New Releases

A Dotted Line

Nickel Creek

Resituación

Nacho Vegas

Haul Away!

Liz Green

Cover Sessions: Vol. 1

Boyce Avenue

Armor

Landon Austin

Classic

Landon Austin

The Covers, Vol. 7

Savannah Outen

Zoé

Zoé

Mythmaker

Andy McKee

Private Eyes

Sleeping at Last

Newy Lewis and the Hues: Greatest Hits

Ben Rector

The Fake Headlines

Andrew Bird

Live At the Union Chapel London

Billy Bragg

Together or Apart

Haze

Against the Grain

Temples

Live in Washington DC (Solo)

Johnny Flynn

Empire

HelenaMaria

Magic

HelenaMaria

Well Pleased

Chas & Dave

Greatest Rarities

Chas & Dave

Flying

Chas & Dave

Reunited

Barbara Dickson

Top Albums

Graceland - 25th Anniversary Edition

Paul Simon
Paul Simon's dazzling mix of American roots music, South African pop and highly personal songcraft instantly became one of the key albums of the 1980s and is now internationally considered among the greatest of all time. The zydeco rush of "Boy in the Bubble" and the autobiographical title track both offer musical comfort to confusing, sometimes deadly, modern landscapes, while the transcendent "Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes" brings magical realism to gritty urban streets.

-- Nick Dedina, Google Play

All The Little Lights

Passenger
"All The Little Lights" is the breakthrough album by Passenger, featuring the global hit single 'Let Her Go.'

A Dotted Line

Nickel Creek

In Between Dreams

Jack Johnson
Singer/songwriter Jack Johnson writes songs that just feel good, sticking to an equation that combines his warm, relaxed voice with an acoustic guitar. That cozy formula made him a favorite among American college crowds, so it's no surprise that Johnson sticks with what he does best for his third album, In Between Dreams. Producer Mario Caldato, Jr. is back again, touching up Johnson's summery backdrop for another playful set of songs. The genre-blending charm and sweetness that fueled Brushfire Fairytales and On and On hasn't changed that much, but does it really have to? Johnson, alongside drummer Adam Topol and bassist Merlo Podlewski, makes safe records. While there isn't anything wrong with that, taking a few more risks sonically and lyrically wouldn't work against him. Tender moments such as "If I Could" and "No Other Way" showcase a more reserved side on In Between Dreams. Other highlights include the lullaby-like "Breakdown" and the bossa nova rhythms of "Do You Remember." Whether he's singing about being in love -- which he does quite well on "Better Together" and "Banana Pancakes" -- or reflecting on its hardships, Johnson's laid-back approach is his biggest strength. In Between Dreams is a bit brighter and more upbeat, but his song remains the same.

MacKenzie Wilson, Rovi

The Blessed Unrest

Sara Bareilles

Lungs

Florence & The Machine
Precocious Brit Florence Welch fired a bullet into the head of the U.K. music scene in 2008 with the single "Kiss with a Fist," a punk-infused, perfectly juvenile summer anthem that had critics wiping the names Lily Allen, Amy Winehouse, and Kate Nash from their vocabularies and replacing them with Florence + the Machine. While the comparisons were apt at the time, "Kiss with a Fist" turned out to be a red herring in the wake of the release of Lungs, one of the most musically mature and emotionally mesmerizing albums of 2009. With an arsenal of weaponry that included the daring musicality of Kate Bush, the fearless delivery of Sinéad O'Connor, and the dark, unhinged vulnerability of Fiona Apple, the London native crafted a debut that not only lived up to the machine-gun spray of buzz that heralded her arrival, but easily surpassed it. Like Kate Bush, Welch has little interest (for the most part) in traditional pop structures, and her songs are at their best when they see something sparkle in the woods and veer off of the main trail in pursuit. "Kiss with a Fist," as good as it is, pales in comparison to standout cuts like "Dog Days Are Over," "Hurricane Drunk," "Drumming Song," "Rabbit Heart (Raise It Up)," and "Cosmic Love," all of which are anchored to the earth by Welch's knockout voice, a truly impressive and intuitive trio of producers, and a backing band that sounds as intimate with the material as its creator. [Lungs was also released in a Deluxe Edition that included Lungs: The B-Sides, a bonus disc featuring studio tracks like “Swimming,” “Falling,” and “Heavy in Your Arms,” the latter of which appeared on the soundtrack for Twilight Saga: Eclipse, as well as live cuts (“You've Got the Dirtee Love"), demos (“Ghosts”), and remixes (the "Yeasayer Remix" of “Dog Days Are Over").]

James Christopher Monger, Rovi

The Civil Wars

The Civil Wars

lovestrong.

Christina Perri
Philadelphia-born, Los Angeles-based singer/songwriter Christina Perri found herself bearing the complex weight of a surprise platinum-selling hit in 2010 with the bare-bones break-up ballad “Jar of Hearts.” Her performance of the track on the Fox show "So You Think You Can Dance" landed her a contract with Atlantic Records, and with that, the pressures of eking out a quality, full-length debut in time to capitalize on her overnight success (listeners who picked up the rushed, 2010 Ocean Way Sessions EP will find most of the cuts here in attendance). Luckily, the tracks that make up Lovestrong, are cut from the same cloth as her signature hit. Songs like “Bluebird,” “Arms,” “Sad Song,” and “Black + Blue,” the latter of which feels like an update on events post-“Jar of Hearts,” find Perri in her comfort zone, trading barbs with past lovers over melodies spawned from countless hours listening to Brandi Carlile's “The Story,” Radiohead's “Creep,” and Jewel’s “Who Will Save Your Soul?” It’s a formula she rarely deviates from, and at 15 cuts, the endless soul searching and constant barrage of wine glass-gazing, post-relationship, magnetic poetry can get a bit thin, but her pleasant, even-handed voice and gifts for using familiar melodies in new and surprising ways (witness the countless YouTube mash-ups of "Jar of Hearts" and Beyonce's "Halo") helps to keep Lovestrong from sinking itself, no matter how much its author wishes for the cold comfort of deep waters.

The Greatest Hits 1970-2002 (Double US CD)

Elton John
Greatest Hits 1970-2002 is a nearly flawless double-disc set commemorating Elton John's three-decade career. Disc one features what may arguably be John's most essential work: Seeing songs such as "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting," "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road," "Candle in the Wind," and "Bennie and the Jets" -- not to mention "Your Song," "Rocket Man," and "Tiny Dancer" -- lined up back to back reaffirms just how diverse, and yet universal, his songwriting talent is. Disc two finds this talent maturing gracefully into the '80s, '90s, and beyond, touching on pop gems like "Don't Go Breaking My Heart," "I'm Still Standing," and "I Guess That's Why They Call It the Blues" as well as his Lion King classic "Can You Feel the Love Tonight?" and the Aida duet "Written in the Stars" with LeAnn Rimes. The collection also finds room for the highlights of his most recent albums, including Made in England's "Believe" and "Blessed," The Big Picture's "Something About the Way You Look Tonight," and Songs from the West Coast's "This Train Don't Stop Here Anymore." For most casual fans, Greatest Hits 1970-2002 will replace the need for collections such as Greatest Hits, Greatest Hits, Vol. 2, and Greatest Hits, Vol. 3, although these collections are still worthwhile as of-their-time retrospectives of John's work.

Heather Phares, Rovi

16 Biggest Hits

John Denver
RCA\Legacy's 16 Biggest Hits collects (you guessed it) 16 classic cuts from the legendary singer/songwriter, including "Back Home Again," "Rocky Mountain High," "Take Me Home, Country Roads," and "Annie's Song." Notable omissions such as "Calypso," "Grandma's Feather Bed," and "Perhaps Love" keep this skimpy overview from providing any real cultural impact, but there is enough here to recommended it if it arrives as the result of charity.

James Christopher Monger, Rovi

Photographs & Memories: His Greatest Hits

Jim Croce
Though Jim Croce produced a handful of hit singles before his death, one can nonetheless argue that Croce was and is a rather underrated songwriter. This is especially evident in listening to his album tracks, many of which are remarkably potent and arguably could have been hits themselves. The numerous double-disc collections that have been released echo this factor, but for casual fans who merely want the radio favorites, the single-disc Photographs & Memories will suffice. All of Croce's biggest singles are here, including "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown," "Time in a Bottle," and "Operator," as well as overlooked album tracks such as "New York's Not My Home" and "Lover's Cross." This is far from a perfect compilation; the album barely clocks in over 40 minutes, leaving time for numerous tracks that could have easily been added onto the same disc during the record's move from vinyl to CD. Still, it's hard to argue with what's here. While Croce's more devoted followers would prefer the double-disc 50th Anniversary Collection, casual listeners merely in search of Croce's well-known songs would be best suited with Photographs & Memories.

Barry Weber, Rovi

Greatest Hits

Neil Young
It may be hard to believe, but 2004's Greatest Hits is not only the first retrospective Neil Young has released since 1977's Decade, it's the first ever single-disc collection of his best-known songs. That's a span of 27 years separating the two collections, which is an awful long time to resist a Greatest Hits disc -- many of his peers succumbed, offering countless comps during those years -- and such a resistance to a compilation may not be much a surprise from the legendarily prickly Young, but what is a surprise is that 11 of the 16 songs on Greatest Hits were also on Decade. Of the five songs that were not on Decade, only two date from after the '70s -- 1989's "Rockin' in the Free World" and 1992's "Harvest Moon" -- while one of the remaining three (1970's "Only Love Can Break Your Heart") comes from the time chronicled on Decade; the other two, 1978's "Comes a Time" and 1979's "Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black)," arrived in the two years of the '70s not covered on the 1977 compilation. All this means is that Greatest Hits offers the basic canon, with no frills and none of Neil's trademark idiosyncrasy. Some may miss that cantankerous spirit, pointing out that this contains nothing from his towering twin masterpieces of dark introspection -- Tonight's the Night and On the Beach -- or that there's nothing from Buffalo Springfield (which was covered on Decade) and that noteworthy songs like "Powderfinger," "Cortez the Killer," "Lotta Love," and "Long May You Run" are missing. Ultimately, that doesn't matter much, because Greatest Hits has all the songs that every Neil Young fan, from the devoted to the casual listener, agrees are his biggest and best: "Down by the River," "Cinnamon Girl," "Helpless," "After the Gold Rush," "Southern Man," "Ohio," "The Needle and the Damage Done," "Old Man," "Heart of Gold," "Like a Hurricane." And that's why it works as an all-business introduction for the uninitiated and as a concise summary for those not willing to travel down all the long, winding roads Young has traveled over the years. In other words, it's as good a compilation as it could have been. [Greatest Hits was released in several editions. In addition to the basic single CD, there was a limited edition containing a DVD video with the promo clips for "Rockin' in the Free World" and "Harvest Moon." There was another limited edition with a bonus 7" record. Finally, it was also released as a high-resolution DVD Audio disc.]

Brushfire Fairytales (Bonus Version)

Jack Johnson
Jack Johnson, the multi-talented American guy who likes to surf and play music, makes an honest impression on his debut album, Brushfire Fairytales. He's not focused on any genre in particular, but stays close to acoustic simplicities. Ben Harper's producer, J.P. Plunier, lends a hand and perfects Johnson's basic songwriting into a charming and inviting soundscape of songs most personal to Johnson. It's poetically abrasive, especially on tracks like "Sexy Plexi" and "Fortunate Fool." He's a bit of a lovesucker, but Brushfire Fairytales isn't necessarily constructed to be on that target. Jack Johnson is a regular guy and his most natural feelings are indeed candid. "Inaudible Melodies" is a bluesy mix of lazy harmonies and acoustical twitching, whereas "Flake" is an easy flow of American trad rock, quite similar to Dave Matthews, but echoing steel drums and Harper's blistering lap steel guitar make for an outstanding rock & roll romp. Johnson's voice, which is hauntingly like Wes Cunningham, makes Brushfire Fairytales a decent record. He's not noisy or gregarious; he's content with his new creative finding. He might chase waves in his other life, but his songwriting ways do make for something quite charming. [The Japanese version includes a live version of "Inaudible Melodies."]

Wild Youth EP

Daughter

Greatest Hits

David Gray
Those looking to score their Sunday afternoons with polished, midtempo ruminations of life and love could do much worse than this compilation of David Gray's best work. "Babylon" is the only track to have previously enjoyed much chart success in the States, and many American listeners will find Greatest Hits to be more of a primer to Gray's acoustic-fueled style than a collection of past hits. But for returning fans -- particularly those who already own Shine: The Best of the Early Years, also released in 2007 -- Greatest Hits is a cohesive disc that paints the picture of a seasoned songwriter. Gray didn't start writing hit songs until four albums into his career; as a result, these tracks sound sophisticated and tasteful, quite possibly because they draw their maturity from years of touring, recording, and label-hopping. Also included are 14 pages of liner notes (written by Gray himself in track-by-track format) as well as two new numbers, "You're the World to Me" and "Destroyer," which bookend the CD with the sort of clean, crisp pop/rock that will always find a home on adult contemporary charts. David Gray's music doesn't quite electrify, but it rarely fails to please, making Greatest Hits a nice commercial companion to the fans-only appeal of Shine.

Andrew Leahey, Rovi

The Devil Makes Three

The Devil Makes Three
The Devil Makes Three have been setting the San Francisco Bay Area ablaze with their hyper driven version of old-time music. The trio's sound combines bluegrass, primitive country music, folk, rockabilly, Piedmont blues, and ragtime, played with a blazing post-punk attack. They don't have a drummer, but when Cooper McBean's percussive rhythm guitar accents and Lucia Turino's crackling slap-hand bass kick in, they supply a pounding four on the floor that drives the band as hard as any drummer might. Guitarist, lead singer, and chief songwriter Pete Bernhard completes the trio with vocals that are as rhythmic as they are melodic, a bluesy, jazzy style that's part Cab Calloway, part Ralph Stanley, part Blind Willie McTell. This eponymous debut was put out by the Devil Makes Three on their own Monkey Wrench label in 2002 and more recently picked up for national distribution by Milan, a label planning to pitch the trio's songs to filmmakers and television show producers looking for music with a folksy, rootsy feel. The songs on The Devil Makes Three are the backbone of the band's live shows, marked by impressive energy, mordant humor, and timeless lyrics. The remastering makes the instruments crackle and pop, and pushes the vocals a bit more up front. The Devil Makes Three inhabit a hardscrabble working-class world full of problem drinkers, tellers of tall tales, pirates, and troublemakers, but they deliver their desperate parables with a charming deadpan wit. "The Plank" is rollicking sea shanty that has the bandmembers watching their enemies walk the plank. "Graveyard" is a bleary waltz rife with images of shipwrecks, broken dreams, booze, and delirium tremens. The ragtime bounce of "Shades" is a portrait of a good-time girl and her beau, who are usually drunk by noon. "Chained to the Couch" mines the same territory. It's a syncopated blues that examines the life of an aging alcoholic looking back on his life with a so much regret that he's immobilized. "The Bullet" is a macabre cowboy ballad that dances on the edge of the grave with a smirk on its face, dreaming of the bullet that will bring sweet relief. The one spark of light is "For My Family," a beautiful prayer for good times, full of compassion and love. The four bonus tracks on the reissue, all recorded around the same time as the album, are as good as the original tracks. "Nobody's Dirty Business" is a ragtime arrangement of a Mississippi John Hurt tune driven by Turino's forceful bass; "Dynamite" is a bad-man ballad full of the band's trademark dark humor; and two live tracks close the album -- "Ocean's Cold" is a celebration of debauchery with an unnamed drummer adding to its frenetic energy, while "Fun Has Just Begun" describes the blood and confusion of a battlefield with a chilling devil-may-care humor.

j. poet, Rovi

If You Leave

Daughter
Given its beginnings as Elena Tonra's solo project, it would be easy to assume that Daughter is just another singer/songwriter act with a couple of supporting musicians. However, over the course of If You Leave, Tonra, guitarist Igor Haefeli, and drummer Remi Aguilella make it clear that this is the work of a band. Together, they swing between moments of close-up intimacy and widescreen majesty, often during the course of one song. These songs have so many ebbs and flows that they're practically tidal: "Lifeforms" swells from spiraling guitars that recall the xx in their moody simplicity into towering rock that makes the most of Haefeli's amps and Aguilella's kit. That said, the most powerful part of Daughter's music is Tonra's lyrics, which are full of striking images that echo and intensify the music's mix of detail and drama. Heartbreak leaves physical destruction in its wake on "Youth," where the loveless are "setting fire to our insides for fun"; "Still" uses careful and clever parallel structures to track a relationship's decay, making a poignant contrast between when things were good and when they weren't. If You Leave's haunted, wounded, and weary songs aren't always the easiest listening; there's a fine line between brooding and moping, and while Daughter mostly stay on the right side of it, they wobble occasionally, to the point where the brisk acoustic guitars on "Human" feel like opening the windows in a stuffy room. Tonra's voice, which has just the right balance of warmth and ethereality, helps carry the album through its darkest moments and shines especially brightly on the closing track, "Shallows," a slow-building, seven-minute epic that earns its drama and shows what they can do with that kind of space. Even if their meditations on heartbreak and death can be overwhelming occasionally, If You Leave proves that Daughter can channel a single mood over the course of an entire album with often exquisite results.

Heather Phares, Rovi

Little Voice

Sara Bareilles
For her first major outing Little Voice, Sara Bareilles puts forth an intimate, emotionally charged album that sounds remarkably polished for a fledgling self-taught songwriter/performer. In fact, her voice even stands up to professionally trained pop divas like Christina Aguilera. Her only potential downfall is that she fits so perfectly in the adult contemporary female pianist mold that comparisons are inevitable -- Bareilles' vocal range is similar to Fiona Apple and she bears a striking physical resemblance to a merged composite of Vanessa Carlton and Michelle Branch. Despite the plethora of comparable looking and sounding artists, she still manages to stand out. The songs are sultry and generally upbeat, and delivered in a soulful manner with polished production and arrangement, but her X factor is in her ability to make it all sound unforced and very, very easy. Unquestionably, she's a natural with a huge voice and personality that shine through with spirited energy here. Perhaps the best and most original track is the ultra-peppy (think "Benny and the Jets") "Love on the Rocks" (not to be confused with the Neil Diamond number). With a warm wah-wah guitar and meandering Motown-esque harmonies, it makes for a perfect summertime love song. Undoubtedly her expertise is writing love songs like this, evident by song titles like "Love Song" and "One Sweet Love," but there are enough uniquely spun takes on the subject to make it interesting. In "Fairytale," children's stories are used as a metaphor for escapism and dealing with depression, and with the moody ballad "Gravity," falling in love is compared to getting caught in an inescapable gravitational pull. In the latter tearjerker of a tune, she shows off her chops with a song-stopping vocal crescendo, further proving that she has a style that's something special, even among all the stiff competition.

Jason Lymangrover, Rovi

The Big Lebowski

Soundtrack
The soundtrack to The Big Lebowski, the Coen brothers' follow-up to their breakthrough film Fargo, is an odd mixture of opera, world music, pop, jazz, exotica, folk and blues. In other words, it's as idiosyncratic as the Coens themselves, and the weird array of styles makes sense in practice, not on paper. Among the highlights are Elvis Costello's "My Mood Swings," Bob Dylan's "The Man in Me," Nina Simone's "I Got It Bad and That Ain't Good," Yma Sumac's "Ataypura," Kenny Rogers' "Just Dropped In," Townes Van Zandt's "Dead Flowers" and Henry Mancini's "Lujon." The collection makes more sense if you've seen the film, but there are enough good songs and quirky humor to make it an enjoyable listen on its own terms.

Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Glass Houses

Billy Joel
The back-to-back success of The Stranger and 52nd Street may have brought Billy Joel fame and fortune, even a certain amount of self-satisfaction, but it didn't bring him critical respect, and it didn't dull his anger. If anything, being classified as a mainstream rocker -- a soft rocker -- infuriated him, especially since a generation of punks and new wave kids were getting the praise that eluded him. He didn't take this lying down -- he recorded Glass Houses. Comparatively a harder-rocking album than either of its predecessors, with a distinctly bitter edge, Glass Houses still displays the hallmarks of Billy Joel the pop craftsman and Phil Ramone the world-class hitmaker. Even its hardest songs -- the terrifically paranoid "Sometimes a Fantasy," "Sleepin' With the Television On," "Close to the Borderline," the hit "You May Be Right" -- have bold, direct melodies and clean arrangements, ideal for radio play. Instead of turning out to be a fiery rebuttal to his detractors, the album is a remarkable catalog of contemporary pop styles, from McCartney-esque whimsy ("Don't Ask Me Why") and arena rock ("All for Leyna") to soft rock ("C'etait Toi [You Were the One]") and stylish new wave pop ("It's Still Rock and Roll to Me," which ironically is closer to new wave pop than rock). That's not a detriment; that's the album's strength. The Stranger and 52nd Street were fine albums in their own right, but it's nice to hear Joel scale back his showman tendencies and deliver a solid pop/rock record. It may not be punk -- then again, it may be his concept of punk -- but Glass Houses is the closest Joel ever got to a pure rock album.

Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Brave

Various
"Brave" drew attention for being Pixar's first film to feature a female protagonist, the headstrong, flame-haired Scottish princess Merida. However, as Brave's soundtrack reveals, the movie is also noteworthy for being one of the studio's most musical films, especially for one not featuring music by Pixar's go-to songwriter Randy Newman. Instead, Brave's songs make the most of the film's girl-power sentiments and Celtic setting with Patrick Doyle's lively score and songs performed by the cast, as well as Scottish folksinger Julie Fowlis and English singer/songwriter Birdy. Though Fowlis often sings in Scots Gaelic, she sounds just as soaring and sweet in English on "Touch the Sky" and "Into the Open Air"; likewise, Birdy -- accompanied by folk-rock sensations Mumford & Sons -- channels Merida's longing for freedom and wide-open spaces in "Learn Me Right." The princess' mom and dad get in on the act too, with Billy Connolly leading the cast through "Song of Mor'Du," a rousing song about a local monster, while Emma Thompson and Peigi Barker sing the lovely lullaby "Noble Maiden Fair (A Mhaighdean Bhan Uasal)." Meanwhile, Doyle's score embellishes its orchestral pieces with plenty of pipes, fiddles, and lilting melodies, particularly on "Fate and Destiny" and "Merida's Home," but also delivers some wonderfully cartoony moments with "The Games" and "Through the Castle," and downright tense cues such as "Merida Rides Away" and "Not Now!" Judged purely on its musical merits, Brave might not be the most memorable of Pixar soundtracks, but it maintains the studio's reputation for creative and fitting details in every part of its productions.

Heather Phares, Rovi

The Longing

All Sons & Daughters

Our Endless Numbered Days

Iron & Wine
On Our Endless Numbered Days, the follow-up to 2002's stunningly good Creek Drank the Cradle, the sound of Iron & Wine has changed but the song remains the same. No longer does Sam Beam record his intimate songs in the intimate surroundings of his home. Instead he has made the jump to the recording studio. As a result the record is much cleaner, less cocoon-like, certainly more the product of someone who has become a professional musician and not someone who just records for fun on a four-track. However, all Beam has sacrificed is sound quality. The sound of the record is still very intimate and simple, with very subtle arrangements that leave his voice and lyrics as the focal point. Luckily all the technology in the world can't affect Beam's voice, which still sounds like it comes right from his lips into your ear as if he were an angel perched on your shoulder. His songs are still as strong and memorable as they were on Creek, no drop off whatsoever in quality. "Naked as We Came" with sparkling melody lovely background harmonies by his sister Sara; the aching folk ballad "Radio War," which wouldn't sound out of place on Prairie Home Companion, only it would be the best thing you ever heard there; the sad and sweet "Each Coming Night"; the crystalline acoustic guitar ballad "Fever Dream," which has the kind of vocal harmony between Beam and his sister that seems to be the exclusive domain of siblings; and the soft rock CSNY "Sodom, South Georgia" are the equal of anything on Iron & Wine's debut and match up well with anything Palace, Smog, or their ilk have done lately. A definite plus to recording in a studio and enlisting the help of outside musicians is that there is much more variety to the album and there are lots of small production touches that liven things up like the Native American chants at the close of "Cinder and Smoke," the pedal steel guitar on "Sunset Soon Forgotten," and the drums and tambourine on the bluesy "Free Until They Cut Me Down." Our Endless Numbered Days is very subdued, thoughtful, melodic, and downright beautiful album and the new sound is more of a progression than a sudden shift in values, production or otherwise. Anyone who found the first album to be wonderful will no doubt feel the same about this one. Heck, you might even like it more. [A Japanese version included bonus tracks.]

Top Songs

Let Her Go

Passenger

human

christina perri

Brave

Sara Bareilles

A Thousand Years

Christina Perri

I Choose You

Sara Bareilles

The A Team

Ed Sheeran

Home

Phillip Phillips

jar of hearts

Christina Perri

Lego House

Ed Sheeran

Wagon Wheel

Old Crow Medicine Show

Hallelujah

Rufus Wainwright

Skinny Love

Birdy

Dog Days Are Over

Florence & The Machine

Fast Car

Tracy Chapman

When You Say Nothing At All

Alison Krauss

Riptide

Vance Joy

Best I Ever Had

Gavin DeGraw

Upside Down

Jack Johnson

Into The Mystic

Van Morrison

Gravity

Sara Bareilles

The Times They Are a-Changin'

Bob Dylan

Medicine

Daughter

You Can Call Me Al

Paul Simon