New Releases

Atmosphere

Kaskade

Quack

Duck Sauce

It's Album Time

Todd Terje

Club in Hand

Riva Starr

The 8 Deadly Sins

Quentin Mosimann

Family Vacation

Axel Boman

1991

Hardkiss

Silent Fireworks

Dapayk & Padberg

Boxed Out

Detroit Swindle

We Got A Love

Shit Robot

Wide

Animal Trainer

Loving You (Remixes)

Matt Cardle

Drive

Gareth Emery

Electro Swing VI by Bart & Baker

Bart & Baker

Durban Blaze EP (Remixes)

Dog G

Durban Blaze

Dog G

Tritonia - Chapter 001

Tritonal

No Hay Manera de Olvidarte

DCS

King Of Pain

Mezo

Better Luck Next Time

Bombs Away

Top Albums

Settle

Disclosure

Get Wet

Krewella

Animals

Martin Garrix

Discovery

Daft Punk
Four long years after their debut, Homework, Daft Punk returned with a second full-length, also packed with excellent productions and many of the obligatory nods to the duo's favorite stylistic speed bumps of the 1970s and '80s. Discovery is by no means the same record, though. Deserting the shrieking acid house hysteria of their early work, the album moves in the same smooth filtered disco circles as the European dance smashes ("Music Sounds Better with You" and "Gym Tonic") that were co-produced by DP's Thomas Bangalter during the group's long interim. If Homework was Daft Punk's Chicago house record, this is definitely the New York garage edition, with co-productions and vocals from Romanthony and Todd Edwards, two of the brightest figures based in New Jersey's fertile garage scene. Also in common with classic East Coast dance and '80s R&B, Discovery surprisingly focuses on songwriting and concise productions, though the pair's visions of bucolic pop on "Digital Love" and "Something About Us" are delivered by an androgynous, vocoderized frontman singing trite (though rather endearing) love lyrics. "One More Time," the irresistible album opener and first single, takes Bangalter's "Music Sounds Better with You" as a blueprint, blending sampled horns with some retro bass thump and the gorgeous, extroverted vocals of Romanthony going round and round with apparently endless tweakings. Though "Aerodynamic" and "Superheroes" have a bit of the driving acid minimalism associated with Homework, here Daft Punk is more taken with the glammier, poppier sound of Eurodisco and late R&B. Abusing their pitch-bend and vocoder effects as though they were going out of style (about 15 years too late, come to think of it), the duo loops nearly everything they can get their sequencers on -- divas, vocoders, synth-guitars, electric piano -- and conjures a sound worthy of bygone electro-pop technicians from Giorgio Moroder to Todd Rundgren to Steve Miller. Daft Punk are such stellar, meticulous producers that they make "any" sound work, even superficially dated ones like spastic early-'80s electro/R&B ("Short Circuit") or faux-orchestral synthesizer baroque ("Veridis Quo"). The only crime here is burying the highlight of the entire LP near the end. "Face to Face," a track with garage wunderkind Todd Edwards, twists his trademarked split-second samples and fully fragmented vision of garage into a dance-pop hit that could've easily stormed the charts in 1987. Daft Punk even manage a sense of humor about their own work, closing with a ten-minute track aptly titled "Too Long."

John Bush, Rovi

Clarity

Zedd
In the span of a few years, Anton Zaslavski was inspired by Justice to make electronic dance music, reached out to Skrillex and remixed "Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites," became an in-demand producer of remixes and original material, and signed to mainstream label Interscope. His remixes for the Black Eyed Peas and Lady Gaga, combined with production for Justin Bieber's Believe and singles like "The Anthem," "Shave It," and "Spectrum," made the German musician, still in his early twenties, a rising star in EDM and pop. Zaslavski's rapid ascent says more about his talent and creativity than the lack of skill and imagination required to make dance music. He was the drummer in a metalcore band, but he has definitely found his calling here. Clarity's lone pre-Interscope track is "Shave It," retitled "Shave It Up," made more musical with an all-strings coda, and yet shortened to a brisk 3:11. The song's grand and extended conclusion makes an early-in-the-album statement, however ostentatious, that Zaslavski can compose circles around the majority of EDM producers and do so in a concise fashion. He also knows how to construct an album. This plays out like it was developed and arranged for the sake of repeated listening rather than a quick fix for listeners in need of a rush. That said, there are plenty of peak moments that reflect the immediacy and desperation of adolescent relationships, like the stadium-ready title song (featuring Louisa Rose Allen, aka Foxes) and the fully developed modern pop of "Spectrum" (fronted in a boyish, bright-eyed manner by Matthew Koma). The instrumentals tend to be relatively restrained, but most of them are more attractive than the songs featuring big-name vocalists Ryan Tedder and Ellie Goulding. Zaslavski's not quite in a field of his own yet. "Stache" shamelessly displays the producer's indebtedness to key Justice influence Daft Punk -- it might as well be subtitled "Aerodynamic 2K12" -- but he's getting there. Anyone who appreciates well-crafted dance-pop should probably keep up with him.

Haunted House

Knife Party

Until One

Swedish House Mafia

For Lack of a Better Name

deadmau5
With a boost from Pete Tong's radio show, wunderkind Deadmau5 (aka Joel Zimmerman) has made his presence felt in the progressive house scene. This 2009 mix album compiles previously released and unreleased tracks, sequenced and segued like one of Deadmau5's exciting live spots. The spare aggression of "FML" is a dramatic kickoff to a collection that demonstrates Zimmerman's skill in manipulating moods. A funereal organ theme runs through both the playful "Moar Ghosts n Stuff" and its powerful companion track, "Ghosts n Stuff" (featuring an angsty/sexy vocal from Pendulum's Rob Swire), exploring both ends of the life/death continuum, before sliding effortlessly into the celebratory "Hi Friend!" (featuring MC Flipside). "The 16th Hour" bubbles along on a manic riff -- compelling if not inventive -- until a quiet interlude prettily deconstructs and comments on the original motif. The gorgeous and restorative "Strobe" lets listeners/dancers down gently.

Paula Carino, Rovi

> album title goes here <

deadmau5
Having spent the year tearing up social media and gossip sites as much as he spent tearing up the dancefloor, masked EDM superstar Deadmau5 seemed close to becoming a "celebrity DJ" in 2012, quite the evolution considering how his rise to fame was homegrown and fan-driven. Following up two albums with equally shruggy titles -- 2008's Random Album Title and 2009's For Lack of a Better Name -- >Album Title Goes Here< surprisingly comes off as the most "whatevs" of the bunch, favoring slowly developing tracks with extended intros, and cruising along the spaceways at midtempo and with only the occasional thump. My Chemical Romance's Gerard Way may give "Professional Griefers" his full goth swagger and "The Veldt," with guest vocalist Chris James, may use Ray Bradbury as the inspiration for an eight-minute EDM suite, but these tracks aren't overly garish, slick, or busy, and it's only when Cypress Hill show up on the iffy wobbler "Failbait" that the album feels clumsy or Steve Aoki-sized. The most rewarding moments come from the more restrained cuts, as Imogen Heap yearns for the human touch during the quite beautiful electro-haiku called "Telemiscommunications," while the bright floor-filler "Channel 42," with fellow producer Wolfgang Gartner, is pure fun, giving electro a bit of dubstep's punch and layering the twerpy sequencer patterns like they're multiple kites twisting in the sky. The firm bassline of "Superliminal" is something to latch onto, and it's cute how "Closer" uses the "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" theme to launch a bubbly journey through disco space. Add it all up, and >Album Title Goes Here< doesn't come off as entitled, over the top, or celebified enough to get in the V.I.P. section. Flying in the face of his public persona, this is a sprawling (could be tighter) and humble (could be more persuasive) Deadmau5 album and one best suited for established fans.

David Jeffries, Rovi

Drive

Gareth Emery

18 Months

Calvin Harris
You've been listening to Calvin Harris for months now, whether you know it or not. The Scottish producer is the golden child behind such huge pop hits as Rihanna's "We Found Love" and Ne-Yo's "Let's Go." These tracks aren't even the standouts on Harris' third solo album, 18 Months, which spills over with big-name collaborations and singles that have been tearing up the clubs for the last few years. Songbirds Florence Welch, Ellie Goulding and Ayah Marar soar over Harris' sparkling electronic melodies, while British rappers Example, Dizzee Rascal and Tinie Tempah get drunk on his 100-proof kick drums and heavyweight drops. Kelis hops around a neon Nintendo dancefloor on "Bounce," while Harris himself vocally swaggers over the wistful rave rager "Feel So Close." Top this off with a few instrumental tracks that show off Harris' electro-house roots ("Mansion," "School") and 18 Months adds up to one of the most cohesive and listenable dance-pop records of the year.

Alive: 2007 (Live)

Daft Punk
Timed to perfection, Daft Punk's second live album landed exactly ten years after the first, and provides a fitting complement to Alive 1997, easily the best live non-DJ electronica record ever released. While the original featured only a handful of tracks (but found them transformed and tweaked "ad infinitum"), Alive 2007 is packed with productions, most of them short and many of them getting a big crowd response (all recorded at one show in Paris in June of 2007). As on their first two classic full-lengths, Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo display excellent crowd control, pacing the record well, spacing the hits, and building the mood like the good crowd-pleasers they are. (The visuals included in the regular and deluxe editions reveal quite the stage show as well.) It has the feel of a greatest-hits-live concert, but energized by Daft Punk's talents at weaving songs in and out of each other. Even songs from the comparatively desultory Human After All sound rejuvenated in context, with "Robot Rock" getting the show off to a rousing start. It may not be better or stronger than the original Alive 1997, but it's definitely harder and faster. [The deluxe edition of Alive 2007 included an enhanced CD with one ten-minute track that represented the encore plus a bonus video for "Harder Better Faster Stronger."]

Quack

Duck Sauce

More Monsters and Sprites

Skrillex

Until Now [Deluxe Version]

Swedish House Mafia
Until Now is the second mix album from Swedish DJ supergroup Swedish House Mafia. Featuring a mix of their own material - including the singles Greyhound, Save the World and Don’t You Worry Child - the album also includes exclusive Swedish House Mafia mash-ups of tracks by the likes of Steve Aoki, Coldplay, Florence + The Machine and Axwell., Rovi

Nothing But The Beat

David Guetta
French DJ David Guetta’s R&B-meets-house formula had topped the charts around the globe by the time his 2011 effort, Nothing But the Beat, saw release, so it shouldn’t be surprising that this star-studded collection of big-room tunes plays like a hits collection. His previous album, One Love, felt the same way, with every track a potential single, but the differences are in each album’s appropriate title. This one plays like "Now That’s What I Call Guetta 2", with Snoop Dogg acting as an avenging disco Doggfather on the Auto-Tuned “Sweat,” while Nicki Minaj does a pole dance on the operating table for “Turn Me On,” which turns a doctor visit into double entendre overflow. Jennifer Hudson guests on the cut “Night of Your Life,” making it the diva uplift track you’d expect from such a title, and Sia’s “Titanium” is a decent stab at Coldplay-for-the-house-music set. But something’s missing, something along the lines of “When Love Takes Over.” Without that soulful kind of anchor, Nothing But the Beat offers the same experience as one of Guetta’s numerous remix sets, which is a compliment if you’re a dancefloor and a caution if you’re a pair of headphones.

David Jeffries, Rovi

Atmosphere

Kaskade

F*** Me, I'm Famous 2013

David Guetta

Cross

JUSTICE
French boys Xavier de Rosnay and Gaspard Augé originally got their start in the music scene playing in bad Metallica and Nirvana cover bands, and the album art of Cross makes it look like a doomy metalcore release, but the record is anything but metal. In fact, it's almost everything but metal. It's a grimy mix of dancehall, techno, '80s R&B, and lounge with Clockwork Orange synths, deadly static crunches, hard-hitting kicks, grinding groans, and a spliced Off the Wall slap-popping bass. Scattered and chopped to all hell, the songs often feel revolutionary. This is partially due to the duo's "anything goes" attitude. It's as if Justice is reacting to complacency in latter-day electronic music and seeing how far they can take their slicing and dicing before the chopped up compositions fall apart. At certain moments, samples are dissected into such little snippets that it's hard to even decipher the instrument from the clicks and pops in-between the splices. Usually when the songs unravel to this point, they suddenly halt and get reeled back in to cohesion with the sudden snapback of a fishing lure that has been swept into the rapids. Instead of using their laptops to keep their beats tight and precise, Justice uses them to shake up their songs to such a gnarled, jittery point that they sometimes sound like mistakes. These happy accidents give the tunes a humanistic touch, like futuristic beats deconstructed by cavemen. While the instrumentals are often sinister and melancholy, as if they were concocted in a cold, cavernous atmosphere (which they were, in Rosnay's basement), the tracks with vocals are perfectly designed for a hot nightclub. "DVNO" has disco handclaps and bouncy vocals that could have been ripped from Oingo Boingo, "D.A.N.C.E." is tricked out with a Go! Team double-dutch flavor, and "Ththhee Ppaarrttyy" incorporates a cute-voiced rapper coaxing her friends to get "drunk and freaky fried" over a keyboard potentially lifted from Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. At the darker end of the dance spectrum, "Stress" is an exhausting exercise in patience with a teapot whistle screaming over a tension-building {*Space Invaders} type bassline, and "Waters of Nazareth" combines a crunchy church organ with a bottom-heavy synthesizer rolling in gravel. Admirably random samples dug up from underground sources like '70s Italian prog-rockers Goblin, combined with a reckless abandon and an adherence to melodic hooks, makes Cross one of the most interesting electro-crossovers since Ratatat, and the guys in Justice do an excellent job building on Daft Punk's innovative foundation.

Jason Lymangrover, Rovi

Homework

Daft Punk
Daft Punk's full-length debut is a funk-house hailstorm, giving real form to a style of straight-ahead dance music not attempted since the early fusion days of on-the-one funk and dance-party disco. Thick, rumbling bass, vocoders, choppy breaks and beats, and a certain brash naiveté permeate the record from start to finish, giving it the edge of an almost certain classic. While a few fall flat, the best tracks make this one essential.

Sean Cooper, Rovi

Apocalypse Soon

Major Lazer

Free The Universe (Extended Version)

Major Lazer
Free the Universe is the second studio album by the Diplo-fronted musical project Major Lazer. Following the departure of Switch, who contributed to first album Guns Don't Kill People... Lazers Do, Diplo enlisted the help of producers Jillionaire and Walshy Fire to create a lively record. Having a diverse range of guest collaborators (Ezra Koenig, Shaggy, Bruno Mars, and many more) gives the album a fresh and party feel.

It's Album Time

Todd Terje

DCONSTRUCTED

Various

Top Songs

Animals

Martin Garrix

Latch

Disclosure

Clarity

Zedd

Titanium (feat. Sia)

David Guetta

Sweet Nothing

Calvin Harris feat. Florence Welch

Cinema (Skrillex Remix)

Benny Benassi

Flower

Moby

You & Me (Flume Remix)

Disclosure

Spectrum

Zedd

Get Lucky (Radio Edit)

Daft Punk

Harder Better Faster Stronger

Daft Punk

Ghosts 'n' Stuff

deadmau5

Golden

Jill Scott

Original Don

Major Lazer

Shot Me Down (feat. Skylar Grey)

David Guetta

Live for the Night

Krewella

Moar Ghosts 'n' Stuff

deadmau5

Take Over Control (feat. Eva Simons)

Afrojack

Error 404 (Original Mix)

Martin Garrix

Enjoy the Ride

Krewella

Bigfoot (Original Mix)

W&W

Satisfaction

Benny Benassi