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The contents of the May 2018 issue (Number 7) include: 
• Article, "Music as a Matter of Law," by Joseph P. Fishman  
• Article, "The Morality of Administrative Law," by Cass R. Sunstein & Adrian Vermeule  
• Book Review, "The Black Police: Policing Our Own," by Devon W. Carbado & L. Song Richardson 
• Note, "Section 230 as First Amendment Rule" 
In addition, the issue features extensive student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as: a recent ruling that bystanders have a First Amendment right to record police but granting qualified immunity to police officers involved; whether a local (Massachusetts) drone ordinance is preempted by an FAA regulation; whether there is irreparable injury from a state's (Alabama's) lack of notice to people with felony convictions upon their re-enfranchisement; whether a state law (from South Dakota) is unconstitutional in requiring internet retailers without a physical presence in the state to remit sales tax (an issue currently before the U.S. Supreme Court); estate planning and digital inheritance, and whether personal representatives may provide lawful consent for the release of a decedent's emails; and finally whether a district court may use the policy of public understanding of the opioid epidemic to deny a plea bargain.  The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper eBook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is May 2018, the 7th issue of academic year 2017-2018 (Volume 131). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2400 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.
The Harvard Law Review, April 2015, is offered in a digital edition. Contents include the annual Developments in the Law survey of a particular area of legal concern; this year's topic is Policing. Other contents include: 

• Article, "Consent Procedures and American Federalism," by Bridget Fahey      

• Essay, "Anticipatory Remedies for Takings," by Thomas W. Merrill   

• Book Review, "How a 'Lawless' China Made Modern America: An Epic Told in Orientalism," by Carol G.S. Tan 

Specific subjects studied in Developments in the Law—Policing are: Policing and Profit, Policing Students, Policing Immigrant Communities, and Considering Police Body Cameras. 

In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as: the business judgment rule and mergers; whistleblowing under Dodd-Frank and extraterritoriality; senate redistricting in New York; postmortem rights of publicity; standing and overlap of various tests used; informing one who pleads No Contest of collateral consequences; exceptions to New York marriage license requirement for out-of-state marriages; exclusionary rule for violations of Posse Comitatus restrictions; and extending federal forced labor statute to conduct criminalized under state law. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. The Review comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. The organization is formally independent of the Harvard Law School. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This issue of the Review is Apr. 2015, the 6th issue of academic year 2014-2015 (Volume 128). The digital edition features active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. 

Contents of Harvard Law Review: Volume 130, Number 8 - June 2017 include:

* Article, "The Judicial Presumption of Police Expertise," by Anna Lvovsky  

* Essay, "The Debate That Never Was," by Nicos Stavropoulos  

* Essay, "Hart's Posthumous Reply," by Ronald Dworkin 

* Book Review, "Cooperative and Uncooperative Foreign Affairs Federalism," by Jean Galbraith  

* Note, "Rethinking Actual Causation in Tort Law"  

* Note, "The Justiciability of Servicemember Suits" 

* Note, "The Substantive Waiver Doctrine in Employment Arbitration Law" 

Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on: requiring proof of administrative feasibility to satisfy class action Rule 23; whether prison gerrymandering violates the Equal Protection Clause; justiciability of suit against the government for military sexual assaults; whether criminal procedure requires retroactive application of Hurst v. Florida to pre-Ring cases; whether statutory interpretation's rule of lenity requires fixing cocaine possession penalties by total drug weight; and, in international law, the UN's Security Council asserting Israel's settlement activities to be illegal. Finally, the issue includes several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2300 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the final issue of academic year 2016-2017.

The Harvard Law Review's March 2017 issue, Number 5, features these contents: 

• Article, "On the Relevance of Market Power," by Louis Kaplow 

• Book Review, "Spiraling: Evictions and Other Causes and Consequences of Housing Instability," by Vicki Been and Leila Bozorg (reviewing Matthew Desmond's Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

• Note, "Rights in Flux: Nonconsequentialism, Consequentialism, and the Judicial Role" 

• Note, "The Misguided Appeal of a Minimally Adequate Education" 
Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on: separation of powers and the appointments clause; personal jurisdiction in anti-terrorism act cases arising on foreign soil; deference to agency interpretations in conflict with circuit precedent; judicial review of zoning in light of DC's comprehensive plan; use of algorithmic risk assessments in sentencing; whether mother's debt for juvenile-detention costs of minor is dischargeable in bankruptcy; and whether ERISA preempt Michigan's Medicaid tax law. Finally, the issue includes two summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the fifth issue of academic year 2016-2017.

The November issue of the Harvard Law Review is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court's previous Term. Each year, the issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2014 Term, articles include: 

• Foreword: “Does the Constitution Mean What It Says?," by David A. Strauss  

• Comment: “Imperfect Statutes, Imperfect Courts: Understanding Congress’s Plan in the Era of Unorthodox Lawmaking,” by Abbe R. Gluck 

• Comment: “Zivotofsky II as Precedent in the Executive Branch,” by Jack Goldsmith  

• Comment: “A New Birth of Freedom?: Obergefell v. Hodges,” by Kenji Yoshino  

In addition, the first issue of each new volume provides an extensive summary of the important cases of the previous Supreme Court docket, covering a wide range of legal, political, and constitutional subjects. Student commentary on Leading Cases of the 2014 Term includes recent cases on: private rights of action and Medicaid; government speech under the First Amendment; judicial campaign speech; Fourth Amendment standing; reasonable mistakes of law for searches and seizure; regulatory takings under the Fifth Amendment; preliminary injunctions in death penalty cases; separation of powers in bankruptcy jurisdiction; legislative control of redistricting; racial gerrymandering under the Fourteenth Amendment; dormant commerce clause and personal income tax; changing interpretive rules in administrative law; residual clause of the Armed Career Criminal Act; cost-benefit analysis under the Clean Air Act; mens rea for violating federal threats law; disparate impact and racial equality in fair housing law; nondelegation doctrine in the context of railroad-passenger law; religious liberty and land use; Sherman Act state action immunity; and destruction of evidence under Sarbanes-Oxley. 

Complete statistical graphs and tables of the Court's actions and results during the Term are included; these summaries and statistics, including voting patterns of individual justices, have been considered very useful to scholars of the Court in law and political science. The issue includes a linked Table of Cases and citations for the opinions. Finally, the issue features two summaries of Recent Publications.

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is November 2015, the first issue of academic year 2015-2016 (Volume 129).

The Harvard Law Review's December 2016 issue, Number 2, features these contents: 

• Article, "Constitutionally Forbidden Legislative Intent," by Richard H. Fallon, Jr. 

• Article, "Deal Process Design in Management Buyouts," by Guhan Subramanian 

• Book Review, "Law and Moral Dilemmas," by Bert I. Huang    

• Note, "Charming Betsy and the Intellectual Property Provisions of Trade Agreements" 

• Note, "Political Questions, Public Rights, and Sovereign Immunity"  

Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on equitable relief from a foreign judgment under RICO, mootness after a 2014 Missouri election, compelling an Internet Service Provider to produce data stored overseas, immunity for failure-to-warn claims under the Communications Decency Act, whether the federal cannabis prohibition is a "substantial burden" under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, reasonableness of sentencing under the Guidelines after using a jury poll, and whether two-way video testimony violates the Confrontation Clause of the U.S. Constitution's Sixth Amendment. Finally, the issue includes several brief comments on Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the second issue of academic year 2016-2017.  

Harvard Law Review, Number 8 (June 2014), includes an extensive Symposium on Freedom of the Press, as well as an article, "The Criminal Court Audience in a Post-Trial World," by Jocelyn Simonson, and a book review essay, "The Positive Foundations of Formalism: False Necessity and American Legal Realism," by Lawrence B. Solum.  

Specifically, the Symposium on press freedoms features:

* "Introduction: Reflections on the First Amendment and the Information Economy," by Mark Tushnet
* "The 'New' New York Times: Free Speech Lawyering in the Age of Google and Twitter," by Marvin Ammori
* "Old-School/New-School Speech Regulation," by Jack M. Balkin
* "First Amendment Common Sense," by Susan Crawford
* "More than a Feeling: Emotion and the First Amendment," by Rebecca Tushnet
* "Press Exceptionalism," by Sonja R. West 

The issue includes these student contributions: 

* Note, "Congressional Control of Foreign Assistance to Post-Coup States"
* Note, "A Bad Man Is Hard to Find"
* Note, "Mediation of Investor-State Conflicts" 

In addition, case notes explore Recent Cases on such subjects as the FCC power to create Open Internet rules; whether enforcement of a foreign judgment is state action; and threat convictions in internet free speech cases; as well as Recent Legislation on immigration law and local entity compliance in California. The issue includes several Recent Publications summaries. Finally, as the final issue of volume 127, it contains a comprehensive Index of each article, essay, book review, and student work from the year. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked notes, active URLs in notes, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. The organization is formally independent of the Harvard Law School. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. 

The Harvard Law Review's May 2017 issue, Number 7, features these contents: 

• Article, "A Contextual Approach to Harmless Error Review," by Justin Murray  

• Book Review, "Courting Abolition," by Deborah W. Denno 

• Book Review, "This Land Is My Land?" by Tracey Meares 

• Note, "Clarifying Kiobel's 'Touch and Concern' Test"  

• Note, "If These Walls Could Talk: The Smart Home and the Fourth Amendment Limits of the Third Party Doctrine"  

Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on: trademark law and applying the Lanham Act to wholly foreign sales; election law and the test for partisan gerrymandering; civil procedure and whether service of process may be accomplished internationally via Twitter; felon disenfranchisement and the governor's clemency power; international law and sentencing for war crime of attacking cultural heritage; and international arbitration and whether Uruguay's anti-tobacco regulations violate Philip Morris's investment rights. Finally, the issue includes two summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the seventh issue of academic year 2016-2017. 

The November issue is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court's previous Term. The issue also includes an In Memoriam section honoring the memory of Justice Antonin Scalia. Contributors include Chief Justice John Roberts, Jr. and Associate Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan, as well as Cass Sunstein, Martha Minow, John Manning, and Rachel Barkow. 

Each year, the Supreme Court issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2015 Term, articles and essays include:  

• Foreword: “Looking for Power in Public Law,” by Daryl J. Levinson 

• Essay: “The Age of Scalia,” by Jamal Greene 

• Comment: “Fisher’s Cautionary Tale and the Urgent Need for Equal Access to an Excellent Education,” by Kimberly Jenkins Robinson    

• Comment: “Gridlock,” by Josh Blackman   

In addition, the first issue of each new volume provides an extensive summary of the important cases of the previous Supreme Court docket, covering a wide range of legal, political, and constitutional subjects. Student commentary is thus provided on Leading Cases of the 2015 Term, including such subjects as separation of powers, freedom of speech, exclusionary rule, right to counsel, equal protection, jurisdiction, mandatory arbitration, abortion rights, corruption statutes, immigration law, and Title VII. Complete statistical graphs and tables of the Court's actions and results during the Term are included; these summaries and statistics, including voting patterns of individual Justices, have long been considered very useful to scholars of the Court in law and political science. The issue includes a linked Index of Cases and citations for the discussed opinions. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is November 2016, the first issue of academic year 2016-2017 (Volume 130). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. 

The November issue is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court's previous Term. Each year, the issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2012 Term, articles and essays include:

• Foreword: "Equality Divided," by Reva B. Siegel
• Comment: "Beyond the Discrimination Model on Voting," by Samuel Issacharoff 
• Comment: "Windsor and Brown: Marriage Equality and Racial Equality," by Michael J. Klarman  
• Comment: "License, Registration, Cheek Swab: DNA Testing and the Divided Court," by Erin Murphy 

The issue also features essays on substantive and procedural law, and judicial method, honoring Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her 20 years on the Court. The essays are written by such scholars as Deborah Anker, Susan Farbstein, Judge Nancy Gertner, Lani Guinier, Vicki Jackson, Richard Lazarus, John Manning, Martha Minow, Carol Steiker, Julie Suk, Laurence Tribe, and Mark Tushnet. 

In addition, the first issue of each new volume provides an extensive summary of the important cases of the previous Supreme Court docket, covering a wide range of legal, political and constitutional subjects. Student commentary on Leading Cases of the 2012 Term includes recent cases on: federal preemption regarding elections; the Privileges and Immunities Clause; unconstitutional conditions violating free speech; effective assistance of counsel; dog-sniffing at the doorstep under the Fourth Amendment; jury trial right for mandatory sentencing; affirmative action in public universities; class action certification in securities cases; class action waivers in arbitration clauses; plain error review when new law is made after appeal; standing in government surveillance challenges; extraterritoriality under the Alien Tort Statute; actual innocence under AEDPA; deference to agencies in clean water and communication act cases; the First Sale Doctrine in copyright law; patent exhaustion; patentable subject matter; reverse payment settlements; Indian adoptions; and employer liability for supervisor harassment under Title VII. Complete statistical graphs and tables of the Court's actions and results during the Term are included. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications.

The February 2017 issue, Number 4, features these contents: 

• Article, William Baude & Stephen E. Sachs, "The Law of Interpretation" 

• Book Review, Kathryn Judge, "The Importance of 'Money'"      

• Note, "Cashing Out a Special Relationship?: Trends Toward Reconciliation Between Financial Regulation and Administrative Law" 

• Note, "Restoring Legitimacy: The Grand Jury as the Prosecutor's Administrative Agency" 

• Note, "The Rise of Purposivism and Fall of Chevron: Major Statutory Cases in the Supreme Court" 

Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on: abstaining from adjudicating habeas petition of Guantanamo detainee tried by military commission; a Second Circuit ruling that the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act, but not the FSIA, allows recovery against U.S. companies owned by state sponsors of terrorism; whether using another employee's password falls under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act; and whether government acquisition of historical cell-site location information is a Fourth Amendment search. Two Recent Adjudications are examined, one in which the NLRB ruled that student assistants at private colleges and universities are statutory employees covered by the NLRA, the other under Dodd-Frank, in which the FSOC determined that a General Electric subsidiary is no longer a "systemically important financial institution." Finally, the issue includes several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the fourth issue of academic year 2016-2017.  

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