Loser

HarperCollins

Narrated by Steve Buscemi

3 hr 53 min
3

From renowned Newbery-winning author Jerry Spinelli comes a powerful story about how not fitting in just might lead to an incredible life. This classic book is perfect for fans of Gordon Korman and Carl Hiaasen.

Just like other kids, Zinkoff rides his bike, hopes for snow days, and wants to be like his dad when he grows up. But Zinkoff also raises his hand with all the wrong answers, trips over his own feet, and falls down with laughter over a word like "Jabip."

Other kids have their own word to describe him, but Zinkoff is too busy to hear it. He doesn't know he's not like everyone else. And one winter night, Zinkoff's differences show that any name can someday become "hero."

With some of his finest writing to date and great wit and humor, Jerry Spinelli creates a story about a boy's individuality surpassing the need to fit in and the genuine importance of failure. As readers follow Zinkoff from first through sixth grade, it becomes impossible not to identify with and root for him through failures and triumphs. The perfect classroom read.

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Additional Information

Publisher
HarperCollins
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Published on
Jan 8, 2008
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Duration
3h 53m 4s
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ISBN
9780061628733
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Language
English
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Genres
Juvenile Fiction / Social Themes / Bullying
Juvenile Fiction / Social Themes / Emotions & Feelings
Juvenile Fiction / Social Themes / Self-Esteem & Self-Reliance
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Export option
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Eligible for Family Library

Listening information

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The beloved coming-of-age novel from the author whose “name has long been synonymous with young adult fiction” (Los Angeles Times).
 
“Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret is very special.” —Amy Poehler (Vulture)
 
“Generations of teenage girls have grown up reading the tales of teenage angst told by beloved author Judy Blume.” —Mashable
 
Margaret Simon, almost twelve, has just moved from New York City to the suburbs, and she’s anxious to fit in with her new friends. When she’s asked to join a secret club she jumps at the chance. But when the girls start talking about boys, bras, and getting their first periods, Margaret starts to wonder if she’s normal. There are some things about growing up that are hard for her to talk about, even with her friends. Lucky for Margaret, she’s got someone else to confide in . . . someone who always listens.
 
“The first Judy Blume books I read. . . served as a kind of introduction to myself.” —John Green quoted in The New York Times
 
“Mention Judy Blume to almost any woman under a certain age and you're likely to get this reaction: Her face lights up, and she's transported back to her childhood self — curled up with a book she knows will speak directly to her anxieties about relationships, self-image and measuring up.” —NPR
 
“Fans, readers, booksellers — even other authors and celebrities — often dissolve into tears upon meeting [Judy Blume], confessing that books like “Forever ... ” and “Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret” got them through adolescence; taught them about sex, love and friendship; and provided their first glimpse of adulthood.” —The New York Times 
 
“Blume wasn’t the first writer to legitimize and celebrate the interior life of young girls. . . . But Blume’s work feels significantly more influential than that of her predecessors and peers.” —The New Yorker
 
“These stories belong to young women. Real young women.” —Diablo Cody, Entertainment Weekly
From Newbery Medalist Jerry Spinelli (Maniac Magee, Stargirl) comes the "moving and memorable" (Kirkus Reviews, starred) story of a girl searching for happiness inside the walls of a prison.
 
Cammie O'Reilly lives at the Hancock County Prison--not as a prisoner, she's the warden's daughter. She spends the mornings hanging out with shoplifters and reformed arsonists in the women's excercise yard, which gives Cammie a certain cache with her school friends. 

But even though Cammie's free to leave the prison, she's still stuck. And sad, and really mad. Her mother died saving her from harm when she was just a baby. You wouldn't think you could miss something you never had, but on the eve of her thirteenth birthday, the thing Cammie most wants is a mom. A prison might not be the best place to search for a mother, but Cammie is determined and she's willing to work with what she's got.
 
"Jerry Spinelli again proves why he's the king of storytellers" (Shelf Awarenss, starred) in this tale of a girl who learns that heroes can come in surprising disguises, and that even if we don't always get what we want, sometimes we really do get what we need.
 
"This book is never boring and never predictable. Fame, good and bad fortune, friendship and mental illness all make their way into [Cammie's] narrative."—The New York Times Book Review

Praise for the works of Jerry Spinelli:
 
“Spinelli is a poet of the prepubescent. . . . No writer guides his young characters, and his readers, past these pitfalls and challenges and toward their futures with more compassion.” —The New York Times
 
“It's almost unreal how much the children's book still resonates.” —Bustle.com on Maniac Magee
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