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 In January of 2016, Mike Brown, the discoverer of Sedna and other dwarf planets beyond Neptune and Pluto, made the stunning announcement that at least one full size planet (dubbed “Planet 9”) is still waiting to be detected in our outer solar system. Astronomers and Astrophysicists have embarked upon an intensive five-year program to scour the heavens in search of this missing corner piece to the solar system puzzle. 
In honor of that non-trivial pursuit, “A Twisted History: Genesis and the Cosmos” has been freshly edited and greatly expanded. It is not only a trusty bird dog to the epic scavenger hunt that is “Mission Planet 9,” but your companion in exploring the mysteries of the larger Milky Way Galaxy as well. 

The central figure of the Book of Genesis is not a mighty hunter (of men or beasts), but a mild-mannered cultivator of human relations and the celestial arts. It is not Nimrod, but Abraham who is reckoned as deserving of twelve entire chapters (Genesis 12 -23) and portions of two others (Genesis 24-25). He is curiously commanded to look toward the heavens and hunt for stars. In extra-Biblical tradition, Abraham is more specifically identified as the leading astronomer of his Age. With this in mind, an interpretation of the Torah from the perspective of Cosmology takes on renewed focus and significance, and especially in light of recent events. 

In the Book of Genesis, stargazer Abraham has a Nemesis named Abimelech. Adam is cursed with the company of an older, wiser and higher Serpent. Even more tellingly, Jacob (likened by his son Joseph to the Sun) wrestles with his slightly older, reddish and surly twin (Dwarf Sun) brother Esau. Twins are quite prominent and considered special in the Bible and Myth. Astrophysicists have also recently determined that multiple star systems predominate in our galactic neighborhood, and a number of young, developing star systems of this type are now being studied in detail. What we have not suspected is that our own solar system begun as a binary. In retrospect, it perhaps should have been intuitively obvious. There is two of everything! There are two gas giants, Jupiter and Saturn. There are two nearly identical other gas planets with extensive damage, Neptune and Uranus. There are two nearly identical rocky planets, Earth and Venus. There are two heavily damaged rocky planets, Mercury and Mars. There may even be the remains of two proto-planetary disks, those being the Oort Cloud and Kuiper Belt. How many more clues do we really need? 

Mike Brown and his colleagues are looking for a planet (and maybe two), but are more likely to rediscover our solar system’s missing stunted twin instead. Let’s just go ahead and dub it “Brown’s Dwarf.” 
The Shakespearean plays contain a stunning breadth and depth of knowledge about English history, European royal history, classical and contemporary literature, and about the complex relationships between the various royal courts of the day. Authorship by the Elizabethan Court is therefore discernible based on content alone, that is, by what the plays revealed and just as importantly, what they threatened to reveal about international royal affairs if the will of Elizabeth was not respected. One of the most significant (and surprising) functions of the plays was to act as a type of "Defense Program" for Queen Elizabeth's throne against her European rivals. However, the plays also served to instill solidarity in the members of the Elizabethan Court and to inspire the English people as well. The plays accomplished all of this without coming across as overly pedantic. They were not merely great works of literature, but a brilliant expression of Elizabethan foreign and domestic policy!

The story of Shakespeare turns out to be the story of Don Juan of Austria, from his princely legitimization as a boy; to liaisons with royals ladies from his teens; to being hailed at the age of 24 as “Savior of Europe” at the Battle of Lepanto (1571); to his suppression by jealous males of the Habsburg royal family (1578); and to his rehab by Queen Elizabeth under the English identity of George Carey. As George Carey, Don Juan had been present at the christening of his true son King James in Scotland (1566) and in command of the strategic Isle of Wight during the invasion of the Spanish Armada (1588). He was intimately involved in the founding of the Shakespeare Company both before and after becoming Queen Elizabeth’s “Lord Chamberlain.” The rise, fall and rising again of this international man of mystery was the central theme of the Shakespeare plays. He and Queen Elizabeth appear again and again in the plays, and under such character names as Claudio and Isabella in Measure for Measure; Claudio and Hero in Much Ado About Nothing; Claudius and Gertrude in Hamlet; Bassanio and Portia in The Merchant of Venice; Duke Theseus and Hippolyta in A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Petruchio and Kate in The Taming of the Shrew; and even Falstaff and Mistress Quickly of the Henry IV plays. Don Juan was the love of Queen Elizabeth’s life and she found a way to keep him near. Together they not only founded the Stuart Dynasty but became the progenitors of future generations of European royalty.

The Shakespearean plays contain a stunning breadth and depth of knowledge about English history, European royal history, classical and contemporary literature, and about the complex relationships between the various royal courts of the day. Authorship by the Elizabethan Court is therefore discernible based on content alone, that is, by what the plays revealed and just as importantly, what they threatened to reveal about international royal affairs if the will of Elizabeth was not respected. One of the most significant (and surprising) functions of the plays was to act as a type of "Defense Program" for Queen Elizabeth's throne against her European rivals. However, the plays also served to instill solidarity in the members of the Elizabethan Court and to inspire the English people as well. The plays accomplished all of this without coming across as overly pedantic. They were not merely great works of literature, but a brilliant expression of Elizabethan foreign and domestic policy!

The story of Shakespeare turns out to be the story of Don Juan of Austria, from his princely legitimization as a boy; to liaisons with royals ladies from his teens; to being hailed at the age of 24 as “Savior of Europe” at the Battle of Lepanto (1571); to his suppression by jealous males of the Habsburg royal family (1578); and to his rehab by Queen Elizabeth under the English identity of George Carey. As George Carey, Don Juan had been present at the christening of his true son King James in Scotland (1566) and in command of the strategic Isle of Wight during the invasion of the Spanish Armada (1588). He was intimately involved in the founding of the Shakespeare Company both before and after becoming Queen Elizabeth’s “Lord Chamberlain.” The rise, fall and rising again of this international man of mystery was the central theme of the Shakespeare plays. He and Queen Elizabeth appear again and again in the plays, and under such character names as Claudio and Isabella in Measure for Measure; Claudio and Hero in Much Ado About Nothing; Claudius and Gertrude in Hamlet; Bassanio and Portia in The Merchant of Venice; Duke Theseus and Hippolyta in A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Petruchio and Kate in The Taming of the Shrew; and even Falstaff and Mistress Quickly of the Henry IV plays. Don Juan was the love of Queen Elizabeth’s life and she found a way to keep him near. Together they not only founded the Stuart Dynasty but became the progenitors of future generations of European royalty.

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