You want the most important ideas on management all in one place. Now you can have them—in a set of HBR's 10 Must Reads. We've combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles on strategy, change leadership, managing people, and managing yourself and selected the most important ones to help you maximize your performance.

This six-title collection includes only the most critical articles from the world’s top management experts, curated from Harvard Business Review’s rich archives. We’ve done the work of selecting them so you won’t have to. These books are packed with enduring advice from the best minds in business such as: Michael Porter, Clayton Christensen, Peter Drucker, John Kotter, Daniel Goleman, Jim Collins, Ted Levitt, Gary Hamel, W. Chan Kim, Renée Mauborgne and much more.

The HBR’s 10 Must Reads Boxed Set includes:

HBR’s 10 Must Reads: The Essentials
This book brings together the best thinking from management’s most influential experts. Once you’ve read these definitive articles, you can delve into each core topic the series explores: managing yourself, managing people, leadership, strategy, and change management.

HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Managing Yourself
The path to your professional success starts with a critical look in the mirror. Here’s how to stay engaged throughout your 50-year work life, tap into your deepest values, solicit candid feedback, replenish your physical and mental energy, and rebound from tough times. This book includes the bonus article “How Will You Measure Your Life?” by Clayton M. Christensen.

HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Managing People
Managing your employees is fraught with challenges, even if you’re a seasoned pro. Boost their performance by tailoring your management styles to their temperaments, motivating with responsibility rather than money, and fostering trust through solicited input. This book includes the bonus article “Leadership That Gets Results,” by Daniel Goleman.

HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Leadership
Are you an extraordinary leader—or just a good manager? Learn how to motivate others to excel, build your team’s confidence, set direction, encourage smart risk-taking, credit others for your success, and draw strength from adversity. This book includes the bonus article “What Makes an Effective Executive,” by Peter F. Drucker.

HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Strategy
Is your company spending too much time on strategy development, with too little to show for it? Discover what it takes to distinguish your company from rivals, clarify what it will (and won’t) do, create blue oceans of uncontested market space, and make your priorities explicit so employees can realize your vision. This book includes the bonus article “What Is Strategy?” by Michael E. Porter.

HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Change Management
Most companies’ change initiatives fail—but yours can beat the odds. Learn how to overcome addiction to the status quo, establish a sense of urgency, mobilize commitment and resources, silence naysayers, minimize the pain of change, and motivate change even when business is good. This book includes the bonus article “Leading Change,” by John P. Kotter.

About the HBR’s 10 Must Reads Series:
HBR's 10 Must Reads series is the definitive collection of ideas and best practices for aspiring and experienced leaders alike. These books offer essential reading selected from the pages of Harvard Business Review on topics critical to the success of every manager. Each book is packed with advice and inspiration from the best minds in business.
Concept of the Corporation was the first study ever of the constitution, structure, and internal dynamics of a major business enterprise. Basing his work on a two-year analysis of the company done during the closing years of World War II, Drucker looks at the General Motors managerial organization from within. He tries to understand what makes the company work so effectively, what its core principles are, and how they contribute to its successes. The themes this volume addresses go far beyond the business corporation, into a consideration of the dynamics of the so-called corporate state itself.

When the book initially appeared, General Motors managers rejected it as unfairly critical and antibusiness. Yet, the GM concept of the corporation and its principles of organization later became models for organizations worldwide. Not only businesses, but also government agencies, research laboratories, hospitals, and universities have found in Concept of the Corporation a basis for effective organization and management.

Because it offers a fundamental theory of corporate goals, this book is a valuable resource for business professionals and organization analysts. It will also be of interest to students and professionals in economics, public administration, and political science. Professional and technical readers who admire Peter Drucker's work will want to be certain this volume is in their personal library. At a time when everything from the size to the structure of corporations is being questioned, this classic should prove a valuable guide.

"Success in the knowledge economy comes to those who know themselves - their strengths, their values, and how they best perform." -Peter F. Drucker
Throughout history, people had little need to manage their careers - they were born into their stations in life or, in the recent past, they relied on their companies to chart their career paths. But times have drastically changed. Today we must all learn to manage ourselves.
What does that mean? As Peter Drucker tells us in this seminal article, first published in 1999, it means we have to learn to develop ourselves. We have to place ourselves where we can make the greatest contribution to our organizations and communities. And we have to stay mentally alert and engaged during a 50-year working life, which means knowing how and when to change the work we do.
It may seem obvious that people achieve results by doing what they are good at and by working in ways that fit their abilities. But, Drucker says, very few people actually know - let alone take advantage of - their fundamental strengths.
He challenges each of us to ask ourselves, "What are my strengths? How do I perform? What are my values? Where do I belong? What should my contribution be?"
Don't try to change yourself, Drucker cautions. Instead, concentrate on improving the skills you have and accepting assignments that are tailored to your individual way of working. If you do that, you can transform yourself from an ordinary worker into an outstanding performer.
Today's successful careers are not planned out in advance. They develop when people are prepared for opportunities because they have asked themselves those questions and have rigorously assessed their unique characteristics.
"Great managers may be charismatic or dull, generous or tightfisted, visionary or numbers oriented. But every effective executive follows eight simple practices." -Peter F. Drucker
An effective executive does not need to be a leader in the sense that the term is now most commonly used. Harry Truman did not have one ounce of charisma, for example, yet he was among the most effective chief executives in U.S. history. Similarly, some of the best business and nonprofit CEOs Drucker has worked with over his 65-year consulting career were not stereotypical leaders. They were all over the map in terms of their personalities, attitudes, values, strengths, and weaknesses. They ranged from extroverted to nearly reclusive, from easygoing to controlling, from generous to parsimonious.
What made them all effective is that they followed the same six practices:
1. They asked, "What needs to be done?"
2. They asked, "What is right for the enterprise?"
3. They developed action plans.
4. They took responsibility for decisions.
5. They took responsibility for communicating.
6. They were focused on opportunities rather than problems.
This concise audiobook is based on Mr. Drucker's summary of The Effective Executive done at the request of Harvard Business Reviewand is now one of their best selling published works. This article is a perfect way to learn about the subject broadly in a short period of time. Unlike many articles of this kind, summarizing a book's contents, this article was written and crafted by the author himself. The Audiobook has nine tracks. 1. Introduction. 2. Get the Knowledge You Need. 3. Write an Action Plan. 4. Act. 5. Take Responsibility for Decisions. 6. Take Responsibility for Communicating. 7. Focus on Opportunities. 8. Make Meetings Productive. 9. Think and Say "We."
How much of innovation is inspiration, and how much is hard work? The answer lies somewhere in the middle, says management thinker Peter Drucker. In this HBR classic from 1985, he argues that innovation is real work that can and should be managed like any other corporate function. Success is more likely to result from the systematic pursuit of opportunities than from a flash of genius. Indeed, most innovative business ideas arise through the methodical analysis of seven areas of opportunity.
Within a company or industry, opportunities can be found in unexpected occurrences, incongruities of various kinds, process needs, or changes in an industry or market. Outside a company, opportunities arise from demographic changes, changes in perception, or new knowledge. There is some overlap among the sources, and the potential for innovation may well lie in more than one area at a time. Innovations based on new knowledge tend to have the greatest effect on the marketplace, but it often takes decades before the ideas are translated into actual products, processes, or services. The other sources of innovation are easier and simpler to handle, yet they still require managers to look beyond established practices, Drucker explains. The author emphasizes that innovators need to look for simple, focused solutions to real problems. Subjects covered include creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation.
This audiobook has 9 tracks, the first being the Introduction and the last the principles of Innovation according to Peter Drucker. The middle tracks are the 7 places to look for opportunities. 1. Introduction: 7 Places to Look for Opportunities. 2. Unexpected Occurrences. 3. Incongruities. 4. Process Needs. 5. Industry & Market Changes. 6. Demographic Changes. 7. Changes in Perception and Mood. 8. New Knowledge. 9. Principles of Innovation.
The Theory of the Business

This audio book was created based on Peter Drucker's long business, consulting, and writing career. He focuses on what to do, what not to do, and how to keep a clear corporate identity and mission. He addresses how all organizations eventually go obsolete and their theory of their business no longer works. It addresses how GM did not move from income based to lifestyle based marketing for their cars, thus hastening their demise after 7 decades of success betting on incomes only. He also points out, though, that the GM theory of the business still worked for Hughes and EDS, which GM bought. He describes how organizations must choose how to do things. This, he says, is why IBM was paralyzed by the different requirements of a PC versus Mainframe business. He states there are 4 specifications for a valid theory of a business: assumptions must fit reality; these assumptions about the environment, mission, and core competencies must fit together, the entire organization must know and understand the theory of the business and act accordingly, and the theory of the business must be tested constantly to be kept up to date. When testing the theory of the business, three things must be done if there is an issue: preventive care, early diagnosis before the problem becomes fatal, and applying the cure. This is a must read for all managers and entrepreneurs in all types of organizations, from nonprofit, educational, government, to companies.

Keywords: Drucker, corporate identity, mission, focus, GM, IBM, Hughes, EDS, Obsolescence, business, entrepreneur, management, nonprofit, assumptions, organization, lifestyle, marketing, environment, society, mission, core, competency, executives.
What Only the CEO Can Do?

This Harvard Business Review (HBR) article describes and focuses on the unique tasks only a CEO can perform. The core elements of this article were created by Peter Drucker. They were then updated and further refined by former P & G CEO, Arthur Lafley. This article and our corresponding Harvard Thoughts audio book define the importance of the CEO focusing his or her organization first on the most meaningful outsider, the customer.

Then Drucker addresses the concept of What Business are You In (also see our HBR based audio book,
What Business are You In? by Ted Levitt) and how this is a task only the CEO can perform. The CEO must identify the organization’s core competencies and shed the non-core ones. Lafley describes how he did this at P & G with Peter Drucker’s assistance by focusing on core brands for P & G to be more nimble in their marketing efforts and by spinning off secondary ones to companies such as Smuckers who added these brands to their core product lines. P & G also benefited financially from this refocusing by becoming a major Smuckers’ shareholder.

Drucker then emphasized the second key CEO task, balancing short term against long term needs to earn sufficient present income to support investments for the future to sustain and grow the company over extended periods of time.

And finally they stated that the third key CEO task was to establish clear values and core standards in an organization. They emphasized this meant the CEO must make sure these are completed understood and internalized throughout the organization, from top to bottom.

Keywords: HBR, Harvard, Harvard Business School, HBS, emotional intelligence, self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, social skills, talents, skills, CEO, executive, manager, values, goals, objectives, long term, core standards.
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