From the renowned author of the New York Times best seller The Sibley Guide to Birds, a comprehensive, beautifully illustrated guide to identifying birds in the field--an essential companion for birders of all skill and experience levels.

The Sibley Guide to Birds and The Sibley Guide to Bird Life and Behavior are both universally acclaimed as the new standard source of species information. And now David Sibley, America’s premier birder and best-known bird artist, turns his attention to the general characteristics that influence the appearance of all birds, unlocking the clues to their identity.

In 200 beautifully rendered illustrations and 16 essays, this scientifically precise volume distills the essence of Sibley’s own experience and skills, providing a solid introduction to “naming” the birds. Birding Basics reviews how one can get started as a birder--the equipment necessary, where and when to go birding, and perhaps most important, the essential things to look for when birds appear in the field--as well as the basic concepts of bird identification and the variations that can change the appearance of a bird over time or in different settings. Sibley also provides critical information on the aspects of avian life that differ from species to species: feathers (color, arrangement, shape, molt), behavior and habitat, and sounds.

With Sibley as your guide, when you learn how to interpret what the feathers, the anatomical structure, the sounds of a bird tell you—when you know the clues that show you why there’s no such thing as “just a duck”—birding will be more fun, and more meaningful. An essential addition to the Sibley shelf!
An adaptation of the business classic Getting Things Done for teenage readers

The most interconnected generation in history is navigating unimaginable amounts of social pressure, both in personal and online interactions. Very little time, focus, or education is being spent teaching and coaching this generation how to navigate this unprecedented amount of "stuff" entering their lives each day. How do we help the overloaded and distracted next generation deal with increasing complexity and help them not only survive, but thrive? How do we help them experience stress-free productivity and gain momentum and confidence? How do we help them achieve autonomy, so that they can confidently take on whatever comes their way? 

Getting Things Done for Teens will train the next generation to overcome these obstacles and flourish by coaching them to use the internationally renowned Getting Things Done methodology. In its two editions, David Allen's classic has been translated into dozens of languages and sold over a million copies, establishing itself as one of the most influential business books of its era, and the ultimate book on personal organization. Getting Things Done for Teens will adapt its lessons by offering a fresh take on the GTD methodology, framing life as a game to play and GTD as the game pieces and strategies to play your most effective game. It presents GTD in a highly visual way and frames the methodology as not only as a system for being productive in school, but as a set of tools for everyday life. 

Getting Things Done for Teens is the how-to manual for the next generation--a strategic guidebook for creating the conditions for a fruitful and effective future.
This book was created to place side by side the ideas of researchers and practitioners concerned with organizational innovation. Included are 18 papers: (1) "Social Environments That Kill Creativity" (Teresa Amabile); (2) "High Creativity versus Low Creativity: What Makes the Difference?" (Teresa Amabile and Sharon Sensabaugh); (3) "Creativity and Leadership: Causal Convergence and Divergence" (Dean Keith Simonton); (4) "Adaptors and Innovators: Problem-solvers in Organizations" (M. J. Kirton); (5) "Climate for Creativity: What to Measure? What to Say About It?" (Nancy Koester and Robert Burnside); (6) "Innovation through Investment in People: The Consideration of Creative Styles" (Robert Rosenfeld); (7) "Creating Healthy Change" (Perry Buffington); (8) "Facilitating Creative Problem-solving Groups" (Scott Isaksen); (9) "Establishing a Corporate Environment for Stimulating Innovation" (K. Larry Hastie); (10) "Making Organizations Adaptive to Change: Eliminating Bureaucracy at Shenandoah Life" (John Myers); (11) "Structuring for Innovation...And the Bottom Line" (Robert Swiggett); (12) "Leading a Revolution in American Health Care" (Erie Chapman); (13) "Fostering Creativity and Innovation in a New-Product Research Group" (Richard Wright); (14) "Creative Problem Solving" (David Morrison); (15) "Delivering Managed Service" (Ron Zemke); (16) "Growing Up Creative in America" (Elizabeth Larsen); (17) "Visioning: Building Pictures of the Future" (Robert Burnside); and (18) "The Era of Multiple Transformations: Megatrends for Adults" (Michael Marien). (NB)
Because equity and instruction are inextricably bound

Why are equity visits such a critical first step to increasing opportunity and access for our under-served students? Because they take instructional rounds to a new level, providing a powerful lens for investigating the intersections of equity and instruction. After all, how can we possibly deliver equitable learning experiences, opportunities, and outcomes for our students, without first pinpointing problems of practice?

That’s where Equity Visits will prove absolutely indispensable to district and school administrators. It details how to combine a strong focus on instruction with explicit, intentional efforts to address systemic inequities. Inside you’ll find

A range of data collection activities and tools to target central issues of equity in your school Clear guidelines on how to investigate the ways instructional practices, structures, and beliefs lead to inequitable educational experiences—and how these are often masked in the day-to-day life of schools and districts A frank discussion of how to make race and racism an explicit part of investigating and addressing educational inequities Voices of school and district leaders who have taken crucial first steps to become “equity warriors” Recommendations on how to develop policies, initiatives, and practices to confront those inequities

Few dispute that instructional improvement must be a central focus of educational leadership, but for too long achieving educational equity has been absent from the conversation. Here is your opportunity to ensure equity occupy a central spot in data collection and analysis, and be explicitly discussed at all levels of your school or district organization. In short, essential reading and doing for all administrators!

An adaptation of the business classic Getting Things Done for teenage readers

The most interconnected generation in history is navigating unimaginable amounts of social pressure, both in personal and online interactions. Very little time, focus, or education is being spent teaching and coaching this generation how to navigate this unprecedented amount of "stuff" entering their lives each day. How do we help the overloaded and distracted next generation deal with increasing complexity and help them not only survive, but thrive? How do we help them experience stress-free productivity and gain momentum and confidence? How do we help them achieve autonomy, so that they can confidently take on whatever comes their way?

Getting Things Done for Teens will train the next generation to overcome these obstacles and flourish by coaching them to use the internationally renowned Getting Things Done methodology. In its two editions, David Allen's classic has been translated into dozens of languages and sold over a million copies, establishing itself as one of the most influential business books of its era, and the ultimate book on personal organization. Getting Things Done for Teens will adapt its lessons by offering a fresh take on the GTD methodology, framing life as a game to play and GTD as the game pieces and strategies to play your most effective game. It presents GTD in a highly visual way and frames the methodology as not only as a system for being productive in school, but as a set of tools for everyday life.

Getting Things Done for Teens is the how-to manual for the next generation--a strategic guidebook for creating the conditions for a fruitful and effective future.

Includes a bonus PDF with a visual Summary, Lab Experiments, and a Glossary. 
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