TIM TIM TAMYTAM - An Elfish Tale

Baba Indaba Children's Stories

Book 345
Abela Publishing Ltd
Free sample

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 345

In this 345thÿÿissue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Fairy Tale "TIM TIM TAMYTAM?.

This story happened in a great forest far, far away and a long time ago. Mr Tamytam, Tim Tim to his friends and Mrs Tamytam, Tum Tum to her friends, were on there way back from visiting friends when they came across a felled tree.

Tim Tim ran home to fetch a candle only to find his house was a total mess. He then remembered that Mrs Fuzzytail, who lived at the top of the tree with her brood of children, had invited the carpenter ants in to make another room. It looked like the carpenter ants had got a bit carried away and undermined the strength of the tree causing it to fall down when the next storm blew through.

So, what did Tim Tim and Tum Tum do now that they had no home. Do you have any ideas? Well, to find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

ÿ

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

ÿ

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

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About the author

The Baba Indaba Children's Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often uses folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as The Little Glass Slipper, or Cenerentola (Italian),ÿ Cendrillon, ou La petite Pantoufle de Verre (French), Aschenputtel (German), Tattercoats and Cap o? Rushes (English), or Conkiajgharuna (Georgian). There is still debate as to whether the story originated in Egypt or China. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name "Anon E. Mouse" which, of course, is a play on the word "Anonymous".

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Mar 6, 2017
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Pages
26
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 346

In this 346thÿÿissue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Fairy Tale "THE PARADISE FOR CHILDREN?.

Long, long ago and far, far away, when this old world was in its tender infancy, there was a child, named Epimetheus, who never had either father or mother; and, that he might not be lonely, another child, fatherless and motherless like himself, was sent from a far country, to live with him, and be his playfellow and helpmate. Her name was Pandora.

The first thing that Pandora saw, when she entered the cottage where Epimetheus dwelt, was a great box. And almost the first question which she put to him, after crossing the threshold, was this,?

"Epimetheus, what have you in that box?"

"My dear little Pandora," answered Epimetheus, "that is a secret, and you must be kind enough not to ask any questions about it. The box was left here to be kept safely, and I do not myself know what it contains."

"But who gave it to you?" asked Pandora. "And where did it come from?"

"That is a secret, too," replied Epimetheus.What happened next you ask?? Well many things happened, some silly and some serious. To find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

Try as Pandora might her interest was aroused Until one day Pandora opened the box??..

What was in the box you may ask? Did anything jump out and give her a fright? Well you could say so?..But to find the answers to your questions, you will have to download and read this story.

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

ÿ

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 347

In this 347thÿissue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Greek Fairy Tale "THE THREE GOLDEN APPLES?.

Have you ever hear of the golden apples, that grew in the garden of the Hesperides? Ah, those were such apples as would bring a great price, by the bushel, if any of them could be found growing in the orchards of nowadays! But there is not, I suppose, a graft of that wonderful fruit on a single tree in the wide world. Not so much as a seed of those apples exists any longer.

And, even in the old, old, half-forgotten times, before the garden of the Hesperides was overrun with weeds, a great many people doubted whether there could be real trees that bore apples of solid gold upon their branches. All had heard of them, but nobody remembered to have seen any. Children, nevertheless, used to listen, open-mouthed, to stories of the golden apple-tree, and resolved to discover it, when they should be big enough. Adventurous young men, who desired to do a braver thing than any of their fellows, set out in quest of this fruit. Many of them returned no more; none of them brought back the apples. No wonder that they found it impossible to gather them! It is said that there was a dragon beneath the tree, with a hundred terrible heads, fifty of which were always on the watch, while the other fifty slept.

But then the adventure was undertaken by a hero who had enjoyed very little peace or rest since he came into the world. At the time he was wandering through the land with a mighty club in his hand, and a bow and quiver slung across his shoulders. He was dressed in the skin of the biggest and fiercest lion that had ever been seen, and which he himself had killed; although, on the whole, he was kind, generous and noble. Even so, there was a good deal of the lion's fierceness in his heart for his name was Hercules (also known as Heracles).

Everywhere he went he asked if anyone had news of the garden or if they could give directions to it.

Did Hercules ever get directions to the garden of the Hesperides? Did he ever find his way there, when so many before him had failed? If he did get to the garden was he able to gain entry and did he get to pick a golden apple? So many questions??..

To find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

ÿ

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

ÿ

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 348

In this 348thÿÿissue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Greek Fairy Tale "THE MIRACULOUS PITCHER?.

One evening, in times long ago in Greece, old Philemon and his old wife Baucis sat at their cottage-door, enjoying the calm and beautiful sunset. They had already eaten their frugal supper, and intended now to spend a quiet hour or two before bedtime. So they talked together about their garden, and their cow, and their bees, and their grapevine, which clambered over the cottage-wall, and on which the grapes were beginning to turn purple. But the rude shouts of children and the fierce barking of dogs, in the village near at hand, grew louder and louder, until, at last, it was hardly possible for Baucis and Philemon to hear each other speak.

"Ah, wife," cried Philemon, "I fear some poor traveller is seeking hospitality among our neighbours yonder, and, instead of giving him food and lodging, they have set their dogs at him, as their custom is!"

When the strangers arrived at the home of Baudis and Philemon they ask for refreshment and shelter. Unlike their neighbours, Baucis and Philemon invite the strangers in, even though they have scant provisions in their pantry.

They then feed and water the strangers, who all but empty the pantry. But Baucis and Philemon make no complaint. They offer them overnight shelter which is accepted and in the morning offer the strangers breakfast which is accepted.

What happened next you ask?? Were they rewarded for their generosity or did their guests leave their pantry bear and the couple hungry? To find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

ÿ

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

ÿ

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 350

In this 350thÿÿissue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Fairy Tale " PRINCESS CRYSTAL, or The Hidden Treasure?.

ONCE upon a time, long, long ago and far, far away, there were the four Kings: the King of the North, the region of perpetual snow; the King of the South, where the sun shines all the year round; the King of the East, from whence the cold winds blow; and the King of the West, where the gentle zephyrs breathe upon the flowers, and coax them to open their petals while the rest of the world is still sleeping.

And there was the great Dragon, who lived on top of a high mountain in the centre of the universe. He could see everything that happened everywhere by means of his magic spectacles, which enabled him to look all ways at once, and to see through solid substances; but he could only see, not hear, for he was as deaf as a post.

Now the King of the North had a beautiful daughter called Crystal. Her eyes were bright like the stars; her hair was black like the sky at night; and her skin was as white as the snow which covered the ground outside the palace where she lived, which was built entirely of crystals clear as the clearest glass.

And the King of the South had a son who had been named Sunshine on account of his brightness and warmth of heart.

The King of the East had a son who, because he was always up early and was very industrious, had been given the name of Sunrise.

The King of the West also had a son, perhaps the handsomest of the three, and always magnificently dressed; but as it took him all day to make his toilette, so that he was never seen before evening, he received the name of Sunset.

All three Princes were in love with the Princess Crystal, each hoping to win her for his bride. When they had the chance they would go and peep at her as she wandered up and down in her glass palace. But she liked Prince Sunshine best, because he stayed longer than the others, and was always such excellent company. Prince Sunrise was too busy to be able to spare her more than half an hour or so; and Prince Sunset never came until she was getting too tired and sleepy to care to see him.

It was of no use, however, for her to hope that Sunshine would be her husband just because she happened to prefer him to the others. Her father?the stern, blusterous old King, with a beard made of icicles so long that it reached to his waist and kept his heart cold?declared that he had no patience for such nonsense as likes and dislikes; and one day he announced, far and wide, in a voice that was heard by the other three Kings, and which made the earth shake so that the great green Dragon immediately looked through his spectacles to see what was happening:

"He who would win my daughter must first bring me the casket containing the Hidden Treasure, which is concealed no man knows where!"

ÿ

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What happened next you ask?? Well many things happened, some silly and some serious. To find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

And so began the quest for the hand of the princess . But who won? More importantly, just how did he win? What tactics were used? Was the princess happy with the result of the competition?

To find the se answers, and any more you may have, you will have to download and read this story for yourself?

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

ÿ

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 351

In this 351ST issue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Fairy Tale "THE STORY OF THE INVISIBLE KINGDOM?.

ONCE upon a time, long, long ago and far, far away, in a little house half-way up the mountain-side, and about a mile from the other houses of the village, there lived with his old father a young man called George. There was just enough land belonging to the house to enable the father and son to live free from care.

Behind the house a wood began, the oak trees and beech trees in which were so old that the grandchildren of the people who had planted them had been dead for more than a hundred years. In front of the house there lay a broken old mill-stone?no-one knows how it got there? But anyone sitting on the stone would have a wonderful view of the valley down below, with the river flowing through it, and of the mountains rising on the other side of the river.

In the evening, when he had finished his work in the fields, George often sat here for hours at a time dreaming, with his elbows on his knees and his head in his hands; and because he cared little for the villagers, but generally went about silent and absorbed like one who is thinking of all sorts of things, the people nicknamed him "George the Dreamer." But he did not mind it at all.

The older he grew, the more silent he became, and when at last his old father died, and he had buried him under a great old oak tree, he became quite silent. Then, when he sat on the broken mill-stone, as he did more often than before, and looked down into the lovely valley, and saw how the evening mists came into the valley at one end and slowly climbed the mountains, and how it then became darker and darker, until at last the moon and the stars appeared in the sky in their full glory, a wonderful feeling came into his heart. The waves of the river began to sing, quite softly at first, but gradually louder, until they could be heard quite plainly; and they sang of the mountains, down from which they had come, and of the sea, to which they wished to go, and of the nixies who lived far down at the bottom of the river. Then the forest began to rustle, quite differently from an ordinary forest, and it used to relate the most wonderful tales. The old oak tree especially, which stood at his father's grave, knew far more than all the other trees. The stars, high up in the sky, wanted so much to tumble down into the green forest and the blue water, that they twinkled and sparkled as if they could not bear it any longer. But the angels who stand behind the stars held them firmly in their places, and said: "Stars, stars, don't be foolish! You are much too old to do silly things?many thousand years old, and more. Stay quietly in your places."

It was truly a wonderful valley! But it was only George the Dreamer who heard and saw all that.

Now, one day as he was sitting on the mill-stone and thinking that he was quite alone in the world, he fell asleep. Then he dreamt that he saw, hanging down from the sky, a golden swing, which was fastened to two stars by silver ropes. In the swing sat a charming Princess, who was swinging so high that each time she touched the sky, then the earth, and then the sky again. Each time the swing came near the earth, the Princess clapped her hands with joy and threw George the Dreamer a rose. But suddenly the ropes broke, and the swing, with the Princess, flew far into the sky, farther and farther, until at last he could see it no longer.

Then he woke up, and when he looked round, he saw a great bunch of roses lying beside him on the mill-stone.

And so began Geoge?s quest. The quest to find the Princess on the swing.

Where did he go, what did he do? What happened to George? Well many things happened, some silly and some serious, but did George find his princess? Well, to find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

ÿ

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

ÿ

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 346

In this 346thÿÿissue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Fairy Tale "THE PARADISE FOR CHILDREN?.

Long, long ago and far, far away, when this old world was in its tender infancy, there was a child, named Epimetheus, who never had either father or mother; and, that he might not be lonely, another child, fatherless and motherless like himself, was sent from a far country, to live with him, and be his playfellow and helpmate. Her name was Pandora.

The first thing that Pandora saw, when she entered the cottage where Epimetheus dwelt, was a great box. And almost the first question which she put to him, after crossing the threshold, was this,?

"Epimetheus, what have you in that box?"

"My dear little Pandora," answered Epimetheus, "that is a secret, and you must be kind enough not to ask any questions about it. The box was left here to be kept safely, and I do not myself know what it contains."

"But who gave it to you?" asked Pandora. "And where did it come from?"

"That is a secret, too," replied Epimetheus.What happened next you ask?? Well many things happened, some silly and some serious. To find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

Try as Pandora might her interest was aroused Until one day Pandora opened the box??..

What was in the box you may ask? Did anything jump out and give her a fright? Well you could say so?..But to find the answers to your questions, you will have to download and read this story.

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

ÿ

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 216

ÿ

In this 216th issue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the European story of Beauty and the Beast.

Beauty?s father, a merchant, has a run of bad fortune, he loses all his ships in storms at sea, their house burns down and they lose almost all their possessions and are forced to move to cheaper dwellings, a small country in the cottage.

One day a messenger arrives saying, against the odds, one ship has survived and Beuaty?s father was to hasten to the port at once. But things were not as optimistic as he had hoped. He returns home in the middle of winter just as broke as he was before.

With night overtaking him as he trudged home through the snow, he mistakenly takes a wrong path and he found himself in an avenue of trees, at the entrance of which he halted and rubbed his eyes. For no snow had fallen in this avenue, and the trees were tall orange-trees, planted in four rows and covered with flowers and fruit. At the end of the avenue, straight in front of him, rose a magnificent castle in many terraces. The merchant rode around to the stable courtyard, which he found empty; and there, with half-frozen hands, he unbridled and stabled his horse. Within the doorway he found a staircase of agate with balusters of carved gold. He mounted it and passed through room after room, each more splendidly furnished than the last. They were deliciously warm, too, and he began to feel his limbs again. But he was hungry.

Feeling wary he sits on a comfortable chair and presently dozes off. A while later hunger pains awaken him and he opens his eyes to see a table with meats and wines upon it. Having fasted for more than twenty-four hours, and lost no time in falling-to. He hoped that he might soon have sight of this most hospitable entertainer, whoever he might be, and an opportunity of thanking him. No sooner had he given fancy to the thought than a hideous Beast appeared who started reaching out towards him??..

ÿ

You are invited to download and read the story of Beuaty and the Beast. Find out what the outcome of the merchant?s encounter with the Beast was?

ÿ

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

ÿ

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

ÿ

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story.

HINT - use Google maps.

ÿ

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 347

In this 347thÿissue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Greek Fairy Tale "THE THREE GOLDEN APPLES?.

Have you ever hear of the golden apples, that grew in the garden of the Hesperides? Ah, those were such apples as would bring a great price, by the bushel, if any of them could be found growing in the orchards of nowadays! But there is not, I suppose, a graft of that wonderful fruit on a single tree in the wide world. Not so much as a seed of those apples exists any longer.

And, even in the old, old, half-forgotten times, before the garden of the Hesperides was overrun with weeds, a great many people doubted whether there could be real trees that bore apples of solid gold upon their branches. All had heard of them, but nobody remembered to have seen any. Children, nevertheless, used to listen, open-mouthed, to stories of the golden apple-tree, and resolved to discover it, when they should be big enough. Adventurous young men, who desired to do a braver thing than any of their fellows, set out in quest of this fruit. Many of them returned no more; none of them brought back the apples. No wonder that they found it impossible to gather them! It is said that there was a dragon beneath the tree, with a hundred terrible heads, fifty of which were always on the watch, while the other fifty slept.

But then the adventure was undertaken by a hero who had enjoyed very little peace or rest since he came into the world. At the time he was wandering through the land with a mighty club in his hand, and a bow and quiver slung across his shoulders. He was dressed in the skin of the biggest and fiercest lion that had ever been seen, and which he himself had killed; although, on the whole, he was kind, generous and noble. Even so, there was a good deal of the lion's fierceness in his heart for his name was Hercules (also known as Heracles).

Everywhere he went he asked if anyone had news of the garden or if they could give directions to it.

Did Hercules ever get directions to the garden of the Hesperides? Did he ever find his way there, when so many before him had failed? If he did get to the garden was he able to gain entry and did he get to pick a golden apple? So many questions??..

To find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

ÿ

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

ÿ

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 300

In this 300th ÿissue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the French Fairy Tale ? ?THE RIDICULOUS WISHES?.

ONCE upon a time, long, long ago and far, far away there lived a poor woodcutter who life very hard. Indeed, it was his lot to toil for little guerdon, and although he was young and happily married there were moments when he wished himself dead and below ground.

One day while at his work he was again lamenting his fate.

"Some men," he said, "have only to make known their desires, and straightway these are granted, and their every wish fulfilled; but it has availed me little to wish for ought, for the gods are deaf to the prayers of such as I."

As he spoke these words there was a great noise of thunder, and Jupiter appeared before him wielding his mighty thunderbolts. Our poor man was stricken with fear and threw himself on the ground.

"My lord," he said, "forget my foolish speech; heed not my wishes, but cease thy thundering!"

"Have no fear," answered Jupiter; "I have heard thy plaint, and have come hither to show thee how greatly thou dost wrong me. Hark! I, who am sovereign lord of this world, promise to grant in full the first three wishes which it will please thee to utter, whatever these may be. Consider well what things can bring thee joy and prosperity, and as thy happiness is at stake, be not over-hasty, but resolve the matter in thy mind."

Having thus spoken Jupiter withdrew himself and made his ascent to Olympus. As for our woodcutter, he blithely corded his faggot, and throwing it over his shoulder, made for his home.

Well, what were the first three wishes the woodcutter made? Were they wise and well thought out or did he wish out of anger and revenege?

Download and read this story to find out, and look for the moral at the end.

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

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