Star Trek (Remastered)

1966 • NBC
4.8
729 reviews
TV-PG
Rating
Eligible
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Season 2 episodes (26)

1 Amok Time
9/15/67
The classic tale of Spock's feverish Vulcan mating urge and mortal combat with Kirk features a host of new artwork for the Remastered edition that adds vistas of the hot planet never before seen on a television scale. The high-elevation nature of the pon farr ceremonial grounds echoes the landscapes of Vulcan of the later motion pictures, but only enhances the mood and the music of the classic tragic battle set up by Spock's manipulating childhood fiance, T'Pring. Sharp-eyed fans will note the distant views of Spock's hometown -- an homage to artwork later used in "Star Trek: Enterprise" -- and a new setting for T'Pring's girlhood photo.
2 Who Mourns for Adonais?
9/22/67
The Enterprise is held captive by the Greek god, Apollo.
3 The Changeling
9/29/67
The Enterprise encounters a probe named Nomad.
4 Mirror, Mirror
10/6/67
The Star Trek "mirror universe" conjures up images of Spock's goatee, the captain's woman and dress daggers -- but the Remastered edition adds a few more touches as well. The routine landing party beam-up is snagged by a new smeary ion storm effect for Kirk, Scotty, McCoy and Uhura's entry into the savage parallel universe. New visuals especially enhance the cruelty of this dimension, with the agonizer and the agony booth both getting a creepier, more visceral CGI treatment. The "mirror" Kirk finds he has a sexy "captain's woman" and a "Tantalus field," that ruthless secret death machine he can turn on anyone remotely -- but will he ever get his people back home?
5 The Apple
10/13/67
The crew discovers a paradise controlled by computer.
6 The Doomsday Machine
10/20/67
The Remastered edition brings an incredibly rich look to the biggest visual-effects episode of the original series, not only improving the visuals but clarifying the most active starship battle depicted in the 1960s. Investigating the loss of sister starship Constellation, the Enterprise stumbles across a huge alien superweapon that wrecked not only the lost ship but also entire planets in several solar systems -- and drove Commodore Matt Decker into a "Ahab complex" that threatens the Enterprise when he forcibly takes command. Now, see the sad wreckage of the Constellation in all-new detail, get a truer sense of scale with both starships, their shuttlecraft and the planet-killer, which gets an articulated treatment that truly enhances its robot-like mission of destruction. Remastered effects also let viewers truly see for the first time the choreography of the battle with each starship's strafing runs -- and there's even a new angle on the shuttlecraft departure.
7 Catspaw
10/27/67
Two alien scouts take form as a warlock and a witch/giant cat to oppose Kirk's crew, tapping into dark human icons that get the full Remastered treatment. Their landscape of Halloween and the paranormal now gets a full "dark castle" facade as well as clean-ups and tweaks everywhere. While struggling to discover the source of the pair's apparent transformational powers, Kirk wonders whether one alien's attraction to him is any more dangerous than the widening dispute between the two.
8 I, Mudd
11/3/67
The return of conman Harry Mudd is not a heavy tale of obvious visual effects, but the Remastered edition gives this romp a beautiful new version of a ringed world for Mudd's Planet. Among the 500 androids who turned on Mudd is leader Norman, the Enterprise hijacker, and here his "android circuitry" and belly hatch are another highlight of the Remastered redos. Mudd teams up with Kirk and even Spock and the staff, of course, for a wacky show of illogic -- their only available weapon for escape.
9 Metamorphosis
11/10/67
The shuttlecraft Galileo makes a forced landing on a world with a single human inhabitant.
10 Journey to Babel
11/17/67
One of Star Trek's classic tales sports our first look at Spock's parents, Andorians and Tellarites, Federation debate, terrorist raiders and covert assassins -- and the Remastered edition brings its special snap to all. With one envoy murdered and Spock's father Sarek the chief suspect until he has a heart attack, it takes a ruse by Kirk and McCoy to get the stubborn Spock into Sickbay to give blood for his father's surgery after Kirk is stabbed and unable to command. The Remastered version features an all-new detailed shuttlecraft landing in the hangar bay and the Orion spy ship, faithful to the original but finally seen in detail -- as well as the Enterprise phaser tracking system which tries to shoot it down.
11 Friday's Child
12/1/67
A simple mission to secure mining rights with the nomads of Capella IV turns upside down when Kirk's party learns a Klingon agent has beaten them to the punch and sponsors a coup that overthrows the old ruler. When his pregnant wife is set to die as well, Kirk kidnaps her against her will in their escape attempt, and he, Spock and McCoy stay on the run long enough for the Capellans to realize the Klingons' deceit and change course. The young son, born amid both danger and humor, is restored to the throne and gets a special name, thanks to the Enterprise officers.
12 The Deadly Years
12/8/67
Accelerated aging affects the senior officers and threatens Kirk's ability to lead.
13 Obsession
12/15/67
Kirk is determined to hunt down a vampiric entity he failed to destroy in his past.
14 Wolf In the Fold
12/22/67
The mood and atmosphere can only be enhanced by the Remastered process when shore leave on hospitable Argelius II turns deadly: Scotty's ladyfriend is found stabbed in an alley and he is found holding the knife over her. Incredibly, Spock's research, witnesses, and two more murdered women eventually point to the murderer as the entity behind the original serial killer, Earth's "Jack the Ripper." The new vibrant look of the Remastered treatment is at its best as always, but be sure to look for the lights of cities on the planet's dark side, matching how the live action of the story all takes place at night.
15 The Trouble With Tribbles
12/29/67
Partly inspired by the work of the 1996 Deep Space Nine homage episode, "Trials and Tribble-ations," this Remastered edition sports an all-new Klingon D-7 ship, the reworked Enterprise CGI model debut and close-up details of Space Station K-7 in this classic Star Trek comedy. Klingons, poisoned grain, a loud-mouth Federation bureaucrat and a mealy-mouthed trader -- and his fuzzy, faceless heroes the tribbles -- are here in all their crisp, clear Remastered glory.
16 The Gamesters of Triskelion
1/5/68
Three disembodied beings wager on fights staged by prisoners abducted from around the galaxy.
17 A Piece of the Action
1/12/68
Star Trek's other tongue-in-cheek romp gets a more realistic planet look from space in the Remastered edition, as Kirk attempts to undo the unintended contamination of Sigma Iotia II a century earlier yields a mobster-like culture like 1920s Chicago. It's a perfect example of the reason for the Prime Directive of non-interference, but Kirk, with an incredulous McCoy and "Spock-o" in tow, decides the best way to heal the damage is to play the part of mobsters themselves -- even if it means learning to drive a car. Along with its crisper, more colorful look overall, the Remastered edition also features a new treatment for the one time we see ship-fired phasers on stun.
18 The Immunity Syndrome
1/19/68
One of the most bizarre and colorful episodes of Season 2 is a showcase for the Remastered edition, with an all-new 3-D approach to the giant spacegoing amoeba that dominates the story. The lifeform is not sentient but still deadly on a mass scale, consuming the Gamma 7A system, the Vulcan-manned USS Intrepid and anything in its path while draining nearby power sources. The Remastered look now gives Enterprise a true "nighttime" treatment while within the "zone of darkness" around the amoeba, and both Spock's shuttlecraft suicide mission and the starship itself now seem truly trapped within the amoeba in a host of more complex and scaled environments.
19 A Private Little War
2/2/68
The Klingons provide arms to a peaceful planet and disrupt the balance of power.
20 Return to Tomorrow
2/9/68
Telepathic aliens take over Kirk and Spock's bodies.
21 Patterns of Force
2/16/68
The crisp Remastered treatment only heightens the irony and cruelty of an all-new Nazi world set up on Ekos, discovered by a shocked Enterprise crew sent to check on missing historian John Gill. Gill's misguided experiments have tragically gone wrong, and Kirk's group is finally rescued from capture and torture by contacts in the Ekosian underground.
22 By Any Other Name
2/23/68
Extra-galactic beings commandeer the Enterprise in an attempt to return home.
23 The Omega Glory
3/1/68
The Enterprise finds a planet devasted by disease that appears to treat the American flag with great reverence.
24 The Ultimate Computer
3/8/68
Enterprise is used to test the new M-5 computer.
25 Bread and Circuses
3/15/68
Spock and McCoy are forced to fight in Roman-like games.
26 Assignment: Earth
3/29/68
The Enterprise goes back in time and discovers a mysterious stranger trying to interfere with 20th-century events.

About this show

This classic science fiction series, set in the 23rd century, follows the voyages of the starship U.S.S. Enterprise as it explores the endless universe - seeking new life, new worlds, and new civilizations.
4.8
729 reviews
Kris Kris
August 26, 2020
All my things are not authorized in any way to people that are not good, including this comment to be read, used or in other ways. I love this series so much. One of my favorites. Good vs. evil is one of my favorites. Shore leave is pretty relaxing. Much better than Picard series in my personal views, as I couldn't stand Star Trek combined with thriller, it is of course comedy and love. Though I just plan to buy around 40% of shows of what I watch, this serie 100% must have in collections.
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Marc Elvy
February 9, 2015
These shows are comforting, familiar and enlightening. Yeah the acting is not always the greatest and the effects and sets are dated, but the stories and characters are epic, iconic. I see something new in the telling of the human story each time I watch each episode. Gene Roddenberry's vision of hope compels me to visit these old friends often.
7 people found this review helpful
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David Justice
November 28, 2015
60's Cheese sprinkled throughout and also some individual episodes were...just plain bad. Some episodes were great explorations of the human condition. Most were excellent TV-craft. The remastering is mostly replacing the space models and artwork with CGI models. It doesn't look foreign at all.
8 people found this review helpful
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