Drawing activities, art instruction, and advice for artists and non-artists alike.
     
Urban sketching--the process of drawing on the go as a regular practice--is a hot trend in the drawing world. It's also a practical necessity for creatively minded people in a busy world.  In this aspirational guide, self-taught French artist France Belleville-Van Stone emboldens readers to craft a ritual of their own and devote more time to art, even if it's just 10 minutes a day. She offers motivation to move beyond the comfort zone, as well as instruction on turning rough sketches into finished work. 

Belleville Van-Stone learned how to draw through her own daily practice and knows first-hand how hard it is to find time to incorporate creativity into a busy life. She encourages and teaches us how to do it with advice and guidance such as:

·         An A-to-Z list of daily sketch prompts, from airports to bananas, faces to hands, meetings and workplaces
·         Tips on what drawing supplies you can and should have--and how to carry them around
·         Sections on accepting mistakes, drawing with limited resources, and redefining completion
·         Plusses and minuses of going digital, including apps, styluses, and brushes

For those of us who dream of drawing in the minutes between school and work, bathtime and bedtime, and waking and walking out the door, the practical advice in Sketch! is a revelation. By sharing her own creative process, Belleville-Van Stone Sketch inspires artists both established and aspiring to rethink their daily practice, sketch for the pure joy of it, and document their lives and the world around them.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Edgar Award Finalist: The “exciting” true story of the abduction of biathlete Kari Swenson and the five-month manhunt to bring her tormentors to justice (The New York Times Book Review).

Former rodeo cowboy Johnny France had been sheriff of Madison County, Montana, for three years when Kari Swenson, a Bozeman resident training for the World Biathlon Championship, went missing near Big Sky Resort in July 1984. Her friends feared that Kari had been attacked by a grizzly bear, but the truth was far scarier: She’d been kidnapped at gunpoint by father-and-son survivalists Don and Dan Nichols. The pair had been living in the wilderness off and on for years and hoped to make Kari a “mountain woman” and Dan’s bride. But the plan went horribly wrong from the start, and after a deadly firefight with rescuers, the kidnappers vanished into the rugged terrain of the Spanish Peaks.
 
As Montana’s summer froze into brutal winter blizzards, SWAT teams, forest rangers, and antiterrorist units searched the backcountry but sighted the mountain men only once. Then came the call about a strange campfire on a slope above the Madison River. Sheriff France decided to go into the forest to face the fugitives—alone. The resulting showdown made him “perhaps the most famous Western sheriff since Wyatt Earp . . . a modern legend” (Chicago Tribune).
 
Incident at Big Sky is an “amazing . . . exciting retelling of a modern crime” that made headlines around the world (The New York Times Book Review). In a voice as distinctive and compelling as the Montana landscape, France takes readers on a high-stakes adventure so bizarre and unforgettable it could only be true.
The development of modern complex software-intensive systems often involves the use of multiple DSMLs that capture different system aspects. Supporting coordinated use of DSMLs leads to what we call the globalization of modeling languages, that is, the use of multiple modeling languages to support coordinated development of diverse aspects of a system.

In this book, a number of articles describe the vision and the way globalized DSMLs currently assist integrated DSML support teams working on systems that span many domains and concerns to determine how their work on a particular aspect influences work on other aspects.

Globalized DSMLs offer support for communicating relevant information, and for coordinating development activities and associated technologies within and across teams, in addition to providing support for imposing control over development artifacts produced by multiple teams.

DSMLs can be used to support socio-technical coordination by providing the means for stakeholders to bridge the gap between how they perceive a problem and its solution, and the programming technologies used to implement a solution. They also support coordination of work across multiple teams. DSMLs developed in an independent manner to meet the specific needs of domain experts have an associated framework that regulates interactions needed to support collaboration and work coordination across different system domains.

The articles in the book describe how multiple heterogeneous modeling languages (or DSMLs) can be related to determine how different aspects of a system influence each other. The book includes a research roadmap that broadens the current DSML research focus beyond the development of independent DSMLs to one that provides support for globalized DSMLs.

If building relationships and encouraging productive change are enterprises you wish to learn, this book is for you. In this new edition, previously titled SUPPORTIVE INTERVIEWING IN HUMAN SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS, all of the material has been updated with regard to supporting research. The basic system that is presented is simple and straightforward, enabling the reader to keep in mind the fundamental concepts and allowing for the freedom to be flexible, spontaneous, creative, and natural. To increase the reader's understanding, the chapters have been arranged in the following order: Chapter 1 discusses several basic issues regarding the development and use of helping skills. Chapter 2 explores common modes of response. In Chapter 3, several ingredients are provided that foster positive relationships. Chapter 4 presents a step-by-step approach to problem solving. Chapter 5 examines responses that can detract from your efforts. In Chapter 6, a straightforward approach is presented to establishing goals, objectives, and plans. Chapter 7 describes channels of nonverbal information and commonly encountered nonverbal messages. Chapter 8 highlights endeavors that take center stage before, during, and after scheduled appointments. And Chapter 9 considers the needs of several groups: children, older persons, clients having low socioeconomic status, psychotic individuals, and persons experiencing long-standing issues. It will be appropriate for use by human service workers such as social workers, nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists, psychotherapists, counselors and others. Performance in any of these arenas, and a host of others, can be enhanced by the communication skills taught in this book.

A New York Times 2016 Notable Book

The definitive history of the successful battle to halt the AIDS epidemic—from the creator of, and inspired by, the seminal documentary How to Survive a Plague.

A riveting, powerful telling of the story of the grassroots movement of activists, many of them in a life-or-death struggle, who seized upon scientific research to help develop the drugs that turned HIV from a mostly fatal infection to a manageable disease. Ignored by public officials, religious leaders, and the nation at large, and confronted with shame and hatred, this small group of men and women chose to fight for their right to live by educating themselves and demanding to become full partners in the race for effective treatments. Around the globe, 16 million people are alive today thanks to their efforts.

Not since the publication of Randy Shilts’s classic And the Band Played On has a book measured the AIDS plague in such brutally human, intimate, and soaring terms.

In dramatic fashion, we witness the founding of ACT UP and TAG (Treatment Action Group), and the rise of an underground drug market in opposition to the prohibitively expensive (and sometimes toxic) AZT. We watch as these activists learn to become their own researchers, lobbyists, drug smugglers, and clinicians, establishing their own newspapers, research journals, and laboratories, and as they go on to force reform in the nation’s disease-fighting agencies.

With his unparalleled access to this community David France illuminates the lives of extraordinary characters, including the closeted Wall Street trader-turned-activist, the high school dropout who found purpose battling pharmaceutical giants in New York, the South African physician who helped establish the first officially recognized buyers’ club at the height of the epidemic, and the public relations executive fighting to save his own life for the sake of his young daughter.

Expansive yet richly detailed, this is an insider’s account of a pivotal moment in the history of American civil rights. Powerful, heart-wrenching, and finally exhilarating, How to Survive a Plague is destined to become an essential part of the literature of AIDS.
Marqué par la guerre et les totalitarismes, le XXe siècle produit une littérature entièrement à réinventer, traversée par des courants aussi nombreux que spectaculaires. Cette collection de citations présente la pensée de cinq auteurs incontournables du XXe siècle sous forme concise, accessible et pratique. C'est en 1907 que Marcel Proust commence l'écriture de son chef d'œuvre À la recherche du temps perdu dont les sept tomes sont publiés entre 1913 (Du côté de chez Swann) et 1927, c'est-à-dire en partie après sa mort ; son oeuvre est une réflexion majeure sur le temps et la mémoire affective, l'amour et la jalousie, et les fonctions de l'art qui doit proposer ses propres mondes. Jules Renard a connu le succès avec L'Écornifleur, publié en 1892, qui raconte l'histoire d'un littérateur parasite, puis Poil de Carotte ; son Journal est un témoignage précieux sur la vie littéraire de la Belle Époque. Anatole France est un des plus grands écrivains de l'époque de la Troisième République, dont il a également été un des plus importants critiques littéraires. Les essais de Paul Valéry traduisent ses inquiétudes sur la pérennité de la civilisation, l'avenir des « droits de l'esprit », le rôle de la littérature dans la formation, et la rétroaction du progrès sur l'homme. Jean Giraudoux a participé comme d'autres dramaturges des années 1930-1940 (Cocteau, Anouilh, Sartre, Camus par exemple) à la réécriture des mythes antiques éclairés par les mentalités modernes. Il a su allier fantaisie poétique et goût pour les images insolites, et également associer tragique et léger. La pensée de chaque auteur est résumée en 100 citations marquantes et essentielles, faciles à mémoriser et à s'approprier ; ce format concis et accessible est idéal pour la préparation aux examens et aux concours (bac, capes, agrégation...), la culture générale et le développement personnel.
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