky pleasure, and she sounds angelic over the trance pop of "Only Girl (In the World)." If Rated R was defensive, then Loud strikes an introspective and regretful tone, sometimes with necessary violence on the dancehall-tinged "Man Down," other times with the codependent romance of "Love the Way You Lie." "Maybe I'm a masochist," she sings on the latter. Rihanna's sexual politics are undeniably complicated, but it wouldn't matter if Loud wasn't a great R&B/pop album.

Mosi Reeves, Google Play

Call Me Crazy, But...

Sevyn Streeter

Trilogy

The Weeknd
In 2011, Abel Tesfaye, aka the Weeknd, released three free mixtapes, House of Balloons, Thursday, and Echoes of Silence. Trilogy compiles them with remastered sound and adds three new songs. Tesfaye expresses unapologetically sordid feelings about drugs, partying, drugs, bad girls, drugs, strippers, drugs, good girls gone bad, and drugs -- all of which serve an identical purpose and get the same level of consideration. There are points throughout these works where Tesfaye is distinctively gripping, supplying deadly hooks and somehow singing for his life despite the cold blood flowing through his veins. When this package was released, he was gaining mainstream momentum with appearances on Drake's "Crew Love" and Wiz Khalifa's "Remember You." His potential is as obvious as his lyrics are toxic.

Andy Kellman, Rovi

Love, Marriage‎ & Divorce

Toni Braxton

Number Ones

Michael Jackson
Since Michael Jackson botched his first hits collection by pairing it with a new album of material in a double-disc set, making it considerably less attractive for those legions of listeners who want just a single disc of hits, it's both inevitable and welcome that he attempted another compilation a few years later. This second collection, Number Ones, was released in the wake of the 2000 blockbuster Beatles 1, which rewrote the rules of modern-day hits collections from major artists, since it not only contained a generous, representative cross section of hits, it had a specific focus and did gangbuster business. An avalanche of similar-minded compilations by other titans followed, notably Elvis' 30 #1 Hits and the Rolling Stones' Forty Licks, and MJ's Number Ones is part of that wave. For some artists, sticking to number one hits isn't a bad way to make a collection -- the Beatles are a perfect example, actually, since even if 1 didn't contain such seminal items as "Strawberry Fields Forever," it still offered a full, representative portrait of their career. Jackson doesn't fare so well by the number one rule. First of all, he doesn't strictly "follow" the number one rule, leaving behind the number one hit duet "Say Say Say" with Paul McCartney, substituting a 1981 live version of "Ben" for the original hit, adding "Break of Dawn," an Invincible album cut never released as a single, and including "Thriller," "Smooth Criminal," and "Earth Song," none of which hit number one, and the latter wasn't even released as a single in the U.S. (there is, of course, the requisite previously unreleased song, the OK slow jam "One More Chance"). Then, there's the fact that Thriller changed the business, inaugurating the era of the blockbuster album that rode the charts for years, spinning off hit singles every quarter. Thriller generated tons of hits -- six of its nine tracks hit the charts, but only two of them hit number one. Its successor, Bad, had seven of its 11 songs hit the charts (one other, the CD bonus cut "Leave Me Alone," was a staple on MTV), and of those, five peaked at number one. So, by sticking to number ones, and adding "Smooth Criminal," this collection skews very heavily toward Bad, at times playing like an expanded reissue with bonus tracks. This may be a fairly accurate reading of chart positions, but it doesn't result in a particularly representative collection, since the brilliant Off the Wall is granted only two songs, leaving behind such charting hits as "Off the Wall" and "She's Out of My Life" (both gold singles, mind you), and Thriller is represented by only three tracks, with such defining songs as "Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'," "Human Nature," "PYT (Pretty Young Thing)," and "The Girl Is Mine" being left behind. These two albums are the core of Jackson's legacy, and it simply feels wrong that Number Ones gives them short shrift. Dangerous also is neglected, providing just one selection, when on the whole it had far more memorable songs than HIStory or Invincible. But these problems are inherent with any collection that concentrates just on the charts, not the music that got the songs on the charts in the first place. And while Number Ones contains enough of the big songs to recommend it for those listeners who are looking just for a cross section of the biggest hits from Jackson's career, it is also true that the perfect Michael Jackson hits collection has yet to be assembled. Maybe next time, particularly if he's granted an entry into Sony's generally excellent The Essentials series.

Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Three Kings

TGT

FutureSex/LoveSounds

Justin Timberlake

Love and War

Tamar Braxton

Z

SZA

Rebellious Soul

K. Michelle

Top Songs

All of Me

John Legend

Talk Dirty (feat. 2 Chainz)

Jason Derulo

Na Na

Trey Songz

The Worst

Jhené Aiko

Blurred Lines

Robin Thicke

Loyal (East Coast Version)

Chris Brown

Hold On, We're Going Home

Drake

Paranoid (feat. B.o.B)

Ty Dolla $ign

Mirrors

Justin Timberlake

Can't Raise A Man

K. Michelle

Stay (Explicit)

Rihanna

Happy (From Despicable Me 2)

Pharrell Williams

Ride

SoMo

Up Down (Do This All Day)

T-Pain

Yeah!

Usher

Girl On Fire (Inferno Version)

Alicia Keys

S&M

Rihanna

Come Get It Bae

Pharrell Williams

It Won't Stop (feat. Chris Brown)

Sevyn Streeter

SexyBack

Justin Timberlake

Thriller

Michael Jackson

Primetime (feat. Miguel)

Janelle Monáe

nEXt

Sevyn Streeter