The Delphi Poets Series offers readers the works of literature's finest poets, with superior formatting. This monumental volume presents for the first time ever the complete works of William Blake, featuring all of the poetry and the entire corpus of engravings and paintings, as well as the usual Delphi bonus material. (58MB Version 1)

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* Beautifully illustrated with numerous images relating to Blake's life and works
* Concise introductions to the poetry and other works
* Images of how the poetry books were first printed, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* Excellent formatting of the poems
* Famous poetry collections like SONGS OF INNOCENCE are fully illustrated with the text
* Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the poetry
* Easily locate the poems you want to read
* Includes a special 'Plates' section with Blake's complete engravings, paintings and illustrations - spend hours exploring Blake's artistic genius in over 1,100 images!
* Features two biographies - discover Blake's literary life
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

CONTENTS:

The Poetry and Prose Books
POETICAL SKETCHES
AN ISLAND IN THE MOON
ALL RELIGIONS ARE ONE
THERE IS NO NATURAL RELIGION
TIRIEL
SONGS OF INNOCENCE
THE BOOK OF THEL
THE MARRIAGE OF HEAVEN AND HELL
THE FRENCH REVOLUTION
VISIONS OF THE DAUGHTERS OF ALBION
AMERICA A PROPHECY
EUROPE A PROPHECY
THE FIRST BOOK OF URIZEN
SONGS OF EXPERIENCE
THE BOOK OF LOS
THE SONG OF LOS
THE BOOK OF AHANIA
THE FOUR ZOAS
MILTON A POEM
JERUSALEM: THE EMANATION OF THE GIANT ALBION
SONGS AND BALLADS FROM BLAKE'S NOTEBOOK (1793)
SATIRIC VERSES AND EPIGRAMS FROM BLAKE'S NOTEBOOK
UNCOLLECTED WORKS

The Poems
LIST OF POEMS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
LIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

The Plates
CATALOGUE OF VISUAL WORKS

The Biographies
WILLIAM BLAKE by Irene Langridge
WILLIAM BLAKE by Charles Gardner
This carefully crafted ebook: "The Book of Urizen (Illuminated Manuscript with the Original Illustrations of William Blake)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Book of Urizen is one of the major prophetic books of the English poet William Blake, illustrated by Blake’s own plates. It was originally published as The First Book of Urizen in 1794. Later editions dropped the word “first”. The book takes its name from the character Urizen in Blake’s mythology, who represents alienated reason as the source of oppression. The book describes Urizen as the “primeaval priest”, and describes how he became separated from the other Eternals to create his own alienated and enslaving realm of religious dogma. Los and Enitharmon create a space within Urizen’s fallen universe to give birth to their son Orc, the spirit of revolution and freedom. In form, the book is a parody of the Book of Genesis, with Blake’s Urizen being more similar to the demiurge of the Gnostics than a benevolent creator. The poems of William Blake reinterpret the spiritual history of the human race from the fall from Eden to the beginning of the French Revolution. Blake believed in the correspondence between the physical world and the spiritual world and used poetic metaphor to express these beliefs. In his poetry, we hear a man who look's for mankind to salvage his redemption from oppression through resurgence of imaginative life. The power of repression is a constant theme in Blake's poems and he articulates his belief in the titanic forces of revolt and the struggle for freedom against the guardians of tradition. "William Blake (1757 – 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age.
'Every page is a window open in Heaven ... interwoven designs companion the poems, and gold and yellow tints diffuse themselves over the page like summer clouds. The poems [of Song of Innocence] are the morning song of Blake's genius.' - W.B. Yeats'
Blake sang of the ideal world, of the truth of the intellect, and of the divinity of imagination ... The only writer to have written songs for children with the soul of a child ... he holds, in my view, a unique position because he unites intellectual sharpness with mystic sentiment.' - James Joyce
Song of Innocence and of Experience is a rare and wonderful book, its seeming simplicity belying its visionary wisdom. Internationally recognised as a masterpiece of English literature, it also occupies a key position in the history of western art. This unique edition of the work allows Blake to communicate with his readers as he intended, reproducing Blake's own illumination and lettering from the finest existing example of the original work. In this way readers can experience the mystery and beauty of Blake's poems as he first created them, discovering for themselves the intricate webs of symbol and meaning that connects word and image. Each poem is accompanied by a literal transcription, and the volume is introduced by the renowned historian and critic, Richard Holmes. This beautiful edition of Song of Innocence and of Experience will be essential for those familiar with Blake's work, but also offers an ideal way into his visionary world for those encountering Blake for the first time.

Songs of Innocence and of Experience is an collection of poems by William Blake. It appeared in two phases. A few first copies were printed and illuminated by William Blake himself in 1789; five years later he bound these poems with a set of new poems in a volume titled Songs of Innocence and of Experience Shewing the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul. William Blake was also a painter before the songs of innocence and experience and made paintings such as Oberon, Titania, and Puck dancing with fairies.

"Innocence" and "Experience" are definitions of consciousness that rethink Milton's existential-mythic states of "Paradise" and "Fall". Often, interpretations of this collection centre around a mythical dualism, where "Innocence" represents the "unfallen world" and "Experience" represents the "fallen world". Blake categorizes our modes of perception that tend to coordinate with a chronology that would become standard in Romanticism: childhood is a state of protected innocence rather than original sin, but not immune to the fallen world and its institutions. This world sometimes impinges on childhood itself, and in any event becomes known through "experience", a state of being marked by the loss of childhood vitality, by fear and inhibition, by social and political corruption, and by the manifold oppression of Church, State, and the ruling classes. The volume's "Contrary States" are sometimes signalled by patently repeated or contrasted titles: in Innocence, Infant Joy, in Experience, Infant Sorrow; in Innocence, The Lamb, in Experience, The Fly and The Tyger. The stark simplicity of poems such as The Chimney Sweeper and The Little Black Boy display Blake's acute sensibility to the realities of poverty and exploitation that accompanied the "Dark Satanic Mills" of the Industrial Revolution.

01. F.Scott Fitzgerald - The Curious Case of Benjamin Button 02. O.Henry - The Gift of the Magi 03. Mark Twain - On The Decay of the Art of Lying 04. Sun Tzu - The Art of War 05. E.A. Poe - The Raven 06. Kahlil Gibran - The Madman 07. W.W. Jacobs - The Monkey's Paw 08. Anonymous - Aladdin 09. The Founding Fathers - The Declaration of Independence 10. Plato - The Apology of Socrates 11. Lord Alfred Tennyson - Charge of the Light Brigade 12. T.S. Eliot - The Waste Land 13. William Dean Howells - Wild Flowers of the Asphalt 14. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels - The Communist Manifesto 15. E.A. Poe - The Pit and the Pendulum 16. F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Offshore Pirate 17. Leo Tolstoy - A Letter to a Hindu 18. Washington Irving - The Legend of Sleepy Hollow 19. Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Kubla Khan 20. F. Scott Fitzgerald - Camel's Back 21. Bram Stoker - The Judge's House 22. Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching 23. Plato - The Allegory of the Cave 24. Oscar Wilde - The Happy Prince 25. Oscar Wilde - The Nightingale and the Rose 26. William Blake - Songs of Innocence 27. Patrick Henry - Give Me Liberty 28. H.G. Wells - The Magic Shop 29. Saki - The Music on the Hill 30. Herman Melville - Bartleby the scrivener 31. Mark Twain - The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County 32. Clement Clarke Moore - Twas the Night Before Christmas 33. Bret Harte - The Luck of Roaring Camp 34. O.Henry - The Caballero's Way 35. T.S. Eliot - The Love Song of J. Alfred Profrock 36. Immanuel Kant - Answering the Question: What is Enlightenment? 37. Jack London - To Build a Fire 38. Edgar Allan Poe - The Fall of the House of Usher 39. Henry Ford - The Terror of the Machine 40. G.K. Chesterton - The Blue Cross 41. Charles Perrault - Cinderella 42. Anton Chekhov - Difficult People 43. D.H. Lawrence - The Prussian Officer 44. Fyodor Dostoevsky - The Dream of A Ridiculous Man 45. Franz Kafka - The Judgement 46. James Joyce - The Dead 47. Saki - The Unrest Cure 48. John Muir - Steep Trails 49. Anton Chekhov - Lady with a Dog 50. Anton Chekhov - The Wife
William Blake was born on 28th November 1757 in London to parents of modest income that could only afford a basic education of reading and writing although he did attend a drawing school for a short time. His artistic skill was apparent relatively early and at the age of 14 he stopped working in his father’s hosiery shop and became an apprentice engraver. This apprenticeship finished when he was 21 and at 25 he married Catherine Boucher. He taught her to read and write and together in 1789 they published Songs of Innocence with text and engravings printed from copper plates and illustrations finished by hand with watercolours. It did not sell well and throughout his life he remained largely unrecognised often on the verge of poverty. This led to a deep depression for many years and he was often considered mad by his contemporaries. His creativity and imagination with its undercurrents of mysticism, spiritualism and philosophy are apparent in this selection of poems and whilst classed as a seminal figure in the Romantic Age it wasn’t until the late 19th century that his work was recognised. The 20th century saw an even greater appreciation of his poetry with Blake’s voyage beyond the rational and material chiming with the Beat poets, Dylan, Van Morrison and Jim Morrison of the band the Doors , named after Blake’s phrase Doors of Perception from his poem Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Further acclaim has been attributed to him from many scholars of art, psychology and of course literature. His poems have inspired composers such as Vaughn Williams, Britten and Taverner and Jerusalem a hymn still sung today. Blake’s vivid and intense work is still relevant to all to this day and he is recognised as a saint in the Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica. William Blake died on 12th August 1827 and in 1957 a memorial was erected at Poet’s Corner in Westminster Abbey. Here we present two of his exceptionally fine epic poems.
William Blake was born on 28th November 1757 in London to parents of modest income that could only afford a basic education of reading and writing although he did attend a drawing school for a short time. His artistic skill was apparent relatively early and at the age of 14 he stopped working in his father’s hosiery shop and became an apprentice engraver. This apprenticeship finished when he was 21 and at 25 he married Catherine Boucher. He taught her to read and write and together in 1789 they published Songs of Innocence with text and engravings printed from copper plates and illustrations finished by hand with watercolours. It did not sell well and throughout his life he remained largely unrecognised often on the verge of poverty. This led to a deep depression for many years and he was often considered mad by his contemporaries. His creativity and imagination with its undercurrents of mysticism, spiritualism and philosophy are apparent in this selection of poems and whilst classed as a seminal figure in the Romantic Age it wasn’t until the late 19th century that his work was recognised. The 20th century saw an even greater appreciation of his poetry with Blake’s voyage beyond the rational and material chiming with the Beat poets, Dylan, Van Morrison and Jim Morrison of the band the Doors , named after Blake’s phrase Doors of Perception from his poem Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Further acclaim has been attributed to him from many scholars of art, psychology and of course literature. His poems have inspired composers such as Vaughn Williams, Britten and Taverner and Jerusalem a hymn still sung today. Blake’s vivid and intense work is still relevant to all to this day and he is recognised as a saint in the Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica. William Blake died on 12th August 1827 and in 1957 a memorial was erected at Poet’s Corner in Westminster Abbey.
English Poetry, Volume 1 – An Introduction. The English language has grown into the Worlds pre-dominant spoken language. It’s estimated there are over one million words with which to do this. It’s sources are rich and diverse, absorbing from other cultures and times without hesitation. It surely follows that when we add the talents of Shakespeare, Keats, Shelley, Kipling and Blake to a myriad of others that its beauty and reach entrance us with their thoughts and visions. In two volumes these remarkable poems present a wonderful companion through the long heritage of the English Language and its poets. The poems in volume 1 are; English Poetry - An Introduction; The Passionate Shepherd To His Love - Christopher Marlowe; The Face That Launched A Thousand Ships - Christopher Marlowe; Shall I Compare Thee To A Summers Day (Sonnet 18) - William Shakespeare; Let Me Not To The Marriage Of True Minds - William Shakespeare; To Celia - Ben Jonson; On My First Son - Ben Jonson; The Good Morrow - John Donne; Witchcraft By A Picture - John Donne; On Shakespeare - John Milton; On The Morning Of Christ’s Nativity - John Milton; To His Coy Mistress - Andrew Marvell; A True Born Englishman - Daniel Defoe; A Song For St Cecilia's Day - John Dryden; from The Rape Of The Lock - Alexander Pope; Summer - Alexander Pope; Elergy Written In A Country Churchyard - Thomas Gray; The Lamb - William Blake; The Tiger - William Blake; How Sweet I Roam'd From Field To Field - William Blake; Composed Upon Westminster Bridge - William Wordsworth; Daffodils - William Wordsworth; September 1819 - William Wordsworth; Frost At Midnight - Samuel Taylor Coleridge; Work Without Hope - Samuel Taylor Coleridge; Ozymandias - Percy Bysshe Shelley; Ode To The West Wind - Percy Bysshe Shelley; Short Extract From Prometheus Unbound - Percy Bysshe Shelley; I Am - John Clare; Ode To A Nightingale - John Keats; Ode To Autumn - John Keats
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