Morocco Bound: Disorienting America’s Maghreb, from Casablanca to the Marrakech Express

Duke University Press
Free sample

Until attention shifted to the Middle East in the early 1970s, Americans turned most often toward the Maghreb—Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and the Sahara—for their understanding of “the Arab.” In Morocco Bound, Brian T. Edwards examines American representations of the Maghreb during three pivotal decades—from 1942, when the United States entered the North African campaign of World War II, through 1973. He reveals how American film and literary, historical, journalistic, and anthropological accounts of the region imagined the role of the United States in a world it seemed to dominate at the same time that they displaced domestic social concerns—particularly about race relations—onto an “exotic” North Africa.

Edwards reads a broad range of texts to recuperate the disorienting possibilities for rethinking American empire. Examining work by William Burroughs, Jane Bowles, Ernie Pyle, A. J. Liebling, Jane Kramer, Alfred Hitchcock, Clifford Geertz, James Michener, Ornette Coleman, General George S. Patton, and others, he puts American texts in conversation with an archive of Maghrebi responses. Whether considering Warner Brothers’ marketing of the movie Casablanca in 1942, journalistic representations of Tangier as a city of excess and queerness, Paul Bowles’s collaboration with the Moroccan artist Mohammed Mrabet, the hippie communities in and around Marrakech in the 1960s and early 1970s, or the writings of young American anthropologists working nearby at the same time, Edwards illuminates the circulation of American texts, their relationship to Maghrebi history, and the ways they might be read so as to reimagine the role of American culture in the world.

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About the author

Brian T. Edwards is Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literary Studies at Northwestern University.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Duke University Press
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Published on
Oct 28, 2005
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Pages
383
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ISBN
9780822387121
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / American / General
Literary Criticism / Semiotics & Theory
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Europe (in Theory) is an innovative analysis of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century ideas about Europe that continue to inform thinking about culture, politics, and identity today. Drawing on insights from subaltern and postcolonial studies, Roberto M. Dainotto deconstructs imperialism not from the so-called periphery but from within Europe itself. He proposes a genealogy of Eurocentrism that accounts for the way modern theories of Europe have marginalized the continent’s own southern region, portraying countries including Greece, Italy, Spain, and Portugal as irrational, corrupt, and clan-based in comparison to the rational, civic-minded nations of northern Europe. Dainotto argues that beginning with Montesquieu’s The Spirit of Laws (1748), Europe not only defined itself against an “Oriental” other but also against elements within its own borders: its South. He locates the roots of Eurocentrism in this disavowal; internalizing the other made it possible to understand and explain Europe without reference to anything beyond its boundaries.

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The relationship between fiction and historiography in Francoist Spain (1939–1975) is a contentious one. The intricacies of this relationship, in which fiction works to subvert the regime’s authority to write the past, are the focus of David K. Herzberger’s book.
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Brian Edwards may be a celebrated talent executive, multi-award winning producer, writer and occasional performer, but to friends such as Cindy Crawford and Whoopi Goldberg, he is known quite simply as Miss Thang. The late, great Joan Rivers wrote the foreword and Crawford penned the introduction to his recent autobiography, Enter Miss Thang, (published by Archway Publishing) which became a national best seller and ends the year as the most honored LGBT Non-Fiction Book of 2014.

Enter Miss Thang received top honors for Best Humor and Best Gay & Lesbian Non-Fiction at The USA Best Book Awards, (presented by USA Book News), which rounded out the current book awards season, where Edwards also earned a total of ten national and international awards in various categories such as Humor, in addition to dominating the field of LGBT Non-Fiction with wins at The International Book Awards, The Beverly Hills Book Awards and The National Indie Excellence Awards, where it was also named Best Autobiography of the Year.

"Brian is the perfect example of a true friendand to so many. Enter Miss Thang is his story, filled with humor and passion for his work and the people he loves the most. A diva indeed, but it's a title he's definitely earned by managing to survive almost thirty years in Hollywood, cushioned by intelligence, flamboyance, gut instinct, loyalty, and, most of all, his sense of humor."

Vanessa Williams,

multi-platinum recording artist

and star of stage, television, and film

"In this book, Brian Edwards sets an example of giving and commitment that creates a standard for all of us to follow as to what a friend should truly be. I'm so proud of his life and legacy."

Sam Haskell,

former worldwide head of television

at the William Morris Agency

"Brian Edwards is my favorite diva of all time. I have worked with him on many Hollywood Walk of Fame ceremonies, which have given us both tears of happiness and tears from the laughter he brings out in me when working on these legendary events."

Ana Martinez,

producer for Hollywood

Walk of Fame

"Brian is one of the kindest, funniest, and most supportive people I have ever had the pleasure of meeting. He always takes good care of me stateside, like my fairy godmother! It's clear to see just how treasured, loved and respected Brian is and deservedly so."

Matt Cardle,

multi-platinum recording artist

"Having gotten to know Brian over the years I have come to realize his own personal story is as interesting as those of many of his famous friends and clients. He's fiercely loyal, outrageously funny, and generous to a fault."

Pam Tillis,

CMA and Grammy Awardwinning recording artist

"Enter Miss Thang encapsulates more than a man's wild and wonderful adventures in Hollywood, but reveals a dynamic and brilliant colleague and friend with a zest for life and all things fun and fabulous."

Mirjana Van Blaricom,

president of the

International Press Academy

"I have known Brian for almost twenty years. His enthusiasm and support of talent in this industry is incomparable. No one even comes close! He's also a dedicated friend who has always been there for me and so many others, when it truly mattered the most."

Ali Landry,

actress and spokesperson

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