The Havamal - The Sayings of Odin the Wise One: An Extract from the Poetic Edda

Abela Publishing Ltd
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THERE existed from very early times a collection of Norse proverbs and wise counsels, which were attributed to Odin (Othin) just as the Biblical proverbs were to Solomon. This collection was known as "The High One's Words," and forms the basis of the present poem.

Few gnomic collections in the world's literary history present sounder wisdom more tersely expressed than the Havamal. Like the Book of Proverbs it occasionally rises to lofty heights of poetry. If it presents the worldly wisdom of a violent race, it also shows noble ideals of loyalty, truth, and unfaltering courage.

Over time other poems were added to the original content dealing with wisdom which seemed, by their nature, to imply that the speaker was Odin. Thus a catalogue of runes, or charms, was tacked on, and also a set of proverbs. Here and there bits of verse crept in; and of course the loose structure of the poem made it easy for any reciter to insert new stanzas almost at will. This curious miscellany is what we now have as the Havamal

Five separate elements are pretty clearly recognizable: (1) the Havamal proper (stanzas 1-80), a collection of proverbs and counsels for the conduct of life; (2) the Loddfafnismol (stanzas 111-138), a collection somewhat similar to the first, but specifically addressed to a certain Loddfafnir; (3) the Ljothatal (stanzas 147-165), a collection of charms; (4) the lovestory of Odin and Billing's daughter (stanzas 96-102); (5) the story of how Odin got the mead of poetry from the maiden Gunnloth (stanzas 103-110). There is also a brief passage (stanzas 139-146) telling how Odin won the runes, this passage being a natural introduction to the Ljothatal, and doubtless brought into the poem for that reason.

33% of the net profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

 

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About the author

In most likelihood the Eddic poems were Norse & Icelandic minstrel poems, passing orally from singer to singer and from poet to poet for centuries. None of the poems are attributed to a particular author, though many of them show strong individual characteristics and are likely to have been the work of individual poets. Scholars sometimes speculate on hypothetical authors, but firm and accepted conclusions have never been reached.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Apr 23, 2014
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Pages
96
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ISBN
9781909302631
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Juvenile Fiction / Legends, Myths, Fables / Norse
Literary Collections / European / Scandinavian
Poetry / Subjects & Themes / Inspirational & Religious
Religion / Inspirational
Young Adult Nonfiction / Inspirational & Personal Growth
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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THE following translation was undertaken from a desire to lay before the English-speaking people the full treasury of epical beauty, folklore, and mythology comprised in The Kalevala (the Land of Heroes, the national epic of the Finns.) The Kalevala describes Finnish nature very minutely and very beautifully. 

Grimm says that no poem is to be compared with it in this respect. A deeper and more esoteric meaning of the Kalevala, however, points to a contest between Light and Darkness. The numerous myths of the poem are likewise full of significance and beauty, and the Kalevala should be read between the lines, in order that the full meaning of this great epic may be comprehended. 

The whole poem is replete with the most fascinating folk-lore about the mysteries of nature, the origin of things, the enigmas of human tears, and, true to the character of a national epic, it represents not only the poetry, but the entire wisdom and accumulated experience of a nation. 

One of the most notable characteristics of the Finnish mythology is the interdependence among the gods. The Finnish deities, like the ancient gods of Italy and Greece, are generally represented in pairs. They have their individual abodes and are surrounded by their respective families. The Sun and the Moon each have a consort, and sons and daughters. Only two sons of Paeivae appear in The Kalevala, one comes to aid of Wainamoinen in his efforts to destroy the mystic Fire-fish, by throwing from the heavens to the girdle of the hero, a "magic knife, silver-edged, and golden-handled;" the other son, Panu, the Fire-child, brings back to Kalevala the fire that bad been stolen by Louhi, the wicked hostess of Pohyola. 

33% of the net profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

The two books contained in this volume are considered by many scholars to be part of the "Pseudepigrapha" and form part of “The Forgotten Books of Eden” edited by Rutherford H. Platt, Jr. These books are a written account of what happened to Adam and Eve in the days of after they were cast out of the Garden of Eden.

 

The First Book of Adam and Eve details the life and times of Adam and Eve in the period immediately following their expulsion from the Garden of Eden to the time that Cain slays his brother Abel.

 

It tells of Adam and Eve's first dwelling in the Cave of Treasures; their trials and temptations; and of Satan's many apparitions to them. It also tells of the birth of Cain, Abel, and their twin sisters; and of Cain's love for his beautiful twin sister, Luluwa, whom Adam and Eve wished to be joined to Abel

 

The Second Book of Adam and Eve gives an account of the life and times of Cain and his twin Sister Luluwa after they went away until the time that Enoch was taken by God.

 

The "Pseudepigrapha" is a collection of historical biblical works that are considered to be fiction. Because of this, this book was not included in the compilation of the Christian Bible. Although considered to be Pseudepigrapha by some, it carries significant meaning and insight into events of that time.

 

In order to put these two books into perspective, one has to ask how, and why, these writings have survived through the centuries and if they are as unsubstantial as many righteous scholars claim them to be?

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 122

 

In issue 122 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the ancient Egyptian tale of the story of Osiris. In the beginning the sun god Ra cursed Nut, and his curse was that none of her children should be born on any day of any year. But Nut finds a way and Osiris was born on the first day, Horus on the second, Set on the third, Isis on the fourth, and Nephthys on the fifth. This is the story of Osiris.......…… Download and read this ancient story of the Egyptian deities.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

 

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