Stalingrad: Letters from the Volga

Naval Institute Press
Free sample

"Stalingrad. From August 1942 to February 1943 this model industrial city, bathed by the waters of the Volga, was home to the bloodiest battle of World War II. Stalingrad: Letters from the Volga offers a fast-paced depiction of this titanic struggle: explicit, crude, and without concessions—just as the war and the memory of all those involved demands. The battle rendered devastating results. Almost two million human beings were marked forever in its crosshairs, a frightening figure comprised of the dead, injured, sick, captured, and missing. Military and civilians alike paid with their lives for the personal fight between Stalin and Hitler, which materialized in long months of primitive conflict among the smoking ruins of Stalingrad and its surroundings. Stalingrad: Letters from the Volga presents the battle, beginning to end, through the eyes of Russian and German soldiers. Take a chronological tour of the massacre, relive the fights, and feel the drama of trying to survive in a relentless hell of ice and snow."
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About the author

Antonio Gil is a Spanish illustrator and comic author who specializes in military culture. His work can be seen in more than 100 publications in specialized magazines and books focusing on different periods of history, from Ancient Rome to the operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. He is a frequent guest at conferences, speaking about the Eastern Front in World War II, and mainly about the German operations in Stalingrad, of which he is a specialist.



Daniel Ortega is a Spanish author of a series of novels published about a group of German soldiers surviving the horrors of World War II and of the German army. He is a specialist in the structure of the German army and the European theater in World War II.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Naval Institute Press
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Published on
May 15, 2019
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Pages
120
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ISBN
9781682474518
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Language
English
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Genres
Comics & Graphic Novels / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Pacifist Robert Wells finds his ideals challenged with the outbreak of World War II. As a Catholic, a socialist, and an Australian who remembers what the last war cost his family and country, he is firmly against fighting, but his intellectual beliefs struggle with the emotional pull to enlist. Family duties and his sense of responsibility for German refugees heighten the internal conflict. In this first volume of a trilogy, Mutard, cofounder of the Australian journal Comics Quarterly, skillfully explores Australia's home front, examining issues such as refugee integration, anti-Semitism, socialism, and government censorship. The intense philosophical discussion can slow the story's momentum, but there is plenty of human drama. The physical sense of place is equally strong: you can practically feel the heat and smell the dust in the detailed black-and-white art. Verdict One man's moral struggle illuminates Australia's experience of World War II. The wealth of social and political detail will appeal to history buffs seeking a fresh perspective on the period, and the thoughtful look at the social costs of war has contemporary relevance as well. Coarse language and mature content make this suitable for adult collections. [Xpress Reviews, The Library Journal, 13/08/2012].

The first of three planned volumes, this heavy (in both size and content) graphic novel explores the Australian experience during WWII. It's slow going and talky, as various characters converse about world events beginning in 1939, impending war, and continuing economic struggles. The lead, Robert Wells, has a management job and a bent to pacifism. He's left the Catholic Church although he still believes in God. He's fascinated by the talented voice of the daughter of German refugee neighbors, although put off by the way she's been indoctrinated with ideas about the superiority of her type. His brother joins the military; his girlfriend supports communism; the young girl runs wanton during the war. They all debate capitalism, restrictive government policies, the economy, ethics, and religion. A glossary would have been appreciated for non-Aussie readers not familiar with the slang, cultural terms, and local leaders of the time, although much can be determined by context. The art is historically evocative heavy, but sometimes stiff. The story reads as though looking at a series of old photographs, an intriguing personal glimpse of history that rewards those who are willing to learn more of the Australian experience, but probably without mass appeal outside its native land. (Publisher's Weekly 13/08/2012].

Octavia E. Butler’s bestselling literary science-fiction masterpiece, Kindred, now in graphic novel format.
 
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