The later novels of Machado de Assis -- notably Dom Casmurro and Esau and Jacob -- are well known in this country, but the earlier novels have never been translated. Here, in The Hand and the Glove (the Brazilian master's second novel), rendered in English for the first time by Albert I. Bagby, Jr., readers will find a younger, gentler Assis, writing a romantic comedy that is yet permeated with the lively wit characteristic of his later works.

The story is a simple one-of love lost and love found. Of love lost by Estêvão, amiable but vacillating, who is bemused by his own romantic posturing, and by Jorge, superficial and calculating. Of love found by Luis Alves, whose self-possession and determination seem destined to carry him far. The love of all three men is the proud and beautiful Guiomar, sure of her own heart but unsure, until faced by rival claims, of where to bestow it -- a foreshadowing of Capitú, the intriguing heroine of Dom Casmurro.

"English-speaking readers," says Helen Caldwell in the Foreword, "who are already acquainted with Machado de Assis will welcome this latest addition to the translated novels. True, it is a period piece; but its quaintness is a charm to carry us back to the Rio de Janeiro of the 1850s -- to vanished courtly elegance arid attitudes.... Now, we too can know what drew [Assis] back to this early tale, for The Hand and the Glove recreates in English the elegant background, the charming heroine, the comedy, and the light-hearted ebullience of the Portuguese original."

"A palm tree, seeing me troubled and divining the cause, murmured in its branches that there was nothing wrong with fifteen-year old boys getting into corners with girls of fourteen; quite the contrary, youths of that age have no other function, and corners were made for that very purpose. It was an old palm-tree, and I believed in old palm-trees even more than in old books. Birds, butterflies, a cricket trying out its summer song, all the living things of the air were of the same opinion." So begins this extraordinary love story between Bento and Capitu, childhood sweethearts who grow up next door to each other in Rio de Janeiro in the 1850s. Like other great nineteenth century novels--The Scarlet Letter, Anna Karenina, Madame Bovary--Machado de Assis's Dom Casmurro explores the themes of marriage and adultery. But what distinguishes Machado's novel from the realism of its contemporaries, and what makes it such a delightful discovery for English-speaking readers, is its eccentric and wildly unpredictable narrative style. Far from creating the illusion of an orderly fictional "reality," Dom Casmurro is told by a narrator who is disruptively self-conscious, deeply subjective, and prone to all manner of marvelous digression. As he recounts the events of his life from the vantage of a lonely old age, Bento continually interrupts his story to reflect on the writing of it: he examines the aptness of an image or analogy, considers cutting out certain scenes before taking the manuscript to the printer, and engages in a running, and often hilarious, dialogue with the reader. "If all this seems a little emphatic, irritating reader," he says, "it's because you have never combed a girl's hair, you've never put your adolescent hands on the young head of a nymph..." But the novel is more than a performance of stylistic acrobatics. It is an ironic critique of Catholicism, in which God appears as a kind of divine accountant whose ledgers may be balanced in devious as well as pious ways. It is also a story about love and its obstacles, about deception and self-deception, and about the failure of memory to make life's beginning fit neatly into its end. First published in 1900, Dom Casmurro is one of the great unrecognized classics of the turn of the century by one of Brazil's greatest writers. The popularity of Machado de Assis in Latin America has never been in doubt and now, with the acclaim of such critics and writers as Susan Sontag, John Barth, and Tony Tanner, his work is finally receiving the worldwide attention it deserves. Newly translated and edited by John Gledson, with an afterword by Joao Adolfo Hansen, this Library of Latin America edition is the only complete, unabridged, and annotated translation of the novel available. It offers English-speaking readers a literary genius of the rarest kind.
New York Times Critics’ Best of the Year

A landmark event, the complete stories of Machado de Assis finally appear in English for the first time in this extraordinary new translation.

Widely acclaimed as the progenitor of twentieth-century Latin American fiction, Machado de Assis (1839–1908)—the son of a mulatto father and a washerwoman, and the grandson of freed slaves—was hailed in his lifetime as Brazil’s greatest writer. His prodigious output of novels, plays, and stories rivaled contemporaries like Chekhov, Flaubert, and Maupassant, but, shockingly, he was barely translated into English until 1963 and still lacks proper recognition today. Drawn to the master’s psychologically probing tales of fin-de-siecle Rio de Janeiro, a world populated with dissolute plutocrats, grasping parvenus, and struggling spinsters, acclaimed translators Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson have now combined Machado’s seven short-story collections into one volume, featuring seventy-six stories, a dozen appearing in English for the first time.

Born in the outskirts of Rio, Machado displayed a precocious interest in books and languages and, despite his impoverished background, miraculously became a well-known intellectual figure in Brazil’s capital by his early twenties. His daring narrative techniques and coolly ironic voice resemble those of Thomas Hardy and Henry James, but more than either of these writers, Machado engages in an open playfulness with his reader—as when his narrator toys with readers’ expectations of what makes a female heroine in “Miss Dollar,” or questions the sincerity of a slave’s concern for his dying master in “The Tale of the Cabriolet.”

Predominantly set in the late nineteenth-century aspiring world of Rio de Janeiro—a city in the midst of an intense transformation from colonial backwater to imperial metropolis—the postcolonial realism of Machado’s stories anticipates a dominant theme of twentieth-century literature. Readers witness the bourgeoisie of Rio both at play, and, occasionally, attempting to be serious, as depicted by the chief character of “The Alienist,” who makes naively grandiose claims for his Brazilian hometown at the expense of the cultural capitals of Europe. Signifiers of new wealth and social status abound through the landmarks that populate Machado’s stories, enlivening a world in the throes of transformation: from the elegant gardens of Passeio Público and the vibrant Rua do Ouvidor—the long, narrow street of fashionable shops, theaters and cafés, “the Via Dolorosa of long-suffering husbands”—to the port areas of Saúde and Gamboa, and the former Valongo slave market.

One of the greatest masters of the twentieth century, Machado reveals himself to be an obsessive collector of other people’s lives, who writes: “There are no mysteries for an author who can scrutinize every nook and cranny of the human heart.” Now, The Collected Stories of Machado de Assis brings together, for the first time in English, all of the stories contained in the seven collections published in his lifetime, from 1870 to 1906. A landmark literary event, this majestic translation reintroduces a literary giant who must finally be integrated into the world literary canon.

Perfeita e bonita formatação, navegação funcional entre as partes da obra, ilustrado. Formato Epub3.


* Lançamento da 1. Edição Junho/2015


- Texto revisado e conforme novo acordo ortográfico de 2009. 

- Inclui biografia ilustrada do autor, com análises e críticas por contemporâneos 


Esta é a coletânea definitiva de poesias de Machado de Assis, além de trazer suas conhecidas coletâneas, traz ainda a coletânea exclusiva da LL Library "Poesias Avulsos" que reúne todos os poemas de Machado que foram publicados em jornais e periódicos diversos nunca antes reunidos em um único volume. Segue abaixo a lista das coletâneas e seus poemas: 


CRISÁLIDAS (1864) 

* MUSA CONSOLATRIX 

* VISIO 

* QUINZE ANOS 

* STELLA 

* EPITÁFIO DO MÉXICO 

* POLÔNIA 

* ERRO 

* ELEGIA 

* SINHÁ 

* HORAS VIVAS 

* VERSOS A CORINA 

* ÚLTIMA FOLHA 

* LÚCIA 

* O DILÚVIO 

* FÉ 

* A CARIDADE 

* A JOVEM CATIVA 

* NO LIMIAR 

* ASPIRAÇÃO 

* CLEÓPATRA - Canto de um escravo 

* OS ARLEQUINS 

* AS ONDINAS - (Noturno de H. Heine) 

* MARIA DUPLESSIS 

* AS ROSAS 

* OS DOIS HORIZONTES 

* MONTE ALVERNE 

* AS VENTOINHAS 

* ALPUJARRA 

* EMBIRRAÇÃO 

* POSFÁCIO - CARTA AO DR. CAETANO FILGUEIRAS 


FALENAS (1870) 

* FLOR DA MOCIDADE 

* QUANDO ELA FALA 

* MANHÃ DE INVERNO 

* LA MARCHESA DE MIRAMAR 

* SOMBRAS 

* ITE, MISSA EST 

* RUÍNAS 

* MUSA DOS OLHOS VERDES 

* NOIVADO 

* A ELVIRA 

* LÁGRIMAS DE CERA 

* LIVROS E FLORES 

* PÁSSAROS 

* O VERME 

* UN VIEUX PAYS 

* LUZ ENTRE SOMBRAS 

* LIRA CHINESA 

* UMA ODE DE ANACREONTE 

* PÁLIDA ELVIRA 

* PRELÚDIO 

* VISÃO 

* MENINA E MOÇA 

* NO ESPAÇO 

* OS DEUSES DA GRÉCIA 

* CEGONHAS E RODOVALHOS 

* A UM LEGISTA 

* ESTÂNCIAS A EMA 

* A MORTE DE OFÉLIA 



AMERICANAS (1875) 

* POTIRA 

* NIÂNI (HISTÓRIA GUAICURU) 

* A CRISTÃ-NOVA 

* JOSÉ BONIFÁCIO 

* A VISÃO DE JACIÚCA 

* A GONÇALVES DIAS 

* OS SEMEADORES 

* A FLOR DO EMBIRUÇU 

* LUA NOVA 

* SABINA 

* ÚLTIMA JORNADA 

* OS ORIZES (FRAGMENTO) 

* CANTIGA DO ROSTO BRANCO 


GAZETA DE HOLANDA (1886) 

* Ao todo são 48 poesias, numeradas e classificadas conforme data de publicação na "Gazeta de Notícias". 


OCIDENTAIS (1901) 

* O DESFECHO 

* CÍRCULO VICIOSO 

* UMA CRIATURA 

* A ARTUR DE OLIVEIRA, ENFERMO 

* MUNDO INTERIOR 

* O CORVO 

* PERGUNTAS SEM RESPOSTA 

* TO BE OR NOT TO BE 

* LINDÓIA 

* SUAVE MARI MAGNO 

* A MOSCA AZUL 

* ANTONIO JOSÉ 

* ESPINOSA 

* GONÇALVES CRESPO 

* ALENCAR 

* CAMÕES 

* JOSÉ DE ANCHIETA 

* SONETO DE NATAL 

* OS ANIMAIS ISCADOS DA PESTE 

* DANTE 

* A FELÍCIO DOS SANTOS 

* MARIA 

* A UMA SENHORA QUE ME PEDIU VERSOS 

* CLÓDIA 

* NO ALTO 


O ALMADA (1910) 


POESIAS AVULSAS (1855-1939) 

+ 109 poemas.

(Lista de poemas: http://www.amazon.com.br/Poesias-Avulsas-Ilustrado-Biografia-%C3%8Dndice-ebook/dp/B00KMJAUI6)



*** Conheça a Série "Obras Completas de Machado de Assis":

* Romances de Machado de Assis - Obras Completas [Ilustrado, Notas, Biografia com Análises e Críticas, Resumos e Estudos de Cada Obra] - Dom Casmurro, Brás Cubas, Quincas Borba e outros - Vol. I

* Contos de Machado de Assis - Obras Completas [Ilustrado, Notas, Biografia com Análises e Críticas] - Vol. II 

* Poesias de Machado de Assis - Obras Completas  [Ilustrado, Notas, Biografia com Análises e Críticas] - Vol. III 

* Crônicas de Machado de Assis - Obras Completas  [Ilustrado, Notas, Biografia com Análises e Críticas] - Vol. IV 

* Teatro de Machado de Assis - Obras Completas  [Ilustrado, Notas, Biografia com Análises e Críticas] - Vol. V 

* Críticas de Machado de Assis - Obras Completas  [Ilustrado, Notas, Biografia com Análises e Críticas] - Vol. VI 

* Textos Dispersos de Machado de Assis - Obras Completas [Ilustrado, Notas, Biografia com Análises e Críticas] - Vol. VII

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